Irene“Irene’s themes are peace, cooperation and reconciliation. Her symbols are peace signs, white, gates and entryways. Look to this Greek Goddess of peace to get the year off harmoniously with your neighbors and with all those you meet. Irene is Zeus’s daughter and one of three Horae who together preside over matters of peace, order and justice. They guarded the gates of Mount Olympus to ensure that all who passed had good-intentioned hearts. Offerings to Irene were always bloodless, in honor of her amicable energy.

In 1920, the League of Nations was founded on this date to encourage harmony between nations. To commemorate this and honour Irene, extend the hand of truth of truce to someone with whom you’ve been bickering. Let the energy of this day pour through you to begin healing that situation.

Peace is something that really begins in our own backyards. To generate harmony at home and in your heart, make this simple Irene charm. On a piece of white paper draw a peace sign. Fold this three times, saying words like:

‘Order – never cause, justice – release, let there be peace.’

Put this somewhere safe in your home so Irene’s gentle warmth can fill your words and actions all year. Better still, make two charms and carry one with you to keep the peace in all your interactions!

Wear a white piece of clothing today as a reminder to approach life with peaceful intentions, words and actions.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“The Goddess of Peace” by Cheryl Yambrach Rose-Hall

Eirene (or Irene) was the goddess of peace (eirênê) and of the season of spring (eiar, eiarinos). Late spring was the usual campaign season in Greece when peace was most at risk. Eirene was one of three Horai, Goddesses of the seasons and the keepers of the gates of heaven. Her sisters were Eunomia (Order or Good-Pasture) and Dike (Justice).

She was probably identified with the Hora Thallo (Green Shoots), whose name Hesiod gives to Eirene as an epithet in the Theogony. Her opposite number was Polemos (War).

Horae amongst the gods of Olympus, Athenian red-figure kylix c. 5th BCE, Antikenmuseen, Berlin

In classical art She usually appears in the company of Her two sister Horai bearing the fruits of the seasons.

A reconstruction of the statue “Eirene and Ploutos”. The original statue was erected in Agora, Athens c. 370 BCE; produced after the peace between Athens and Sparta.

Statues of the Goddess represent her as a maiden holding the infant Ploutos (Wealth) in Her arms. In this guise She was identified with Demeter and Tykhe. [1].