Tag Archive: rain


Goddess Chup

“Autumn Harvest” by Kandra Orr

“Chup’s themes are the harvest, reason, weather and providence. Her symbols are acorns, oak, rainwater and fire.  As a Native American Goddess of food, Chup is the founder of our feast today, the Miwok Acorn Feast.*  She oversees nature’s energies, specifically those of wind, rain and fire, and teaches people to use a combination of reason and their emotions to solve difficult problems.

This is an event of the Miwok people, who gather today as they have for thousands of years to celebrate the harvest through ritual and feasting. Acorns get made into breads and soups, having been a regional staple for early peoples.

Therefore, I advocate finding some creative uses for acorns, perhaps making them into runes or using them to mark the sacred circle in the east, west and south (the elemental regions that correspond to Chup).

To increase your reasoning skills, especially for a pressing situation, try this Chup spell: The next time it rains, gather the rainwater and warm it, gently blowing over the top of the pan three times and saying:

‘By Chup’s sensible winds, let this magic begin.
Within this water I bind keenness of mind.
By the fire actuate, all confusion abates.’

To this water add some spearmint leaves and a pinch of rosemary to augment conscious thought, then drink the tea to start the transformation process.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

My goodness, this Goddess was difficult to find!  I came across a Mayan moon Goddess called Ix-Chup and an Ainu moon/sun Goddess, Chup-Kamui, but no Chup.  After searching through Miwok mythologies, stories and lists of their spirits (they seem to have had a very animistic world view), and even Miwok baby names, I came across a blog entry called “Just Call me Chup, the Chumash goddess of wind“.  Yes!  A clue!  After Googling “Chumash goddess Chup”, I came across this paper on escholarship.org entitled, “The Integration of Myth and Ritual in South-Central California: The “Northern Complex” by Travis Hudson and Thomas Blackburn.  After searching the PDF file I downloaded, I came across this piece of information:

“Gaia” by Susan Seddon Boulet

Tsúqqit [Earth Goddess and creator of the human race with the help of Her five divine borthers], as mother of mankind and provider of knowledge, seems equivalent in some ways to earth; this suggests a secondary (or even primary?) Sky Father-Earth Mother theme with parallels elsewhere in southern California.  The apparent Chumash equivalent is Chup, described as a provider of food and an important female supernatural being.  It is interesting that Chup was frequently associated with the deer in Chumash ritual practices; for example, an ‘antap costumed as a deer opened the Earth ceremony, and deer-tibia whistles were used by the ‘antap during the ritual.  The ‘antap were also said to have played these whistles at Iwihinmu, where the appearance of deer apparently had ritual significance.  The Chumash, like the Kitanemuk, also believed Sun and Earth were in balance with one another; this recalls the Kitanemuk belief that Sun and Tsúqqit were opponents in the celestial peon game…” (p. 237).

In her book, Goddess in a Box, Nancy Blair writes: “It’s nearly impossible to name only one attribute of this many-named Spirit Mother of the California Chumash people.  She is the guardian of family and nation, intelligence, creativity and weather – the basic elements of life.  She is the One in All, as so many female deities are.  Her ritual name is Hütash.  In many Native American languages, there are dozens if not hundreds of words to describe the natural World.  One name doesn’t fit all contexts” (p. 43).

Earth Mother/Sky Father

Hope B. Werness writes: “Hutash (Chup or Shup in secular contexts). The Chumash and other California natives worshipped the earth as Hutash, a feminine being, source of all sustenance.  Highly sacred, Hutash possessed will, reason, emotions and power.  Her three aspects were wind, rain and fire – white, blue or black and red respectivley, depicted in the rainbow, a sign of plenty and good luck.  Hutash was depicted as a large encompassing disk or circle in Luiseno and Diegueno sand paintings and in Chumash rock paintings.  The Chumash believed the earth and heavens were equal and complementary forces, mirroring one another” (p. 139).

“Sadness of Gaia” by Josephine Wall

“In the Chumash story ‘The Rainbow Bridge,’ the Earth Goddess Hutash created the first people on Santa Cruz Island from seeds She gathered from a magic plant. One day Hutash’s husband, the Sky Snake (the Milky Way), gave the people the gift of fire. This gift warmed them and was used to cook food, which helped the people to grow strong and thrive. Soon the island became overcrowded. Hutash decided that some of the people would have to move to the mainland, and that’s how the Chumash came to populate the coastal mainland and what are now known as the Channel Islands.” [1]

“Earth Goddess” by Robert Florczak

 

* Please note: It was pointed out to me by a person of Miwok descent that Chup is indeed a Chumash Goddess derivative of a Mayan Goddess.  There is no indication of a Goddess linked by that name to the Miwok and furthermore that there are no legends on such a Goddess. It is apparent that Patricia Telesco cross miss identified nations with the Acorn Festival and the Chumash – totally different peoples and different histories.  My only thought on this is that as with many of her posts, Telesco meant to compare and illustrate the common essences of the two different cultures.

 

 

Sources:

Blair, Nancy. Goddess in a Box, “Chup“.

Hudson, Travis & Thomas Blackburn. Escholarship.org, “The Integration of Myth and Ritual in South-Central California: The ‘Northern Complex’“.

Native-languages.org, “Kitanemuk Legends“.

Weareca.org, “The Chumash Creation Story“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Bsahighadventure.org, “The Chumash Creation Myth“.

Ortiz, Beverly. Encyclopedia of Religion and Nature, “Miwok People” (p. 1094 – 1096).

Heizer, Robert & William C. Sturtevant. Handbook of North American Indians, Volume 8: California, “Kitanemuk“, (p. 567 – 568).

Leeming, David Adams. Creation Myths of the World: An Encyclopedia, Volume 1, “Miwok“.

Rain.org, “The Rainbow Bridge, a Chumash Legend“.

Suntree, Susan. Sacred Sites: The Secret History of Southern California.

Wikipedia, “Miwok Mythology“.

Goddess Po Ino Nogar

“Dewi Sri 2” by Much

“Po Ino Nogar’s themes are growth, harvest, fertility and community. Her symbols are clouds, saltwater, rain and soil. This agricultural Goddess’s name means simply ‘great one’ in Cambodia, likely due to the fact that She brings fertility to the earth and its people. It is Her duty to protect the fields and harvests. Epics sometimes symbolize Po Ino Nogar as a gentle rain, because local myths claim that She was born in the clouds and still controls the water’s generative gift to the land and to our souls.

Members of the royal family in Camobida used to plow the fields today to appease Po Ino Nogar and ensure fertility to the crops. For modern purposes, think about tasks that need to be be ‘plowed’ through – paperwork that’s been neglected, communicating with someone with a difficult demeanor, a project put on terminal hold. As you till the metamorphic soils of that situation, you also encourage Po Ino Nogar’s growth-oriented energy in them. If your spirit or humor has seemed a bit ‘dry’ lately, try this Po Ino Nogar visualization:

Close you eyes and imagine a blue-white cloud overhead with the face of a smiling woman formed by it creases. As you look , the cloud releases small light-drops that pour softly over you. As they do, your skin absorbs the light, as well as this Goddess’s energy. Continue the visualization until you feel filled to overflowing.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

 

“Among the Charms of Cambodia, the world’s Goddess-ruler, creator of rice, was called Po Ino Nogar (“Great One, Mother of the Kingdom”).  Born either from seafoam or from clouds, She had 97 husbands and 38 daughters.  One of Her offspring was Po Bya Tikuh (“mouse queen”), a maleficent virgin Goddess; another was the Goddess of disease, Po Yan Dari, who lived in caves and grottoes to which worshipers would bring stones, asking for miraculous cures.  Another Charm healing Goddess was the divine priestess Pajau Tan, said to be a thirtyish woman who lived on earth as a healer but who was finally sent to live in the moon because She kept raising all the dead; there She still lives, providing flowers to newly dead to ease their transformation” (Monaghan, p. 255).

 

 

 

Sources:

Monaghan, Patricia. The New Book of Goddesses and Heroines, “Po Ino Nogar”.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Davis, Kent. Devata.org, “Rice Goddesses of Indonesia, Cambodia and Thailand“.

Rongsit, Vipp. Content4reprint.com, “Thai Rice and Ceremony of Rice Goddess“.

Tate, Karen. Sacred Places of Goddess: 108 Destinations, “Temples of Angkor” (p. 211)

Wikipedia, “Phosop“.

“Rain Goddess” by Zeellis Tech

“Saoquing Niang’s themes are weather, harvest, and hope.  Her symbols are rain, clouds, stars (or light) and brooms.  Known as the Broom Lady in the Far East, Saoquing Niang lives among the stars, sweeping away or bringing rain clouds, depending on the land’s needs. From a spiritual perspective, Saoquing Niang’s moisture fills us with refreshing hope when our soul is thirsty.

A traditional rain ceremony in Laos, Bun Bang Fai is very ancient and ensures a good harvest. It includes all manner of festivities, such as fireworks that carry people’s prayers into the sky. In keeping with this, if sparklers are legal in your area, light one or two and scribe your wishes with light for Saoquing Niang to see.

For weather magic, tradition says that if you need Saoquing Niang’s literal or figurative rains, simply hang a piece of paper near your home with Her name written on it (ideally in blue pen, crayon, or marker). Take this paper down to banish a tempest or an emotional storm.

To draw Saoquing Niang’s hope into your life, take a broom and sweep your living space from the outside in toward the center. You  don’t actually have to gather up dirt (although symbolically getting rid of ‘dirt’ can improve your outlook). If you like, sing ‘Rain, rain, go away’ as you go. Keep the broom in a special place afterward to represent the Goddess.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Sao Ch’ing Niang Niang is the Chinese Goddess of good weather. Also known as the ‘Broom Lady’, She resides in the Broom-Star, Sao-Chou, and sweeps the clouds. She sweeps them in when rain is needed and out when it is not. Farmers often hang pictures of brooms on their fences when in need of Sao Ch’ing’s services. Her name, which literally means ‘broom Goddess’, is also seen as Sao Ch’ing Niang, Saoqing Niang, Sao Ching Niang Niang, and Sao-Ts’ing Niang”. [1]

Sources:

Sabrina. Goddess A Day, “Sao Ch’ing Niang Niang“.

Suggested Links:

Harmony Home, “Broom or Besom“.

Her Cyclopedia, “The Goddess Sao-Ts’ing-Niang“.

Lady of the Earth, “The Care and Feeding of the Wicca Broom“.

Goddess Mujaji

"African Genesis" by Margot Procknow

“Mujaji’s themes are balance, restoration, weather, cleansing and fertility.  Her symbols are rainwater. Mujaji is an African rain Goddess who exudes gently with fertility, or fiercely with cleansing, depending on the need. Her power and presence is so impressive that it led H. Rider Haggard to write the novel She, based on Her cult.

To purify any area and ready it for ritual, sprinkle rainwater as you move clockwise, saying:

 ‘Mujaji, flow through me
Mujaji, cleanse me
Mujaji, rain lightly here on all I love and hold dear.’

To expel unproductive emotions (represented by the sky’s tears), do the same thing, but move counter clockwise – this is the traditional direction of banishing.

If it does rain gently today, it is a sign of blessing. Go out and skip, dance, or sing in the rain (think Gene Kelly with a magical twist). This will renew your spirit and lift any dark clouds overshadowing your heart.

Africans observe the Masquerade as a time to reinstate symmetry in the world and in themselves. They wear elaborate costumes to appease the divine, praying for the necessary rainfall to ensure rich soil, and consequently an abundant harvest. To adapt this, pray to Mujaji to enrich the soil of your soul so that come the fall, you  can harvest Her productive nature.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

Mujaji is a rain Goddess of the Lovedu people in South Africa.  She sent drought to Her people’s enemies but caused rain to fall on Her people.  “The Goddess Mujaji seldom appeared to human beings.  She is said to reside in the Drakensberg Mountains.  In times past, She was propitiated with sacrifices of cattle.  She also ruled over purification and cleansed Her worshippers in preparation for ritual, and the people danced as an offering to Her.” [1]

"Mother of the Garden of Modjadji" by Lisa Iris

“The Rain Queens of the Lovedu bore Her name, whose incarnations they were.  These women, highly regarded for political prowess as well as military might, kept their people safe, first from the Zulu and later from the European Boers.  A weather Goddess, Mujaji controlled storms and floods; those who worshipped Her were rewarded with gentle rain that made gardens flourish” (Monaghan, 2009, p. 18).

Makobo Modjadji VI, the Rain Queen who led South Africa's Balobedu people, died aged only 27 on June 12, 2005. Currently there is no ruling Rain Queen.

“The original Mujaji, sometimes called Mujaji I, lived in isolation and was considered both wise and immortal.  She mated with Her father, Mugodo, and gave birth to Mujaji II, who succeeded her mother as queen.  During the reign of Mujaji II and her daughter Mujaji III, the Lovedu homeland was invaded by Europeans and Zulus.  Although the Europeans conquered the Lovedu, the tribe and its beliefs survived.  These two queens were were followed by Mujaji IV.  According to the Lovedu, Mujaji IV continues to oversee the supply of rainfall and the cycle of seasons in their land.  People make offerings to Mujaji and perform dances to please her.  A rain doctor assists by seeking the cause of any droughts and performing rituals to remove obstacles that block rainmaking powers.” [2]

Sources:

Auset, Brandi. The Goddess Guide: Exploring the Attributes and Correspondences fo the Divine Feminine, “Mujaji“.

Monaghan, Patricia. Encyclopedia of Goddesses and Heroines, “Mujaji“.

Myth Encyclopedia, “Mujaji“.

Stella. Goddesses and Gods, “Goddess Mujaji“.

Suggested Links:

Boddy-Evans, Alistair.  About.com: African History, “The Lovedu Rain Queen“.

Rain Queens of Africa, “Modjadji, The Rain Queen“.

Rain Queens of Africa, “The Rain Queen and the Lobedu: A North Sotho Tribe“.

The Suppressed Histories Archives: real women, global vision, “African Warrior Women“.

Wikipedia, “Rain Queen“.

Goddes Hara Ke

“Hara Ke’s themes are spring, weather, providence, harvest and growth.  Her symbols are seeds, soil, rain, water and dragon images.  An African Goddess of sweet water (which also equates with the gentle spring rains) Hara Ke comes into our lives and spring with gentle, growth-inspiring refreshment. According to legend She lives under the river Niger with two dragons in attendance, caring for the souls who await rebirth, just as earth awaits its reawakening with spring.

People in Namibia pull out all their garden tools and seeds and bless them today before the sowing season starts. This ensures a good harvest and plentiful rains, the water of Hara Ke’s spirit. If you garden or tinker with window pots, this tradition holds merit. Just sprinkle your tools and seeds with a little spring water or rainwater, when visualize the seeds being filled with pale green light (like new sprouts).

Alternatively, sprinkle your own aura, first going counter clockwise to was away residual sickness or tension, then going clockwise to invoke Hara Ke. As you sprinkle the water, say:

Hara Ke, renew in me a sense of refreshed ability
To my spirit, growth impart
Make your home my heart.’
 

If you’re pressed for time, you can recite this in your morning shower or while doing the laundry (during the rinse cycle). The latter allows you to figuratively don Hara Ke’s attributes with your clothing whenever you need them. “

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

This Goddess was EXTREMELY elusive!  The only mention I found made of Her was in a book called “Dictionary of Gods and Goddesses” by Michael Jordan. “Goddess of sweet water. Songhai [Niger, West Africa].  Considered to live beneath the waters in the tributaries of the river Niger, attended by two dragon, Godi and Goru.  The spirits of the dead believed to live in a paradise city in the depths of the Niger.” [1]

Sources:

Jordan, Michael. Dictionary of Gods and Goddesses, “Hara Ke” at p. 112.

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