Tag Archive: odin


Goddess Sól

* For today’s entry, Patricia Telesco names “Dag” as today’s Goddess. However, Dag (or Dagr) is NOT a Goddess and never was a Goddess.  Dag is a god in Norse mythology – ‘day’ personified. This personification appears in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, and the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson.  So, instead, as the purpose of this page is dedicated to rediscovering and exploring the Goddess in Her many aspects, forms and guises, I will be researching the Goddess Sól/Sunna, the ‘sun’ personified in Germanic mythology. 

 

Sól’s themes are the sun, blessings, cycles, healing, movement, and travel.  Her symbols are gold or yellow colored items, [chariots] and horses.  “Sól (Old Norse ‘Sun’) or Sunna (Old High German, and existing as an Old Norse and Icelandic synonym: see Wiktionary sunna, ‘Sun’) is the Sun personified in Germanic mythology.” [1] As the northern hemisphere approaches late spring, Sól’s inspiring light and warmth are welcome and notable. “Sól drives the chariot of the Sun across the sky every day pulled by the horses Alsviðr (‘Very Fast’) and Arvakr (‘Early Rising’)” [2], giving Her additional connections with movement and safe travel.

“This date marks the return of the Midnight Sun, a ‘day’ for Norwegians that will actually last for ten weeks, emphasizing Sól’s power. Correspondingly, people’s activity level increases around the clock, as they sleep less to adjust to the change in earth’s cycle. So, when your inner resources lag or you’re out of kilter with natural or biological clocks, turn to Sól for assistance.

Wear gold or yellow items to tune into Her vibrations, and get out in Sól’s sunlight today (if the weather cooperates). It’s very healthy and naturally generates more of Sól’s positive energy for anything you undertake.

It’s an excellent day to take a short trip anywhere. If you enjoy horseback riding and have a stable nearby, take a jaunt and ride with Sól and the wind at your back. Alternatively, use ‘horse power’ and take a short drive in your car!”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

Interestingly enough, in Norse mythology, the Sun is female while the Moon is male. When the world was created from the body of the dead giant Ymir by the triad of OdinVili and Ve, the Sun, Moon and Stars were made from the gathered sparks that shot forth from Muspellsheim, the Land of Fire.

“Silmarillion: Arien” by ~LadyElleth

Sunna is the Norse Goddess of the Sun, also known as Sól – though some hold that Sól is the mother and Sunna Her daughter.  As Sunna, She is a healer as seen in one of the two Merseburg Incantations (the “horse cure”) written in the 9th or 10th century CE, which attests that Sunna is the sister of Sinthgunt. In Norse mythology, Sól is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, and the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson.  In both the Poetic Edda and the Prose Edda She is described as the sister of the personified moon, Máni, is the daughter of Mundilfæri, and is at times referred to as Álfröðull. [3] [4]

“Sunna -‘Mistress of the Sun,’ the ancient Scandinavians used to sing, ‘sits on a bare stone and spins on Her golden distaff for the hour before the sun rises.’  To the people of the north, as to many others, the bright day-bringing star was feminine, the Goddess Sunna – still honored whenever we point to the sun.

“Surrendering” by Frey­doon Ras­souli

Her people said that Sunna lived at first on earth; She was such a beautiful child that Her father, Mundilfæri, named Her after the most brilliant star.  But such presumption annoyed the gods of Asgard.  They took Sunna from earth to Her namesake, where She forever after rode the chariot of day.  Pulling Her were divine horses…under their harnesses were bags of wind that cooled them and the earth as they traveled with their mistress through the sky.  Likewise Sunna carried the shield Svalin (‘cool’), which protected the earth from too intense contact with Her rays.

Sunna was not really immortal, for like other Scandinavian gods, She was doomed to die at Ragnarök, the end of the universe.  She was said to be constantly chased through the sky by the Fenris-wolf Sköll, offspring of a female giant (it is said that sometimes he comes so close that he is able to take a bite out of the Sun, causing an eclipse. [5]); on the last day he would catch Her and devour Her.  But say the eddas, ‘one beaming daughter the bright Sunna bears before She is swallowed,’ and this new sun daughter would take Her mother’s place in the new sky following the destruction of Sunna’s realm.  (When the world is destroyed, a new world shall be born, a world of peace and love, and the Sun’s bright daughter shall outshine Her mother. [6])

The ‘bright bride of heaven’ had, in addition to the familiar powers we grant the sun, a special function in Norse mythology.  She was the ‘elf beam’ or ‘deceiver of dwarves’, for those creatures were petrified by Her glance. Stone was important to Her in another way, for Her worshipers carved deep stone circles across the Scandinavian landscape as part of Her sacred rites.” (Monaghan, 1997, p. 287).

Alternate names: Sól, Sun, Sunna, Sunnu, Gull (“Gold”).

 

 

Sources:

Monaghan, Patricia. The New Book of Goddesses and Heroines, “Sunna”.

Took, Thalia. A-Muse-ing Grace Gallery, “Sunna, Norse Goddess of the Sun“.

Wikipedia, “Sól“.

 

Suggested Links:

Agaliha. Mystic Wicks, “Sól/Sunna {Goddess of the Week}“.

Crowfuzz & Tyrsson. Beliefnet, “Midsummer: A Celebration of the Goddess Sunna“.

Goddess-Guide.com, “Sun Goddesses“.

Northernpaganism.org, “The Northern Sky: Praising Sunna“.

Sabrina. Goddess A Day, “Sol“.

Goddess Gefn

“Freyja” by paintedflowers

“Gefn’s themes are sun, winter, spring, protection, health, love, divination, magic, fertility, foresight, and growth.  Her symbols are all green or growing things.  A Goddess whose name means simply ‘giver’, Gefn was regarded by the Norse-Germanic people as a frolicsome, fertile figure and seeress who embodied the earth’s greenery. Gefn brings this abundance to us today: abundant well-being, abundant companionship, and abundant Goddess-centered magic!

Walpurgisnacht with a German saint (Saint Walburga), who had curative powers and taught people how to banish curses. For our purpose, Gefn stands in, offering to heal the curse of a broken heart by filling our lives with love and hope-filled foresight. If someone has completely overlooked or trashed your feelings recently, ask Gefn for help in words that you find comfortable. She’s waiting and willing to apply a spiritual salve to that wound.

Also try the German custom of ringing bells and banging pots to frighten away any malicious or prankish magic (or people who make it) before your spring activities really start to rock ‘n’ roll. Make this as playful as possible to encourage Gefn’s participation. Burning rosemary and juniper likewise cleanses the area, and if you can get either of these fresh, Gefn’s presence lies within. The burning releases Her energy.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“In Norse mythology, Gefjon (pronounced GEF-yon) or Gefjun (with the alternate spelling Gefion) is a Goddess associated with ploughing, the Danish island of Zealand, the legendary Swedish king Gylfi, the legendary Danish king Skjöldr, foreknowledge, and virginity. Gefjon is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources; the Prose Edda and Heimskringla, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson; in the works of skalds; and appears as a gloss for various Greco-Roman Goddesses in some Old Norse translations of Latin works.

Gefjon ploughs the earth in Sweden by Lorenz Frølich

The Prose Edda and Heimskringla both report that Gefjon plowed away what is now lake Mälaren, Sweden, and with this land formed the island of Zealand, Denmark. In addition, the Prose Edda describes that not only is Gefjon a virgin Herself, but that all who die a virgin become Her attendants. Heimskringla records that Gefjon married the legendary Danish king Skjöldr and that the two dwelled in Lejre, Denmark.

Scholars have proposed theories about the etymology the name of the Goddess, connections to fertility and ploughing practices, the implications of the references made to Her as a virgin, five potential mentions of the Goddess in the Old English poem Beowulf, and potential connections between Gefjon and Grendel’s Mother and/or the Goddesses Freyja and Frigg.” [1]

The Gefion Fountain, located on the harbour front in Copenhagen, Denmark. Photo by Oliver J. Schirmer

“The predominant myth about Gefjon is from a ninth century poem by Bragi the Old and was retold by Snorri Sturluson in the thirteenth century. He relates how Odin had sent Gefjon out to look for more land, and She came to the court of King Gylfi of Sweden. She entertained the king, and in return he gave Her a grant of as much land as four oxen could plough in one day and one night. Gefjon went to the land of the giants where She had four sons with a giant. She turned the four sons into oxen and brought them back to King Gylfi. They dug up so much earth that they created a lake, Lake Mälaren, and the earth that they had dug they dumped into the sea where it formed an island, Zealand, which is now part of Denmark. Gefjon then moved to the island and married Odin’s son Skjöld, and their children became the royal family of Denmark.

Elsewhere in his works, Snorri Sturluson refers to Gefjon as a virgin Goddess, although the trickster God Loki claims that this is not true. Gefjon is one of Frigg’s handmaidens, and She in turn is served by women who died as virgins.” [2]

 

ASSOCIATIONS:

Also Called: The Giver; Mistress of Magick

Colors: Green, gold

Symbols: Plow, wheat, corn

Stones/Metals: Amber, malachite, copper

Plants: Hawthorn, alder, wheat, corn, elder, thyme, yarrow

Day: Friday

Runes: Gebo, Fehu, Jera       [3]

 

 

 

 

Sources:

Pagan Rights Coalition, “Gefjon“.

Sabrina. Goddess A Day, “Gefjon“.

Wikipedia, “Gefjon“.

 

Suggested Links:

Odin’s Volk, “Gefjon“.

Paxson, Diana L. Hrafnar.org, “Beloved“.

Quarrie, Deanne. Global Goddess, “Gefjon the Giver“.

Thomas, Dawn “Belladonna”. Global Goddess, “Goddess Gefjon and a Sample Ritual“.

VAIDILUTE, “Asgard and the Gods – Part 4

Wikipedia, “List of names of Freyja“.


Goddess Rindr

“The Snow Queen” by ArwensGrace

“Rindr’s themes are spring, overcoming, protection, fire, spirituality and change.  Her symbols are fir, solar images, gold and yellow.  In Scandinavia, Rindr represents winter struggling to retain control, even as people sometimes fight positive change because they find the process uncomfortable. Eventually, Rindr succumbs to Odin’s advances, which warm and fertilize Her, bringing spring. Rinda teaches us to likewise accept personal transformations gracefully.

Sometimes around the fourth Sunday after lent, many German villages stage a battle between the forces of winter and spring (of course, spring always wins). This might equate to a ritual tug-of-war game in which the winter puts up a good battle, but loses. Have people focus on something they similarly want to lose in their lives (like a negative characteristic).

To clear away the old and old ways, follow the German custom of creating an effigy of winter out of straw and burning it in the fire of spring. Just gather a few strands of straw from the kitchen broom. Tie them together with a white string (for protection), visualizing whatever situation you want ‘warmed up’ or habits/ideas you want ‘burned away’. Ignite this in a fire-safe container, saying:

‘As Rindr accepts Odin, I now accept change.’

 Let the straw burn to ash, then scatter it to disperse the energy.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Rindr (Old Norse) or Rinda (Latin) (sometimes Anglicized Rind) is described as a giantess, a primal Goddess of the frozen earth.  She is alternatively described as a human princess from the east (somewhere in present-day Russia). She was impregnated by Odin and gave birth to Váli.

“Ice Queen” by StinaBG

The main account of Rindr is book III of the Gesta Danorum, written by Saxo Grammaticus around the early thirteenth century. There She is called Rinda and is the daughter of the King of the Ruthenians. After Balderus‘ death Odin consulted seers on how to get revenge. On their advice Odin went to the Ruthenians disguised as a warrior called Roster. There he was twice turned down by Rinda. He then disguised himself as a medicine woman called Wecha. When Rinda later fell ill, the disguised Odin said he had medicine with which to cure Her but it would cause a violent reaction. On advice from Odin the king tied Rinda to Her bed. Odin then proceeded to rape Her”. [1]

“Seeing his own child being raped, didn’t stop the king also violating his own daughter. When Rinda became pregnant, the king assumed that the child was his, but in reality it belonged to Odin.  Due to the rape of Rinda, Odin lost his throne as king of Asgard (which Saxo called Byzantium), and replaced by Oller (Wulder). Odin was forced into exile, but returned 10 years later to oust Oller. In Saxo’s account, Vali’s name is Boe, and Odin urged Boe to avenge his brother’s death. Boe did so, killing Hother (Hod).” [2]

“Óðinn’s seduction of Rindr is described once outside the Gesta Danorum, in a line of stanza 3 of Sigurðarkviða, a poem by Kormákr Ögmundarson praising Sigurðr Hlaðajarl, who ruled around Trondheim in the mid-tenth century. Like other such praise-poems, it is generally assumed to be genuine rather than a later pseudo-historical composition. Kormákr’s verse mentions that ‘Óðinn seið til Rindar’ (‘Óðinn ‘enchanted Rindr’), denoting Óðinn’s magical seduction of Rindr with the verb síða. This suggests that Kormakr thought the magic known as seiðr was integral to Óðinn’s wooing of Rindr, and is important evidence for Óðinn’s association with this kind of magic.” [3]

Isa – Ice, cold, freezing. Lack of change. Stagnation. Lack of emotion. Storing binding. Bridge across danger.

Interesting little fact, “The rune associated with Rinda is Isa, the ice rune, itself hard and cold yet concentrating and protective.” [4]

 

 

 

Sources:

Timeless Myths, “Aesir, Rind“.

Uldis. White Dragon, “The Faery Faith in the Northern Tradition“.

Wikipedia, “Rindr“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Kaldera, Raven. Northernpaganism.org, “Rind: Praising Rind“.

Lindow, John.  Handbook of Norse Mythology .
OrderInTheQuartz. Lagutyr.  “The Goddess Rindr“.

Coinciding with the Spring Equinox, the month of the Alder Moon is a time to focus on balance and fertility.

The Celtic month of Alder runs from mid-March to mid-April.  Significantly, this is a period that includes the Spring Equinox, the day on which the return of spring is celebrated and night and day are of equal length.  Falling at the start of spring, this period symbolizes the reawakening of the Earth Mother’s fertility.

Red alder buds. In moist forest areas red alder will rapidly cover a former burn or clearcut, temporarily preventing the growth of conifers but also improving soil fertility for future growth of conifers.

Growth and Fertility

The Alder month heralds a time of accelerated growth, and the spells you cast during this period can aid any business or creative ventures you undertake, bringing your ambitions closer to fruition.  Your emphasis during the month of the Alder Moon should be on harnessing our hidden potential.

Focusing on the Moon’s influence during this month will also help you bring a sense of balance to your work.  The power of the Alder Moon will be able to unite your intuitive side with a pragmatic approach to planning.

FERTILITY AND COURAGE

The alder tree is also known as the King of the Waters (with the willow tree as its Queen), because its natural habitat is near lakes, rivers and streams.  It actually grow with its roots in the water and its branches in the air and for this reason is associated with the balancing of female and male energies.

Symbols of Fertility

When the wood of the alder tree is cut, it turns from white to red, both of which are colors long associated with the Goddess’s fertility.  The buds of the alder tree also grow in spirals that are a symbol of regeneration and a reminder of the cycle to come.

Wood for Weapons

The Celts traditionally used charcoal made from the alder tree in the making of their weapons. This work was carried out in the spring – in preparation for the hunting season ahead.

 

In Welsh mythology, the alder fought in the front line of the “Battle of the Trees” against the Underworld.  When cut, its wood turns from white to red as though it is bleeding.  Growth near water, the tree has feminine associations, yet its links to war also indicate masculinity.  The Alder, therefore, speaks of balancing masculine and feminine.

ALDER MOON MAGIC

The month of the Alder Moon is the ideal time to focus on balancing your life, setting new goals for yourself and working to achieve them with energy and enthusiasm.

 

Meditating on the Yin-Yang symbol will help put your energies in balance.

Yin-Yang Meditation

The Yin-Yang is a symbol of male and female energies in perfect balance, and is an ideal symbol to use in meditation.  Remember to wear comfortable clothes and relax your body.

1. Look at the Yin-Yang and let your gaze become blurred.  Close you eyes while holding the image in your mind.

2. Concentrate on letting your in-breath become equal in length to your out-breath.

3. Focus on the Yin-Yang symbol and let other thoughts drift away.

 

 

Achieving Balance in Your Life

During the month of the Alder Moon, try to bring more balance into your life with the following tips:

Balance Your Books

Check your bank balance.  Always in the red? Find four ways you can economize this month. Small symbolic steps let the powers of the universe know that you are ready for some big changes.

 

Balanced Diet

Are you eating a balanced diet?  Remember that your body is a temple.  Valuing yourself is the first step to getting what you want.

 

 

Balance Your Emotions

Take up Yoga or Tai Chi during the Alder Moon. The balance of spirituality and physical exercise stimulates feelings of well-being.  your improved posture will radiate poise and confidence to the outside world.

 

Drink Plenty of Water

Take your lead from the alder tree: drink plenty of water and breathe deeply.  If you follow these simple rules, you will find you have more energy to make your dreams come true this spring.

Chocolate Love Ritual

Perform this simple spell with your partner to help your love grow stronger.

You Will Need:

  • A chocolate Easter egg
  • A pin
  • A red candle*
  • Matches

1. Create a romantic setting in the room you wish to use for your rite with soft music and scented candles.

2. Sit facing your partner, look into each other’s eyes and breath deeply.

3. Light the candle, then take it in turns to say these words to each other: “Beneath this Alder Moon I offer my love to you, may it grow ever stronger and ever clearer.  So may it be.”

4. Both use the pin to scratch four things you love about each other onto the chocolate egg.

5. Have fun feeding each other pieces of the egg.

6. Let the red candle burn down.  Your love will grow in the year ahead.

* A red dye can be produced from alder bark.  Utilize this association with red by using red candles in spells cast under the Alder Moon.

 

 

 

Source:
“Enhancing Your Body, Mind and Spirit”, 21 Nature Magic, CARD  8.

 

Suggested Links:

The Blue Roebuck, “Alder“.

Celticradio.net, “Celtic Zodiac: The Alder“.

The Goddess Tree, “Alder“.

Goddess Sága

“Sága’s themes are foresight, divination, inspiration, femininity, psychic abilities, kindness and tradition.  Her symbols are cups, water and fish.  Sága is an attendant of Frigg, is a Scandinavian Goddess whose name means ‘seeress’. Saga is a student of the Universe, ever watchful and ever instructing us about the value of keen observation. She is directly connected with the sign of Pisces, which governs artistic expression, psychic abilities and sensitivity toward others’ needs.

In artistic representations, Sage bears a long Viking braid, an emblem of womanhood and honor. According to the Eddas, Sága lives at Sinking Beach, a waterfall, where she offers Her guests a refreshing drink of inspiration from a golden cup. Later, Her name got applied to the sacred heroic texts of the Scandinavian people.

Tend your sacred journals today. Write about your path, your feelings, where you see yourself going, and where you’ve been. Saga lives in those words – in your musing, memories and thoughts – guiding them to the paper to inspire you now and in the future.

Invoke any of Sága’s attributes in your life today simply by practicing the art of observation. Really look at the world, your home, and the people around you. As you do, remember that little things count. Saga’s insight lies in the grain of sand and the wildflower as well as the stars.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Sága is one of the twelve major Goddesses, second only to Frigg according to Snorri in Prose Edda. She sits by the stream of memory and drinks from golden chalices at Her grand estate called Sökkvabekkr. Sökkvabekkr means ‘Sinking Beach’ and was a landscape of flowing waterfalls. There She and Oðin drink every day from golden chalices.  The liquid is either the waters of memory, or pehaps from the Well of Urðr.

Sága pours Odin a drink in an illustration (1893) by Jenny Nyström.

Her name means ‘seeress’ or ‘ominiscience’ and is connected with the Norse word for history – thus, some call Her the Goddess of history.  She is often assumed to be the sibyl or seeress who prophesizes Ragnarök.  Sága’s name is most likely directly related to the word saga (epic story) which in turn comes from the Old Norse verb segja ‘to say, tell’.

It has also been postulated that since Frigg knows everything about the present, and Sága knows all about the past, that Sága is an aspect of Frigg as Memory.

Sága’s genealogy is lost in the mists of time, and seems to belong to an older generation than that of the Vanir or Æsir, like Týr.  It is thought that She may have been an ancient sea deity akin to a Nerthus/Njörðr or Ægir/Rán combination, which is why sometimes She has been described as the Grandmother of Heimdall (who had nine mothers, the waves).

From Grímnismál
Oðin is describing the halls of the gods:

‘Sökkvabekkr, a fourth is called, and cool waves resound over it; there Oðin and Sága drink everyday, joyful, from golden cups.’ From the Poetic Edda, translated by Carolyne Larrington

From Gylfaginning
In answer to ‘Who are the  Asyniur?’

‘The highest if Frigg.  She has a dwelling called Fensalir and it is very splendid.  Second is Sága.  She dwells atSökkvabekkr, and that is a big place.’ From Snorri Sturluson’s Edda, translated by Anthony Faulkes

There is also some speculation that Iðunn and Sága might be one in the same.” [1]

 

 

Sources:

Ladysaga.tripod.com, “Saga“.

 

Suggested Links:

Krasskova, Galina. Exploring the Northern Tradition, “Saga“.

Paxson, Diana L. Hrafnar.org,Beloved“.

Wikipedia, “Sága and Sökkvabekkr“.


The lunar month of Ash is the perfect time to travel or just to plan your path ahead in every aspect of your life.

 

In ancient Europe, the ice began to thaw during the Ash Moon.  People ventured out of their homes for the first time since the dark days of late fall.  It is maybe for this reason that this month is linked with journeys.  Focus magic on transformation, moving you to a new space physically or spiritually.

Taking Time Out

The month of the Ash Moon is a good time to start planning your summer vacation and acclimatize your body to being outside.  Cast spells that take your inner energies on an excursion by harnessing natural forces, such as floating wishes downstream in a paper boat, or blessing a feather and letting it fly in the wind.  Valentine’s Day also occurs near the time of the Ash Moon, so cast a love spell that focuses on sharing your journey in the year ahead with someone special.

 

A SACRED TREE OF MAGIC

The ash has always been revered as a magical tree.  In Scandinavian countries the universe was believed to be composed of a giant ash called the Yggdrasil, and runes were traditionally made from ash wood.  In Greece ash trees were sacred to Poseidon, the god of the sea and the wood was used to carve charms that protected against drowning.

The ash tree is the “Tree of Life,” and its winged seeds, called keys, represent the key to universal understanding.

Ash For the Sick

Ash is renowned for its healing powers.  Sick children were passed through the ash branches, and a bowl of water and ash leaves by the sick-bed was an old remedy to speed recovery.  In witchcraft, ash wood is traditionally used to make healing wands, and the leaves from the ash are used to boost the power of protection and increase prosperity incense.

The tree is also believed to cure warts: prick the tree with a min then use the pin to cross the wars tree tines saying, “Ash tree, ashen tree, pray by this wart off me,” and put the pin back in the tree.  Hopefully, the warts will swiftly disappear!

 

ASH MOON MAGIC

Use Ash Moon spells to focus your mind through meditation or move your life in a new direction.  Use this month to create a healing wand or cast a love spell.

Journey Spells

Use the ash to attract good fortune in all your journeys, physical and metaphysical.

  • Write a letter to the angels telling them what you want to change in your life and asking for help.  Address it to paradise and “mail it” by burning the letter in a candle flame.  Wait for you answer; it will come in unexpected ways.
  • Draw in an image of your wish on a luggage label and attach to a kite.  Fly the kite and ask the spirits of the wind to make it come true.
  • Charge a feather; pass it through incense smoke and repeat a wish three times.  Drop it from a bridge into a river to activate the magic.

A Healing Wand

Harness the healing powers of the ash to make a wand.

1. Lay your hands on an ash tree’s trunk and say: “Magical tree, I ask for a wand infused with your power to heal.”

2. Cut a branch the length of your forearm and the thickness of the base of your index finger.

3. Shave off the bark and decorate with a soldering iron: runes and spirals are appropriate.

4. Charge the wand by leaving it in spring water overnight.  Use you wand whenever you are going to do some healing magic.

Walking Meditation

Practicing this technique during the Ash Moon will free your mind from stress and attract solutions to your problems.  You will need a smudge stick, a bunch of herbs – usually white sage – that is used to “smudge,” or cleanse, and area with smoke.

1. Light a smudge stick, then take time to relax and breathe deeply.

2. Direct the smoke around your body, taking time to cleanse your aura, and say: “Spirit, I walk this journey and invite you to join me.  May each step be sacred.”

3. Take a walk through nature.  Everything on your journey has a message for you, so relax and enjoy.

4. On your return, write down any animals you encountered and unusual sights or flashes of inspiration you received.

Ash Love Spell

Valentine’s Day falls close to the Ash Moon, so cast a spell to attract romance.

You Will Need

  • Red candle
  • Valentine’s card
  • Three red rose petals
  • Red pen

1. Light the candle saying, “Flame of desire, light the fire, three kisses and love will come.”

2. Kiss each rose petal and place them in the card.

3. Close the envelope and seal with red wax.

4. Send the card to your lover, or carry it as a talisman to attract love.

 

 

 

Source:
“Enhancing Your Body, Mind and Spirit”, 21 Nature Magic, CARD  7.

 

Suggested Links:

Blueroebuck.com, “Ash“.

The Goddess Tree, “Ash“.

Celticradio.net, “Celtic Zodiac: The Ash“.

Spiritblogger.wordpress.com, “Spirit Message of the Day – Spirit Message of the Day – Transformation by Creation“.

Goddess Fulla

“Fulla’s themes are abundance, protection, cycles and magic.  Her symbols are gold-colored items and hair.  The Teutonic sister of Frigg, Fulla visits us with fulfilment this year, just as her name – which means ‘fullness’ – implies. In legends, Fulla had long golden hair bound by a golden band. She guarded her sister’s enchanted casket of slippers, giving her an additional association as a protectress of magical tools.

In metaphysical traditions, hair is sometimes used in spells to empower them. In this case, to evoke Fulla’s protection over your magical tools, use a piece of your own hair. Pull one strand and adhere it in some manner to any tool that you want guarded from undesired energies. As you attach the hair, say words like:

‘Full, safeguard this <…………..>
even as you mindfully guarded Frigg’s treasures.’

If the hair ever falls off, re-create the spell.

The festival of Up-Hella-Aa has ancient origins and closely resembles Viking funeral rites, except that it’s meant for the season of winter! People on the Shetland Islands gather to watch the burning of a longship. The fire’s golden flame lights the way for spring’s and Fulla’s abundance. It also expels evil spirits.

In keeping with this custom, light as many lamps or candles as you can in your home, ideally yellow ones, and leave them on for a while to cast out any lingering darkness.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

In Germanic mythology, Fulla (Old Norse, possibly “bountiful”) or Volla (Old High German)  is Frigg’s handmaiden and messenger. She is a virgin Goddess who is hardly mentioned in lore or in detail.  The only detail that I have found is that She has long hair that was worn loose with a golden band adorning her crown. This golden ring was a gift given to her by Nanna and Baldr. Based on her long loose hair and the presence of this golden band, she is believed to be a Goddess of fertility, although she is not one of the Vanir.

“Frigg and Fulla” by Ludwig Pietsch

Fulla is also guardian of Frigg’s little box, which contains all of her jewelry. Fulla was also in charge of protecting Frigg’s golden shoes, and was entrusted with all of Frigg’s secrets. Fulla and Frigg are sisters.

In a moment of inmense need, Fulla once invented an excuse to keep Frigg protected from the wrath of Her husband Odin. Fulla had conjured up a dwarf to enchant the guards with a spell so she could shatter Odin’s statue. Frigg stole all the gold from this monument that had been built in Odins’ honor. With this precious metal at hand, She ordered a dwarf to forge a necklace out of it. It is no secret to all in Asgard that Frigg has a passion for jewelry. [1]

Fulla is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources; the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson; and in skaldic poetry.  Volla is attested in the “Horse Cure” Merseburg Incantation, recorded anonymously in the 10th century in Old High German, in which she assists in healing the wounded foal of Phol and is referred to as Frigg’s sister. Scholars have proposed theories about the implications of the Goddess. [2]

There is a lovely prayer in the Gisla saga Surssonar offered by the hero shortly before his death:
“My Fulla, fair faced, the goddess of stones
Who gladdens me much, shall hear of her friend
Standing straight, unafraid in the rain of spears.” (Galina Krasskova, Exploring the Northern Tradition: A Guide to Gods, Lore, Rites and Celebrations from the Norse, German and Anglo-Saxon Traditions).

 

Suggested Links:

Paxson, Diana L. Hrafnar.org, “Beloved“.

Goddess Gunnlod

"Gunnlöð" by Anders Zorn

“Gunnlod – Her themes are creativity, wisdom, health, protection and fertility.
Her symbols are mead, poetry, the cauldron or cup and apples.  This Teutonic Goddess guards the mead (a honey wine often made with apples) of sagacity and the muse – a refreshment most welcome at the outset of a new year. In art, Gunnlod is depicted as a giantess; according to stories about her, she stood vigilantly by the magic cauldron of Odherie until Odin wooed her and stole much of the elixir away.

For inspiration and insight, pick out a cup that’s special to you and fill it with apple tea and a teaspoon of honey (a mock mead). Stir it clockwise, saying:
‘Gunnlod, come to me
put ingenuity in this tea.’

Drink the tea to internalize the magic. If possible, sip it quietly while enjoying a good book of heartening poetry.

Alternatively, sip some mead, quaff some apple juice or eat an apple today for health and give a little of the leftover liquid to nearby trees. In Anglo-Saxon tradition, Wassail Day marked a time to enjoy wassail, a spiced apple cider or mead with herbs. Farmers shared this beverage with the apple groves to keep them fertile. Wassail literally means ‘be well’ or ‘be whole’. Drink of the wassail cup to ensure yourself of Gunnlod’s gifts of well-being, creativity and happiness all year.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

Odin and Gunnlöd

In Norse mythology, Gunnlöð (Old Norse “war-foam”) is a giantess. Her name could be written as Gunnlod.

She is daughter of the giant Suttungr, who was set guard by her father in the cavern where he housed the mead of poetry Her grandfather was Giling. Gunnlöð was seduced by Odin, who according to the Prose Edda bargained three nights of sex for three sips of the mead and then tricked her, stealing all of it. However, the poem Hávamál of the Poetic Edda tells the story a bit differently:

Gunnlod sat me in the golden seat,
Poured me precious mead:
Ill reward she had from me for that,
For her proud and passionate heart,
Her brooding foreboding spirit.
What I won from her I have well used:
I have waxed in wisdom since I came back,
bringing to Asgard Odhroerir,
the sacred draught.
Hardly would I have come home alive
From the garth of the grim troll,
Had Gunnlod not helped me, the good woman,
Who wrapped her arms around me.

 It would seem, from this version of the tale, that Gunnlöð helped Odin willingly, and that he thought well of her in return. [1]

Click here to read Gunnlod’s tale from Elizabeth Vongisith.

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