“Fulla’s themes are abundance, protection, cycles and magic.  Her symbols are gold-colored items and hair.  The Teutonic sister of Frigg, Fulla visits us with fulfilment this year, just as her name – which means ‘fullness’ – implies. In legends, Fulla had long golden hair bound by a golden band. She guarded her sister’s enchanted casket of slippers, giving her an additional association as a protectress of magical tools.

In metaphysical traditions, hair is sometimes used in spells to empower them. In this case, to evoke Fulla’s protection over your magical tools, use a piece of your own hair. Pull one strand and adhere it in some manner to any tool that you want guarded from undesired energies. As you attach the hair, say words like:

‘Full, safeguard this <…………..>
even as you mindfully guarded Frigg’s treasures.’

If the hair ever falls off, re-create the spell.

The festival of Up-Hella-Aa has ancient origins and closely resembles Viking funeral rites, except that it’s meant for the season of winter! People on the Shetland Islands gather to watch the burning of a longship. The fire’s golden flame lights the way for spring’s and Fulla’s abundance. It also expels evil spirits.

In keeping with this custom, light as many lamps or candles as you can in your home, ideally yellow ones, and leave them on for a while to cast out any lingering darkness.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

In Germanic mythology, Fulla (Old Norse, possibly “bountiful”) or Volla (Old High German)  is Frigg’s handmaiden and messenger. She is a virgin Goddess who is hardly mentioned in lore or in detail.  The only detail that I have found is that She has long hair that was worn loose with a golden band adorning her crown. This golden ring was a gift given to her by Nanna and Baldr. Based on her long loose hair and the presence of this golden band, she is believed to be a Goddess of fertility, although she is not one of the Vanir.

“Frigg and Fulla” by Ludwig Pietsch

Fulla is also guardian of Frigg’s little box, which contains all of her jewelry. Fulla was also in charge of protecting Frigg’s golden shoes, and was entrusted with all of Frigg’s secrets. Fulla and Frigg are sisters.

In a moment of inmense need, Fulla once invented an excuse to keep Frigg protected from the wrath of Her husband Odin. Fulla had conjured up a dwarf to enchant the guards with a spell so she could shatter Odin’s statue. Frigg stole all the gold from this monument that had been built in Odins’ honor. With this precious metal at hand, She ordered a dwarf to forge a necklace out of it. It is no secret to all in Asgard that Frigg has a passion for jewelry. [1]

Fulla is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources; the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson; and in skaldic poetry.  Volla is attested in the “Horse Cure” Merseburg Incantation, recorded anonymously in the 10th century in Old High German, in which she assists in healing the wounded foal of Phol and is referred to as Frigg’s sister. Scholars have proposed theories about the implications of the Goddess. [2]

There is a lovely prayer in the Gisla saga Surssonar offered by the hero shortly before his death:
“My Fulla, fair faced, the goddess of stones
Who gladdens me much, shall hear of her friend
Standing straight, unafraid in the rain of spears.” (Galina Krasskova, Exploring the Northern Tradition: A Guide to Gods, Lore, Rites and Celebrations from the Norse, German and Anglo-Saxon Traditions).


Suggested Links:

Paxson, Diana L. Hrafnar.org, “Beloved“.