Tag Archive: work


Goddess Ka-Blei-Jew-Lei-Hat

Ka-Blei-Jew-Lei-Hat’s themes are work, rest, recreation and prosperity. Her symbols are all tools of the trade.  The Assam Goddess of the marketplace and merchants takes a much-deserved rest from Her labors today and focuses on rewarding tasks that have been well done throughout the last eight months.

For most folks in the United States, Labor Day represents a long weekend without normal workaday activities. From a magical perspective, this holiday offers us a chance to thank Ka-Blei-Jew-Lei-Hat for our jobs (which keep a roof overhead and food on the table) and ask for Her blessing on the tools we use regularly. A secretary might empower his or her pen and steno pad; a musician can charge his or her instrument; a shopkeeper might anoint the cash register, a book clerk might burn specially chosen incense near Goddess-centered books (and in the business section), and so forth.

Some potential herbal tinctures and oils to use for inspiring Ka-Blei-Jew-Hat’s prosperity and watchfulness include cinnamon, clove, ginger, mint, orange and pine. To partake of the Goddess’s abundance by energizing your skills with Her magic, blend all of these (except pine) into a tea!

This Goddess can help with job searches, too. Just tell Her your need, then renew the newspaper to see what companies catch your eye. Then get on the phone or get the resume out so Ka-Ble-Jew-Lei-Hat can open that doorway.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Devi” by ~twiggy101

Well, sorry guys.  I found nothing on this Goddess other than what Patricia Telesco has written for today’s entry.  Just as well I guess; it’s pouring (we’re getting the tail end of Hurricane Isaac up here), my internet is acting up, the lights are flickering and I have a feeling we may lose power.  Oh well, let’s hope for better luck tomorrow…

Goddess oShion

Art by Robin Pushay

“oShion’s themes are luck, health, home, travel, prosperity, work and wealth. Her symbols are your lucky numbers, clothing and tokens.  Among the Romani, oShion rules over all matters of fortune and fate, including having the good timing it takes to really see a lot of luck! As we go about our summer activities, oShion keeps things interesting by mixing in a little serendipity.

Legend tells us that Gabriel declared this day among the most fortuitous on the calendar, especially for those wanting to travel, find a new home, improve their health, or embark on any prosperous project (like looking for a new job). oShion joins in these efforts by adding even more luck to a day already filled with positive influences. Take out any lucky items and wear or carry them today to augment the energy further.

Add luck-inspiring foods and spices to your diet to help you internalize your good fortune and make it last longer than twenty four hours. Examples include consuming oranges, pineapples and strawberries (or juices from these fruits) for breakfast. Or, bake with allspice and nutmeg.

As you dress, add a rose or violet to your outfit; both of these vibrate on lucky levels. Alternatively, carry a piece of turquoise, a piece of jet or an apache tear in your pocket to transport oShion’s good fortune wherever you go today. Leave an extra stone at home to encourage luck there too!”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“The Gypsy 2” by amoxes

Well, I had no luck on finding any information on this Goddess anywhere other than what others had restated from Patricia Telesco’s book.  A few sites listed Her as a minor European deity.  Seeing how the Romani trace their origins to the Indian Subcontinent, I can’t help but wonder if She is a local Romani tribal Goddess who may have had origins in India whose myths and stories had been lost and/or changed along the way; blended with that of other deities as She made Her way from India into Europe.  I base  this theory off of the the revered Romani deity, Kali Sara – whose origins seem to remain a mystery as well as how Kali came to be fused with the Black Madonna.  In saying that, could She then be a “sister” of  a Goddess such as Lakshmi – the Hindu Goddess of wealth, prosperity (both material and spiritual), fortune, and the embodiment of beauty?  Or Mahalakshmi (another name for Lakshmi), who is said to bring good luck and is believed to protect Her devotees from all kinds of misery and money-related sorrows?

Until I find the time to do some real in-depth research on the Romani culture, I fear She will remain a mystery to me…

 

 

 

Sources:

Lee, Ronald. Romano Kopachi, “The Romani Goddess Kali Sara“.

Wikipedia, “Lakshmi“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Kaplan, Jeff,  Bron Taylor & Samuel S. Hill. The Encyclopedia of Religion and Nature, “ROMANI (“GYPSY”) RELIGION“.

Romaculture.com.mk, “Roma Culture – History“.

Sharanya: The Maa Batakali Cultural Mission, Inc., “Saint-Sara-la-Kali: A Sister to Kali Maa

Twroz, Karol. WROTA Podkarpackie, “Roma“.

Wikipedia, “Romani People“.

Goddess Tauropolos

"TAURUS" by ShellyeSR

“Tauropolos’ themes are work, patience, strength, and courage.  Her symbol is the bull.  No Goddess could better represent this date other than Tauropolos, the Cretan bull Goddess whose name literally means ‘Bull Lady’ (and that’s no bull!). Teaching us the virtues of diligence and the rewards of hard work, Tauropolos also has a strong connection to the fields (the plough) and the hearth, where food from the fields gets prepared.

The Cretans were all known for having bull-leaping festivals that honored this Goddess, probably as a fertility rite and test of one’s bravery. Oddly enough, this is how we come by the saying ‘seize the bull by the horns!’.

So, if there’s an area of your life in which you want to really seize the day, try this symbolic spell. Find and image of a bull (in a magazine, carved out of stone, or in some other form). Put it on the floor, and put a symbol of your aspiration on the side of the image across from you. Say:

‘Tauropolos, prepare the fields for success
Help me now to do my best.’

Leap over the image and claim victory!

If you can’t find bull images, any harvested item may represent Tauropolos instead. If you choose this option, be sure to consume the food later. This way you can internalize this Goddess’s tenacity, persistence and fortitude, then apply them toward successfully achieving your goals.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Tauropolos, known as Artemis Tauropolos,  is “an epithet for the Goddess Artemis, variously interpreted as worshipped at Tauris, or pulled by a yoke of bulls, or hunting bull Goddess. A statue of Artemis “Tauropolos” in Her temple at Brauron in Attica was supposed to have been brought from the Taurians by Iphigenia. Tauropolia was also a festival of Artemis in Athens.

There was a Tauropolion, a temple in a temenos sacred to Artemis Tauropolos, in the north Aegean island of Doliche (now Ikaria).” [1]

"Taurus" by faerieofskye

This very interesting piece entitled, “Artemis 0f the Bulls” by Carla Osborne describes the importance of bulls in ancient Greek religion, particularly in Crete and how they played a part in the worship of Mithras. “Artemis and Goddesses similar to Her were also closely connected to the bull and cow, sacred from Neolithic times. The head and horns of a bull resemble the uterus and ovaries of a woman, and the cow produced milk for people as well as her young. Both could provide meat, leather for clothing and footwear, horns for musical instruments, and so on. These connections had persisted on Crete more  than elsewhere in Southern Greece, where they were connected to Britomartis instead.

The bull’s head was clearly connected to rebirth and new life. The butterfly, one of the symbolic carriers of human souls in the cycle of rebirth. Hence the association between the bull’s head, butterfly and double ax. The bull and double ax became especially connected to Artemis. The ceremony of blood baptism was used in Her worship, later taken as a sacrament by the worshippers of Mithras.

Atia undergoing the taurobolium from HBO/BBC's series "Rome"

The ceremony used by those worshippers may not have been identical to that of Tauropolos, however. Worshippers of Mithras stood beneath a grating, and were drenched with bull’s blood as its throat was cut above it. According to Greek writers, priestesses of Tauropolos were the only ones able to drink bull’s blood and survive, implying a strong taboo due to its sacred nature. They were also known to sometimes sacrifice gelded horses.

Baptism does not need more than a few drops of a liquid for sprinkling, as can be seen in present day Christian ceremionies. The religion around Mithras was created for professional soldiers, men who faced bloody death each day, an entirely different life pattern from most worshippers of Tauropolos.

On Bronze Age Crete, the Goddess of the Sun (Alectrona perhaps) was the one to whom bulls were sacred. The bull game of Crete was called the taurokathapsia, ‘purifying bull dance.’ This was not a bullfight, but a test  of bravery and skill, in which young women and men ran at the bull, grasped its horns, and somersaulted over its back. While Tauropolos does mean bullslayer, this refers to the sacrifice of bulls, not the process of infuriating and tormenting a large bull prior to killing it through loss of blood and repeated sword thrusts.

Sacrifice often involved beheading the bull and leaving its head in the temple, where the skull was used in sacred decoration. The meat was returned to the family who provided the bull, or if community sacrifice, was shared in a feast. No evidence exists of a human sacrifice in the Neolithic, the time these ceremonies derive from, or any such sacrifices later in this context.

The story of the island of Taurus, with its homicidal priestess of Artemis Iphigeneia is probably a demonization of other religious practises. Bull heads were mounted on the walls of many temples, from Catal Huyuk to Crete. The practice of embalming and displaying the heads of honored ancestors may also be the original action. It was meant to allow the ancestors to be part of the family, still remembered and respected, who in turn contributed wisdom and protection.

So Iphigeneia, whose name is also a title of Artemis, is a mortuary priestess like Kirke and Calypso.  Men in Attica could dedicate themselves to Artemis Tauropolos by undergoing a mock beheading ceremony in which a few drops of blood were drawn from his neck with a labrys. Its descendant is the English Knighting ceremony.” [2]

 

 

Sources:

Osborne, Carla.  The New AmazoNation, “Different Aspects of Artemis“.

Wikipedia, “Artemis Tauropolos

Arachne

“Arachne’s themes are work, weaving and destiny. Her symbols are webs, spinning wheels and needles.
Arachne, the Greek spider Goddess, inspires positive changes in your destiny for the new year. Legend tells us that Arachne challenged Athena to a weaving contest and won. In anger, Athena destroyed the girl’s tapestry. Arachne, grief-stricken, took her destiny in hand and turned herself into a spider, but she continues to use her weaving talents to spin and pattern the lives of mortals.

According to lore, Saint Distaff, the patroness of weaving, was a fictional persona made up to mark the resumption of normal activity after the holidays. Instead of this imaginary figure, we turn to Arachne to help us take the strands of our fate in hand and begin weaving a year filled with Goddess energy.

To direct your spiritual focus toward the Goddess, wear something woven today, or display it proudly. If you have no such items, braid together three strands of thread or yarn, saying something like:

‘Arachne, bless this magic braid
so on you my mind is staid.’
Carry this as a charm to keep your thoughts and actions Goddess-centered.

Finally, mend any work clothes in need of repairs to improve your job standing. As you make the final knot in a button or hem, bind the magic by saying:
‘This thread I wind
The Magic bind.’

Visualize your professional goals as you work.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

In another version I read, Athena, angered at Arachne’s challenge, as well as the presumptuousness of her choice of subjects, tore Arachne’s tapestry (a tapestry showcasing scenes of Zeus’various infidelities: Leda with the Swan, Europa with the bull, Dana and the golden rain shower) to pieces and destroyed the loom. Then she touched Arachne’s forehead, making sure that she felt full guilt for her actions. Arachne was ashamed, but the guilt was far too deep for her poor, mortal mind. Depressed, she hanged herself.

Athena took pity on Arachne. She most likely did not expect that Arachne would commit suicide. She brought her back to life, but not as a human. By sprinkling her with the juices of aconite, Athena transformed the woman into a spider, her and her descendants to forever hang from threads and to be great weavers.

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