“The Nine Muses – Calliope – The muse of Epic Poetry” by Paul Vincenti

“Calliope’s themes are art, communication and history. Her symbols are stories, books, pens and pencils and quills. A member of the Thracian muses, Calliope is the Goddess of epic poetry and eloquence, whose symbol is that of a stylus and tablets. Greek stories claim that this Goddess is the mother of all poets and musicians.

Tellabration, a national storytelling festival in Connecticut, began in 1988 as a way of preserving and perpetuating oral traditions and the bardic art of telling ‘tall tales’ and good stories, which Calliope inspires. Today She joins our celebration to motivate creativity in all areas of our lives, especially written and spoken words.

In today’s hurry-up world we often forget how powerful a word or phrase can be. To honor this Goddess, slow down a little all day long, and really consider how you’re communicating your ideas.

As the old saying goes, be sure your brain is in gear before shifting your tongue to high. During those moments of contemplation, Calliope will flow through you and give you the words you need.

During a break, take out a beloved book and start reading it again (Walden is my choice). Calliope will help you find something new and wonderful in those pages to inspire you even further in any task you undertake today. And perhaps go out and buy yourself a special pen and pencil and bless them to use for important missives.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Calliope” by Joseph Fagnani

“In Greek mythology, Calliope (‘beautiful-voiced’) was the muse of epic poetry, daughter of Zeus and Mnemosyne, and is believed to be Homer‘s muse, the inspiration for the Odyssey and the Iliad.

One account says Calliope was the lover of the war god Ares, and bore him several sons: MygdonEdonusBiston, and Odomantus (or Odomas), respectively the founders of Thracian tribes known as the MygdonesEdonesBistones, and Odomantes.

Calliope also had two famous sons, Orpheus and Linus, by either Apollo or the king Oeagrus of Thrace. She taught Orpheus verses for singing. She was also the wisest of the Muses, as well as the most assertive. Calliope married Oeagrus close to PimpleiaOlympus.

Calliope is always seen with a writing tablet in Her hand. At times, She is depicted as carrying a roll of paper or a book or as wearing a gold crown.” [1]





Wikipedia, “Calliope“.


Suggested Links:

Herwood, Mary Carol. Voices.yahoo.com, “The Greek Goddesses – #6 – the Muse Calliope“.

Theoi.com, “Mousai“.

Paleothea.com, “The Muses“.

Theoi.com, “KALLIOPE“.

Wikipedia, “Muse“.