Tag Archive: princess


Dahut-Ahes

“Babonneau Ahes Dahud” by Christophe Babonneau

“Ahes’ themes are water, abundance, fertility, passion and courage. Her symbols are seawater and sea creatures.  This ancient pagan Goddess symbolizes the sea’s abundance, fertility and passion. She also teaches us about courage; She fought fervently against Christian influences to turn Her into a monstrous figure akin to a siren.

Ahes was honored with a plethora of beautiful ceremonies around the end of summer. If you have a beech tree nearby, you can follow the custom of gathering beneath it’s bowers or nearby a small pond. Here, wash any white cloth (perhaps an altar cloth). This brings Ahes’s health and productivity to wherever you keep that fabric swatch. For those who can’t find a beech tree or a pond, just add a little salt to your laundry today instead for a similar effect.

To engender this Goddess’s abundance, scent you hair with any earthy shampoo or cream rinse (the Bretons used moss). Definitely include some seafood in your diet today to partake of Her courage. Flavoring the fish with white borage flower, thyme, or a little black tea will accentuate brave energies.  And finally, if you have a seashell or bit of driftwood, find a way to release it back into Ahes’ care today (for example, give it to a river or leave it in a well). This thanks the Goddess for Her providence and encourages Her blessings in your life.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

Art by Luis Royo

I have found in my research that Ahes was also referred to as Dahud-Ahes and Dahut.  According to Patricia Monaghan, “this pagan princess lived in Brittany, the far-western Celtic wilderness of France, during the period when the Christian monks were destroying the remnants of the old European religion – the worship of maternal nature.  These flesh-despising monks ruined the princess’ pleasurs until Dahut begged her father, King Gradlon, to build her a retreat from the cruelties of the new way.

Gradlon seemed to ignore her, but all the while he was secretly building a magnificent city for her.  Located on the rocky Pointe du Raz and called Ys, it was to be hers to do with as she wished.  When he presented it to Dahut, the sensual princess was filled with joy at the splendid homes arranged to catch the setting sun’s rays.

Dahut’s people were rich and happy, but it soon became clear that Ys had been built too close to the sea.  Storms endangered the small fishing craft by which the people of Ys earned their wealth. Dahut asked Gradlon to build them a safe harbor, but the king, threatened with damnation by the monks, built instead a fin new church to the Christian god right in the center of Ys.

Furious, Dahut rowed that night through dangerous coastal waters to a secret island where women – possibly immortals – continued to celebrate the ancient rites.  There she asked them to command the sea spirits, the Korrigans, to help her; she offered eternal fidelity to the old ways in return.

But then Dahut’s ambition poisoned her.  Granted the aid Ys needed, Dahut asked for yet another miracle: that magical powers would raise her palace high above the Christian church.  She was granted that, too, but her selfish desire took its toll.  For many years Dahut and her people lived in splendor and pleasure.  But the princess’ sickness grew.  Eventually she began to take one-night lovers, having them destroyed immediately after they left her.  The powers of passion and ambition that Dahut had stirred grew so strong that finally the king of the waters himself came to claim the princess – and he drowned the entire city of Ys when he did.

Although the above story is told as a local historical legend, it is possible that Dahut was originally a Breton Goddess – possibly Celtic, for her image recalls that of the Welsh Arianhod, who similarly mated with the ocean king.  But Brittany was also a center for pre-Celtic civilizations of note, including that of the megalith builders whose alignments to the winter solstice surround the hamlet of Carnac.  Dahut’s heritage could thus, like that of Celtic Brigid, include ancient material transformed as times changed” (p. 95 – 96).

“Dahut” by maelinn

At Joellessacredgrove.com, it states that “modern legends tell that her city was swept away by a wave caused by an intervening Christian saint. Pagan stories tell how she asked a city of Korrigans, the Breton sea faeries, to disguise her sea world until it was safe again for them to emerge again in a world without religious persecution. In this way she is similar to the sleeping deities, such s King Arthur, who lie in a state of suspended animation waiting until their people call upon them again.

Dahud was dubbed a Goddess of ‘debauchery’ by her detractors, while some more recent legends go so far as to make her the destroyer of her realm through her excesses and her worship of ‘idols’. Patriarchal legends say her father, recognizing her as evil, either escaped her world, or drowned her.

She is hailed as a Goddess of earthly pleasure by her followers. Archetypally she can be viewed as a mother Goddess cradling the reborn infant of the Old Religion, and as a rebel against patriarchy and its new rules.” [1]

“Morgan La Fay” by Wendy Andrew

Upon further research, I also found links between Dahut and Morgan le Fay.  According to Arthurianadventure.com, “Once stories of Morgan had crossed the English Channel, Morgan became linked to a favourite Breton Goddess, named Dahut (or Ahes) Dahut was a princess, who had caused the destruction of her city Ys. But, we also read in earlier tales, that Dahut (or Ahes) was originally a Breton sea goddess. Later accounts say that she had died when the sea had flooded Ys, or that she had escaped by being transformed into a mermaid. It is interesting to note that the word Mor, in Breton, means the sea, and this draws out the connection between Morgan and the sea. Perhaps, they believed that she was a sea or water goddess.” [2]

 

 

 

Sources:

Arthurianadventure.com, Morgan le Fay” (down to section labeled “Brittany”).

Joellessacredgrove.com, Celtic Gods and Goddesses D,E,F“.

Monaghan, Patricia. The New Book of Goddesses and Heroines, “Dahut”.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Covenofthegoddess.com, “Goddess Dahut“.

Covenofthegoddess.com,Goddess Dahut Vision Ritual“.

Deamatre.wordpress.com, “Dahud“.

O’Keeffe, Christine. Tartanplace.com, Dahut, Dagosoitis (Guardian of the Waters) Dahud Ahes, Ahès (Good Witch) Marie-Morgane (Born of the Sea) Sirona, Syrene, Seraine (Star)“.

Timelessmyths.com, Dahut“.

Wikipedia, “Dahut“.

Goddess Auge

“Fire Goddess” by WoodpeckerArt

“Auge – Her themes are fire and fertility. Her symbols are the hearth, fire, stoves and cooking utensils.  This Spanish Goddess of heat and fertility helps us celebrate today’s festivities, Saint Lawrence Day, by providing our cooking fire! Auge also inspires the warmth of passion so that fertility will flow in the relationship and on a physical level if desired.

In an odd turn of events, the same saint, St. Lawrence, who was roasted alive because of his with became the patron saint of the kitchen and cookery in Spain and Italy. In keeping with this theme, prepare grilled or roasted food today, invoking Auge simply by lighting the flames!

If weather permits, have a fire festival in your yard over the barbecue or hibachi and bless your cooking utensils by placing them momentarily in the flames. As you do, add an incantation like this one:

‘By the forge, by the fire, Auge build the power higher.
Within these tools let there be an abundance of fertility!’

Use the tools outside or in your kitchen whenever you need extra productivity. Should the weather not cooperate, this spell works perfectly on a gas stove, which gives off a flame in which Auge can dwell.

Finally, wear red or orange hues today (the colors of fire), and remember to light a candle to honor this Goddess. Consider dabbing on some fiery aromas, too, like mint, orange or ginger for a little extra energy and affection.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

I could find no information on a Spanish Goddess named Auge for today’s entry.  I did find information however on an Arcadian princess named Auge, mother of the hero Telephus.

“Vestal” by fb101

In Greek mythology, Auge, a daughter of Aleus and Neaera and priestess of Athena Alea at Tegea, bore the hero Telephus to Heracles [in one account found in Sacred-Texts.com, it states that, “But when Hercules dwelt as a guest in the sanctuary of Athena, on his expedition against Augeas, he saw the maiden, and while intoxicated, he raped her.”]. Her father had been told by an oracle that he would be overthrown by his grandson.  [Auge] secreted the baby in the temple of Athena.” [1]

Now, according to Theoi Greek Mythology, “[Auge]…birthed her illegitimate son within the sacred precincts of [Athena]. As punishment for the sacriligeous act, Athena made the land barren until the king had the girl exiled and sold into slavery.” [2]

“Artemis and Callisto” by Sebastiano Ricci

Here, yet again, I am disappointed by the Goddesses in Greek mythology.  One such example that deeply disappoints me is the story of the nymph Callisto, one of Artemis’ devotees and companions, who was raped by Zeus (disguised as Artemis).  Callisto became pregnant as a result of the rape and when Artemis found out that Callisto had “broken” her vow of virginity, given away by her growing belly, Artemis banished her from the fold.  Then Hera gets in on the action and exacts revenge by grabbing Callisto by the hair, throwing her down and turning her into a bear shortly after giving birth. [3]  How is it that the victim gets the blame and is victimized not once, not twice, but three times??  To me, examples like these are infuriating and this is part of the reason why it is very hard for me to connect with the Goddesses of the Greek and Roman pantheons; or should I say the Goddesses of the patriarchal Hellenic Greek (influenced by the Ionians, the Achaeans and the Dorians who downgraded Them) and Roman pantheons as I have a great deal of reverence and respect for Their original pre-Hellenic, Minoan and Etruscan forms.  But anyways, back to our story…

“[Auge] had secreted her baby in the temple of Athena.  A scarcity of grain [apparently caused by Athena] alerted Aleus that there was a profanation of the temple, and he discovered the child.

In one version the baby was exposed on Mount Parthenion above Tegea, where Telephus was suckled by a deer.

Hercules and the Infant Telephus, Artist Unknown, c. 50 A.D., Italy

In another Auge was given to Nauplius (‘sailor’) who was to kill her, but who, taking pity, brought her to Teuthras, a king in Mysia, in Asia Minor. Alternatively, Auge and Telephus were put in a crate and set adrift on the sea. They washed up in Mysia, where Telephus later appeared in his wanderings; mother and son were about to consummate their marriage when they were parted by a thunderbolt.

Offering to Athena statue
Telephos frieze on The Great Altar at Pergamum.

In the time of Pausanias (2nd century CE), the tomb of Auge was still shown at Pergamon, where the Attalids venerated Telephus as a founding hero.  In the Telephus frieze on the Great Altar of Pergamon, Auge appears in a subsidiary role.” [4]

mountain goddess lydia

Now, I also found that Auge was the name of one of the twelve Horai meaning “Daybreak” (augê). [5]

In conclusion for today’s entry, I could find no connection between the Goddess Auge that Telesco describes as today’s Goddess and the Arcadian princess Auge, or the Auge of the Horae for that matter.  If anyone has any further information they’d like to share on the Spanish Auge or point me in another direction, I’d be sincerely grateful!

 

 

 

Sources:

Lee, Melissa. Encyclopedia Mythica, “Callisto“.

Sacred-Texts.com, “Telephus“.

Theoi Greek Mythology, “Athena Wrath“.

Theoi Greek Mythology, “Horai“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Baur, Paul Victor Christopher. Eileithyia.

Hellenica World, “Horae“.

Jones, Christopher Prestige. Kinship Diplomacy in the Ancient World.

 

 

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