Tag Archive: native american mythology


Goddess Perimbo

“Perimbo themes are forgiveness, religious devotion, banishing, justice and karma. Her symbols are light and lunar emblems.  This Brazilian Goddess is the creatrix of all things. From Her home in the moon, Perimbo gently guides human life in benevolent ways. Balancing this kindness, She is also a Goddess of justice, meting out karmic punishment to teach important lessons when necessary.

During mid-October, the city of Belem in Brazil celebrates Círio de Nazaré and holds a parade in which people go barefoot, carrying weights and lights to banish evil, sin, and negativity from their lives.  To adapt this in a simple way and draw Perimbo’s benevolence into your living space, take a flashlight, candle, or long-stemmed match clockwise around your house, saying:

‘Perimbo, shine the light of fairness and devotion
throughout my home.’

Try to make sure the light reaches as many nooks and crannies as possible, symbolically banishing the shadows that hide there.

For a portable Perimbo charm to inspire equity in all your dealings, find a glow-in-the-dark image of the moon. Charge it up for several hours using sunlight or the flashlight from the previous spell, saying instead:

‘Perimbo, shine the light of fairness and devotion
throughout my life.’

Carry this in your pocket to radiate the Goddess’s power no matter where you may be.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

I only found a few references to today’s Goddess.  On Lowchensaustralia.com, it states: “Perimbo (Bakairi) Moon Goddess and supreme being who created the earth and all life on it. Wife of the moon god Poré.” [1]

Patricia Monaghan mentions Her in her book Encyclopedia of Goddesses and Heroines (a larger edition than the New Book of Goddesses and Heroines that I have in which Perimbo is not mentioned).  You can click here to read the preview, but the first page of the entry Her name is mentioned in is not included in the preview.

 

 

Sources:

Marks, Dominic. Lowchensaustralia.com,Goddess Names from Brazil: Perimbo“.

 

Suggested Links:

Encyclopedia of Religion Volume 13, “Yanoama and Mundurucú supreme beings” (p. 8577).

Goddess Çhicomecoatl

“Çhicomecoatl’s themes are fire, providence, energy, community, abundance, fertility and strength. Her symbols are hot spices (especially chili peppers), corn and fire.  In Mexico, this Goddess presides over maize and all matters of plenty during this time of harvest. Çhicomecoatl is also the hearth Goddess and provides warmth, energy and fertility in those in need. Her fiery, strong character is depicted vibrantly in artistic renderings in which Çhicomecoatl bears the sun as a shield.

Around this time of year, people in New Mexico celebrate The Whole Enchilada Festival in which they enjoy a day of taste-testing a ten-foot-long enchilada in a communal atmosphere, and you might like to follow suit.  The hot spices in enchiladas (or other Mexican foods you like) motivate Çhicomecoatl’s fire within for physical and emotional warmth. If you’re sensitive to hot peppers, add corn to your diet today instead. This invokes the Goddess’s strength and fertility.

More simply still, Çhicomecoatl abides in any fire source. So, light a candle first thing in the morning to welcome Her into your home today. For portable magic, carry matches or put a lighter in your pocket. Throughout the day, light a match or the lighter when ever you need a boost of energy or vitality, or when you need to improve your communications with those around you. This action also draws Çhicomecoatl’s attention to your financial needs.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“In Aztec mythology, Chicomecōātl (‘Seven snakes’), was the Aztec Goddess of agriculture during the Middle Culture period. She is sometimes called ‘Goddess of nourishment’, a Goddess of plenty and the female aspect of corn. Every September a young girl representing Chicomecōātl was sacrificed. The priests decapitated the girl, collected her blood and poured it over a figurine of the Goddess. The corpse was then flayed and the skin was worn by a priest.

She is regarded as the female counterpart of the maize god Centeōtl, their symbol being an ear of corn. She is occasionally called Xilonen, (‘the hairy one’, which referred to the hairs on unshucked maize), who was married also to Tezcatlipoca.

She often appeared with attributes of Chalchiuhtlicue, such as Her headdress and the short lines rubbing down Her cheeks. She is usually distinguished by being shown carrying ears of maize.” [1]

“CHICOMECOATL” by ~marffi89

“This maize Goddess of the Aztecs had many forms, as many as did the growing corn: She was a maiden decked with water flowers, a young woman whose embrace brought death, a mother carrying the sun as a shield.  One of the most popular divinities of ancient Mexico, She was depicted wearing a four-sided headdress and carrying a magic corncob labeled ‘forgiving strength.’  It is possible that Çhicomecoatl was originally worshiped by the residents of central Mexico who preceded the Aztecs, and that Her rites in their era were less bloody than the Aztec sacrifices of young girls in Çhicomecoatl’s name” (Monaghan, p. 85).

Sources:

Monaghan, Patricia. The New Book of Goddesses and Heroines, “Chicomecoatl”.

Wikipedia, “Chicomecoatl“.

Suggested Links:

Key, Anne. Matrifocus.com, “Chicomecóatl: Goddess of Sustenance“. (HIGHLY RECOMMEND!  As always is the case with MatriFocus, a great in-depth article)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, “Maize Deity (Chicomecoatl)“.

Cherokee First Woman

“Cherokee First Woman’s themes are spirituality, Universal Truth, unity, cleansing and abundance. Her symbols are all animals and plants.  This Goddess appears in Cherokee myths as an ancestress to the tribe and creatrix of all animals and plants. After the world was first inhabited, Cherokee First Woman continued to give birth to one child a year (this child may have symbolized the new year). Additionally, She motivates the earth’s bounty and generates abundance to sustain us through the months ahead.

Around this time of year, Cherokee tribes often hold a festival of offerings meant to celebrate their unity with the Sacred Parents and reunite them with this power. One custom easy to follow is that of exchanging clothes with a loved one; this symbolizes oneness among humans, the Gods, and each other.

Washing in running water today (shower or tap) will cleanse away any barrier that stands between you and the Goddess. If you hold a formal ritual today, place a bowl of water near the circle where each participant can rinse their hands to invoke Cherokee First Woman’s blessing and purification. Finally, drink a tall glass of spring water today to release this Goddess’s spiritual nature, rejuvenation, and abundance into every cell.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Corn Dawn Maiden” by Marti Fenton (White Deer Song)

Cherokee.org recounts the legend of Cherokee First Woman: “After the Great One had created the Earth and all the plants and animals, he created a tall brown man with beautiful straight hair to help Him on Earth. The Great One placed the strong, brown Cherokee man in the beautiful Smoky Mountains.

After a time the Great One remembered that although each man sometimes needs to be alone, each man would also need companionship to be his best. When the Cherokee man was sleeping, the Great One caused a green plant to grow up tall over the heart of the man.

The plant had long graceful leaves, an ear and golden tassel. As the plant grew, a beautiful, tall, brown woman began to appear at the top of the stalk. The man awoke and helped the beautiful woman down from the corn stalk.

Over a period of time, the man and woman built a home and planted the kernels from the corn. The turkey, a sacred bird of the Cherokee, showed the woman that the corn was ready to eat. When the man came in for supper, she pulled an ear of roasted corn from the pot and offered it to him. He began to eat the first corn of Spring.

The first woman was called Selu or Corn Woman.

NOTE: This is only one legend of how woman came to be on this earth. Because we are brothers of the Iroquois, we have a story very similar to the Sky Woman story.” [1]

 

 
Sources:

Cherokee.org, “Legend of the First Woman“.

 

Suggestion Links:

Firstpeople.us, “The Legend of the First Woman“.

Francis, Robert. Manataka.org, “Four Important Cherokee Stories“.

Gly.uga.edu, “The Story of Corn and Medicine“.

Native-languages.org, “Legendary Native American Figures: Selu“.

Neutrallandscherokee.com, “Cherokee Story of Creation“.

Wikipedia, “Cherokee Mythology“.

Goddess Haumea

“Haumea” by isa Marie

“Haumea’s themes are history, tradition, energy and restoration. Her symbols are leis, fresh flowers and Polynesian foodstuffs.  Hawaiian stories tell us that Haumea is the mother of Hawaii, having created it, the Hawaiian people, and all edible vegetation on these islands. Today She offers us renewed energy with which to restore or protect our traditions and rejoice in their beauty.

In Hawaii this marks the beginning of the Aloha Festival, a weeklong celebration of local custom and history complete with dances, parades, and sports competitions. For us this translates to reveling in our own local cultures, including foods, crafts, and the like. Hawumea lives in those customs and revels in your enjoyment of them.

If any historical site or tradition is slowly fading out due to ‘progress’, today also provides and excellent opportunity to try to draw some attention to that situation. Ask Haumea for Her help, then write letters to local officials, contact preservation or historical groups in that region, and see what you can do to keep that treasure alive.

For personal restoration or improved energy, I suggest eating some traditional Hawaiian foods today, as they are part of Haumea’s bounty and blessings. Have pineapple at breakfast, some macadamia nuts for a snack, and Kona coffee at work, and maybe even create a luau-style dinner for the family and friends to bless them too.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Haumea” by Kris Waldherr

“Originally, Hawaiian myth tells us, human women could not give birth.  They swelled with pregnancy and, when it was time for delivery, they were cut open – a dangerous procedure.  But the Goddess Haumea came to their rescue, teaching women how to push the child out between their legs.

Haumea was not so much ageless as ever-renewing.  Frequenctly She grew old, but as often She transformed Herself into a a young woman [much like Changing Woman/White Painted Woman or Estsanatlehi].  Generations went by and still She lived among humans, sleeping with the handsome young men even when they were Her grandchildren and dsitant descendants.  One of Her favored mates was named Wakea.  Once it was said, the people intended to sacrifice him.  Taking him to the forest, which was Her domain, Humea ran directly through the tree trunks, leaving shreds of Her shirts blooming as morning glory vines, and carried Her lover to safety.

Because She owned all the wild plants, Haumea could withdraw Her energy, leaving people to starve.  This She did when angry, but most often Haumea was a kindly Goddess.  Some say She is part of a trinity whose other aspects are the creator Hina and the fiery Pele” (Monaghan, p. 146).

“According to most accounts, She mated with the god Kane Milohai and gave birth to many children, including Hawaii’s most famous Goddess, Pele.  Thus, She is often referred to as the mother of the Hawaiian people as well as the Great Earth Mother.

Haumea was reported to be extremely skilled in childbirth. Because of that, children weren’t born of Her from mere traditional methods. Instead, they sprang from different parts of Her body. One Hawaiian legend claims that Pele was born from Her mother’s armpit, while another states that She came from a flame out of the Goddess’s mouth. Obviously, the second version makes more sense in light of Pele’s role as Goddess of the volcano.” [2]

Haumea’s other children included Kanemilohai, Kā-moho-aliʻi, Nāmakaokaha’i, Kapo and Hiʻiaka and was eventually killed by Kaulu.

Art by Susan Seddon Boulet

On 17 September 2008 the International Astronomical Union (IAU) announced it named the fifth known dwarf planet in the Solar System ‘Haumea‘ after the Hawaiian Goddess. The planet’s two moons were named after Haumea’s daughters: Hiʻiaka, after the Hawaiian Goddess said to have been born from the mouth of Haumea, and Namaka, after the water spirit said to have been born from Haumea’s body.” [3]

 

 

 

Sources:

Kuchinsky, Charlotte. Voices.yahoo.com, “Discovering the Polynesian Goddess Haumea“.

Monaghan, Patricia. The New Book of Goddesses and Heroines, “Haumea”.

Wikipedia, “Haumea (mythology)“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Powersthatbe.com, “ANCIENT HAWAIIN GODDESS HAUMEA“.

Sacred-texts.com, “XIX Haume“.

Goddess Chup

“Autumn Harvest” by Kandra Orr

“Chup’s themes are the harvest, reason, weather and providence. Her symbols are acorns, oak, rainwater and fire.  As a Native American Goddess of food, Chup is the founder of our feast today, the Miwok Acorn Feast.*  She oversees nature’s energies, specifically those of wind, rain and fire, and teaches people to use a combination of reason and their emotions to solve difficult problems.

This is an event of the Miwok people, who gather today as they have for thousands of years to celebrate the harvest through ritual and feasting. Acorns get made into breads and soups, having been a regional staple for early peoples.

Therefore, I advocate finding some creative uses for acorns, perhaps making them into runes or using them to mark the sacred circle in the east, west and south (the elemental regions that correspond to Chup).

To increase your reasoning skills, especially for a pressing situation, try this Chup spell: The next time it rains, gather the rainwater and warm it, gently blowing over the top of the pan three times and saying:

‘By Chup’s sensible winds, let this magic begin.
Within this water I bind keenness of mind.
By the fire actuate, all confusion abates.’

To this water add some spearmint leaves and a pinch of rosemary to augment conscious thought, then drink the tea to start the transformation process.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

My goodness, this Goddess was difficult to find!  I came across a Mayan moon Goddess called Ix-Chup and an Ainu moon/sun Goddess, Chup-Kamui, but no Chup.  After searching through Miwok mythologies, stories and lists of their spirits (they seem to have had a very animistic world view), and even Miwok baby names, I came across a blog entry called “Just Call me Chup, the Chumash goddess of wind“.  Yes!  A clue!  After Googling “Chumash goddess Chup”, I came across this paper on escholarship.org entitled, “The Integration of Myth and Ritual in South-Central California: The “Northern Complex” by Travis Hudson and Thomas Blackburn.  After searching the PDF file I downloaded, I came across this piece of information:

“Gaia” by Susan Seddon Boulet

Tsúqqit [Earth Goddess and creator of the human race with the help of Her five divine borthers], as mother of mankind and provider of knowledge, seems equivalent in some ways to earth; this suggests a secondary (or even primary?) Sky Father-Earth Mother theme with parallels elsewhere in southern California.  The apparent Chumash equivalent is Chup, described as a provider of food and an important female supernatural being.  It is interesting that Chup was frequently associated with the deer in Chumash ritual practices; for example, an ‘antap costumed as a deer opened the Earth ceremony, and deer-tibia whistles were used by the ‘antap during the ritual.  The ‘antap were also said to have played these whistles at Iwihinmu, where the appearance of deer apparently had ritual significance.  The Chumash, like the Kitanemuk, also believed Sun and Earth were in balance with one another; this recalls the Kitanemuk belief that Sun and Tsúqqit were opponents in the celestial peon game…” (p. 237).

In her book, Goddess in a Box, Nancy Blair writes: “It’s nearly impossible to name only one attribute of this many-named Spirit Mother of the California Chumash people.  She is the guardian of family and nation, intelligence, creativity and weather – the basic elements of life.  She is the One in All, as so many female deities are.  Her ritual name is Hütash.  In many Native American languages, there are dozens if not hundreds of words to describe the natural World.  One name doesn’t fit all contexts” (p. 43).

Earth Mother/Sky Father

Hope B. Werness writes: “Hutash (Chup or Shup in secular contexts). The Chumash and other California natives worshipped the earth as Hutash, a feminine being, source of all sustenance.  Highly sacred, Hutash possessed will, reason, emotions and power.  Her three aspects were wind, rain and fire – white, blue or black and red respectivley, depicted in the rainbow, a sign of plenty and good luck.  Hutash was depicted as a large encompassing disk or circle in Luiseno and Diegueno sand paintings and in Chumash rock paintings.  The Chumash believed the earth and heavens were equal and complementary forces, mirroring one another” (p. 139).

“Sadness of Gaia” by Josephine Wall

“In the Chumash story ‘The Rainbow Bridge,’ the Earth Goddess Hutash created the first people on Santa Cruz Island from seeds She gathered from a magic plant. One day Hutash’s husband, the Sky Snake (the Milky Way), gave the people the gift of fire. This gift warmed them and was used to cook food, which helped the people to grow strong and thrive. Soon the island became overcrowded. Hutash decided that some of the people would have to move to the mainland, and that’s how the Chumash came to populate the coastal mainland and what are now known as the Channel Islands.” [1]

“Earth Goddess” by Robert Florczak

 

* Please note: It was pointed out to me by a person of Miwok descent that Chup is indeed a Chumash Goddess derivative of a Mayan Goddess.  There is no indication of a Goddess linked by that name to the Miwok and furthermore that there are no legends on such a Goddess. It is apparent that Patricia Telesco cross miss identified nations with the Acorn Festival and the Chumash – totally different peoples and different histories.  My only thought on this is that as with many of her posts, Telesco meant to compare and illustrate the common essences of the two different cultures.

 

 

Sources:

Blair, Nancy. Goddess in a Box, “Chup“.

Hudson, Travis & Thomas Blackburn. Escholarship.org, “The Integration of Myth and Ritual in South-Central California: The ‘Northern Complex’“.

Native-languages.org, “Kitanemuk Legends“.

Weareca.org, “The Chumash Creation Story“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Bsahighadventure.org, “The Chumash Creation Myth“.

Ortiz, Beverly. Encyclopedia of Religion and Nature, “Miwok People” (p. 1094 – 1096).

Heizer, Robert & William C. Sturtevant. Handbook of North American Indians, Volume 8: California, “Kitanemuk“, (p. 567 – 568).

Leeming, David Adams. Creation Myths of the World: An Encyclopedia, Volume 1, “Miwok“.

Rain.org, “The Rainbow Bridge, a Chumash Legend“.

Suntree, Susan. Sacred Sites: The Secret History of Southern California.

Wikipedia, “Miwok Mythology“.

Goddess Mama Kilya

“Mama Quilla” by Lisa Hunt

“Mama Kilya’s themes are fire, the sun, cycles, spring, time, divination, health and prosperity. Her symbols are fire and golden/yellow items. In Incan tradition, Mama Kilya regulates the festival calendar and all matters of time. She is also a prophetic Goddess, often warning of impending danger through eclipses. When these occur, one should make as much noise a possible to frighten away evil influences.

Because they live south of the equator, Incans consider today, which for them is the spring equinox, the sun’s birthday.  Follow with tradition and rise early today to catch the first rays of the sun as they come over the horizon. These rays hold the Goddess’s blessing for health, prosperity, and timeliness.

Another customary practice today was that of sun and fire divinations. If the sun in shining, sit beneath a tree and watch the patterns it creates in the shadows and light. Keep a question in mind as you watch, and see what images Mama Kilya creates in response. Make note of these and look them up in dream symbol books or any guide to imagery for potential interpretive values.

Should the weather be poor, place any yellow-colored herbs on a fire source and watch what happens. Popping and flying indicates lots of energy and a positive response. Smouldering indicates anger and an iffy response. Finally, flames dying out completely is a negative-definitely don’t move forward on this one.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Goddess: Mama Quilla” by Dylan Meconis

“Mama Quilla (QuechuaMama Killa or Mama Kilya), in Inca mythology and religion, was the third power and Goddess of the moon. She was the sister and wife of Inti, daughter of Viracocha and mother of Manco Cápac and Mama Ocllo, mythical founders of the Inca empire and culture. She was the Goddess of marriage and the menstrual cycle, and considered a defender of women. She was also important for the Inca calendar.

Myths surrounding Mama Quilla include that She cried tears of silver and that lunar eclipses were caused when She was being attacked by an animal. She was envisaged in the form of a beautiful woman and Her temples were served by dedicated priestesses.” [1]

Patricia Monaghan writes: “In ancient Peru, [Mama Quilla] was the name of the moon Goddess, imagined as a silver disk with a woman’s face.  ‘Mother Moon’ was honored at regular calendar-fixed rituals, especially held during eclipses, when a supernatural jaguar attempted to devour Her” (p. 206).

“Mama Quilla” by Ramona Frederickson

“[Another] myth surrounding the moon was to account for the ‘dark spots‘; it was believed that a fox fell in love with Mama Quilla because of Her beauty, but when he rose into the sky, She squeezed him against Her, producing the patches.  The Incas would fear lunar eclipses as they believed that during the eclipse, an animal (possibly a mountain lion, serpent or puma) was attacking Mama Quilla. Consequently, people would attempt to scare away the animal by throwing weapons, gesturing and making as much noise as possible. They believed that if the animal achieved its aim, then the world would be left in darkness. This tradition continued after the Incas had been converted to Catholicism by the Conquistadors, which the Spanish used to their advantage. The natives showed the Spanish great respect when they found that they were able to predict when the eclipses would take place.” [2]

 

 

 

Sources:

Monaghan, Patricia. The New Book of Goddesses and Heroines, “Papa Quilla”.

Wikipedia, “Mama Quilla“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Agaliha. Mysticwicks.com, “Mama Quilla {Goddess of the Week}“.

Bingham, Ann & Jeremy Roberts. South and Meso-American Mythology A to Z, “Mama Quilla“.

Browne, Sylvia. Mother God: The Feminine Principle to Our Creator.

Conway, Deanna J. Moon Magick: Myth & Magic, Crafts & Recipes, Rituals & Spells.

Friedman, Amy. Uexpress.com, “Tell Me a Story: The People of the Sun (an Incan Myth)“.

Hunt, Lisa. Celestial Goddesses: An Illustrated Meditation Guide, “Mama Quilla“.

Shewhodreams.weebly.com, “Mama Quilla“.

Waldherr, Kris. Goddess Inspiration Oracle, “Mama Quilla“.

Goddess Papa

“Inward Journey” by Gilbert Williams

“Papa’s themes are providence, thankfulness, abundance, earth, fertility, weather, grounding, the harvest and the moon. Her symbols are the moon, harvested foods, rainwater and rocks.  Polynesians summon Papa to help in all earthly matters. She is, in fact, the Earth Mother who gave birth to all things by making love to the sky. To this day, the earth and sky remain lovers, the sky giving its beloved rain for fertilization. Papa is sometimes known by the alternative title Papa Raharaha, ‘supporting rock’, through which She provides foundations and sustenance for our body, mind, and spirit.

Harvest moon festivals take place during the full moon closest to the autumnal equinox. The full moon here represents the earth (Papa) in all its abundance and the crop’s maturity. If it’s raining today, skip an umbrella for a moment and enjoy a little of the sky’s love for Papa. Gather a little of the water and drink it to encourage more self-love.

Carry any crystal or stone with you today to manifest Papa’s firm foundations in all your endeavors. And definitely integrate harvested foods into your menu. Some that have lunar affiliations include cauliflower, cabbage, cucumber, grapes, lettuce, potatoes, and turnips. Thank Papa for Her providence before you eat, then ingest whatever lunar qualities you need for that day or for the rest of the year.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Papahanaumoku (literally, broad place who gives birth to islands), or Pāpā, is the name of the Kanaka Maoli creator Goddess in Hawaiian mythology. Together with Her husband Wākea (sky father) Pāpā is the ancestor of all people and Kalo, and mother of islands as the Kanaka Maoli manifestation of Mother Earth.” [1]

“Papa & Wakea” by Linda Rowell Stevens

Patricia Monaghan writes: “The word we use for father was used by the Polynesians to summon mother earth, who existed from the beginning in perpetual intercourse with Her lover, the say god Rangi.  They left no room between them, creating darkness everywhere, which stifled the gods that resulted from the divine union.  Finally, the young gods decided to separate their parents.  Although apart, the pair remained lovers still; the earth’s damp heat rose lustfully to the sky, and the rain fell from heaven to fertilize beloved Papa” (p. 248).

Kalo, also known as the taro plant.

“There are many legends surrounding Papa…According to [one] legend, Papahanaumoku was born in Halawa Valley, Oʻahu and spent Her early childhood there. She travelled throughout the islands, and eventually wed Wakea. Together they had a daughter, Hoʻohokukalani (literally, one who creates the stars of heaven). As the girl grew, Wakea fell in love with his daughter and began to have an intimate relationship with her. He tricked Papa (in some versions of the story, the institution of the kapu system was part of his scheme) in order to keep Her away, so that he could seduce Hoʻohokukalani. When Papa discovered the truth, She was furious. However, when Hoʻohokukalani gave birth to a stillborn baby, it was Papa who named the child Haloa and buried him in the soft earth; from that place sprung the first kalo. Hoʻohokukalani again mated with her father Wakea, and had a living child, who was also named Haloa. This child became the ancestor to all Kanaka Maoli, or all humans (depending upon interpretation). [2]

“Papahanaumoku is worshipped by Native Hawaiians, especially by women, as a primordial force of creation who has the power to give life and to heal. A women’s temple, called Hale o Papa, is the primary religious structure associated with Her worship. Hale o Papa are often built in connection with Luakini, or men’s temples (places of ‘official’ ceremony, which are primarily dedicated to the gods  and Lono), although it is believed by many practitioners that they may also exist independently.

Widespread destruction of religious structures by the forces of Kahekili II and by the Christian-converted kahuna, Hewahewa have made archaeological proof of many known sites difficult. Some also question the possibility of regular ‘covering up’ and/or ‘minimizing’ of archaeological and historical data, due to the impact of this data on development interests and other economically powerful factors.” [3]

“In the Aloha ʻAina movement, Papa is often a central figure, as Her spirit is that of the life-giving, loving, forgiving earth who nurtures human life, and who is being abused by the misdeeds of mankind, especially in regard to the abuse of nature.

Papahānaumokuākea MNM approximate boundary outlined

In 2008, Papahanaumoku and Wakea’s names inspired the newly inaugurated Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.” [4]

 

 

 

Sources:

Monaghan, Patricia. The New Book of Goddesses and Heroines, “Papa”.

Wikipedia, “Papahanaumoku“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Donch.com, “Heiau: Native Hawaiian Temples“.

Hawaiialive.org, “Moku‘ula“.

Powersthatbe.com, “Goddess Papa“.

Sacred-texts.com, “Papa and Wakea“.

Wikipedia, “Rangi and Papa

 

Goddess Genetaska

“Eternal GIft” by Lee Bogle

“Genetaska’s themes are tradition and unity. Her symbols are amalgams (any item that mixes different components into a useful, harmonious blend).  Since the Crow Fair has become a meeting ground in Montana for various tribes, we look to Genetaska to make the day productive and celebratory. As the Iroquois Mother of Nations, She not only created human diversity but also maintains the peace within it.

Since 1918, a great gathering of Native American tribes has taken place in Crow Agency, Montana. Here people meet, dance and revel in native traditions. While the event is hosted by the Crow Tribe, others attend from tirbes as diverse as Inuit and Aztec. In keeping with this theme and to invoke Genetaska’s harmony in your life, make peace with yourself or someone from whom you’ve been estranged. Ask Genetaska to help you find forgiveness in your heart.

Also, listen to some Native American music today, or maybe visit a museum that includes Native American exhibits to enjoy Genetaska’s diversity. She lives within Her people’s artistic expressions of individuality and vision.

Finally, make a stew that includes squash and corn (two traditional Native American foods). Stir the stew clockwise and invoke Genetaska, saying,

‘Diversity and harmony, as I eat, abide in me!’

The Goddess will mix and mingle the food to magical perfection.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“The Secret” by Lee Bogle

According to Mythologydictionary.com, Genetaska was “a Seneca virgin appointed by the Five Nations to settle disputes. Two braves, one of the Oneida, the other of the Onondaga, asked her to settle an argument over a deer which each claimed to have killed. Both fell in love with her and wanted to marry her but, bound by vows of chastity, she refused, even though she loved the Oneida brave. When winter came, he returned, pale and worn from longing and she assented to his proposal. The elders, feeling betrayed, refused to appoint another Peace Queen and the tribes went back to quarrelling. Identified as Peace Queen or The Peace Queen” [1] or “Maiden Peace Queen” (Monaghan, p. 133).

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

Monaghan, Patricia. The New Book of Goddesses and Heroines, “Genetaska”.

Mythologydictionary.com,Genetaska“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Canfield, William Walker. The Legends of the Iraquois: told by “the Cornplanter”.

Firstpeople.us, “Native American Legends – The Peace Queen“.

Goddess Xmucane

“Xmucane – Her themes are time, cycles, creativity and divination. Her symbols are calendars, blue-green items and light.  This Mayan Goddess of time created time’s calculation and the calendar along with Her partner Xpiyacoc. She continues watching over all calendar functions and acts as a prophetess because she can see both past and future consecutively. Her folkloric titles include Day’s Grandmother and Maker of the Blue-Green Bowl (likely the sky).

Mayans believe the universe began on this date in 3114 B.C.E. They also teach that time will end on December 23, 2012. Exactly what this means in terms of human evolution is left to the imagination. In either case, today is a time for fresh beginnings. Call upon Xmucane to bless your appointment book and help you make the most productive possible use of your time. Try this mini-ritual:

Light a blue-green candle secured in a bowl and place it behind our calendar. Hold your hands palms-down over the datebook and say,

‘Lady of time, see where I stand in your stream.
Grant me the perspective with which to move forward confidently,
using each day on this earth to grow and learn the ways of the Goddess.
Inspire my efforts to transform every moment of my life with positive magic.
Today, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, let my moments be filled with you.
So be it.’

Blow out the candle and keep it for other rites.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

Xmucan (pronounced SHMO-cane) was “the Maya Goddess of childbirth. She was the consort of Xpiyacoc (god of marriage), and the mother of One Hunahpu and Seven Hunahpu (mighty warriors).” [1]

“Xmucane and Xpiacoc (alternatively Xumucane and Ixpiyacoc) are the names of the divine grandparents of Maya mythology and the daykeepers of the Popol Vuh. They are considered to be the oldest of all the gods of the Maya pantheon, and are identified by a number of names throughout the Maya sacred text, reflecting their multiple roles throughout the Mayan creation myth. They are usually mentioned together, although Xmucane seems to be alone during most of the interactions with the Maya Hero Twins, when She is referred to as simply ‘grandmother’.

The pair were invoked during the creation of the world in which the Maya gods were attempting to create humanity. Xmucane and Xpiacoc ground the corn that was used in part of the failed attempt, although the beings created were described as being simply mannequins and not real people. These two are also invoked, often by other powerful deities, for their powers in divination and matchmaking.

“Bag of Corn” by Molybdenum-Blues

Xmucane Herself also plays an integral role in the development of the Maya Hero Twins. She was at first wary of them and their mother, Xquic, and ordered them out of Her house when they were yet infants, but She would come to accept them almost as Her own sons, raising and caring for them.

Twin brothers from the Mayan legend of creation by John Jude

Xmucane is considered by some to be the Goddess associated with the waxing moon, contrasting to the hypothetical role of Her daughter-in-law as the waning moon.” [2]

“Triple Goddess – Crone” by TwistedSwans

 

 

Sources:

Marks, Dominic. Lowchensaustralia.com, “Mayan Goddesses“.

Wikipedia, “Xmucane and Xpiacoc“.

 

Suggested Links:

Gallardo, Susana. SJSU WOMS 101, “Day 3 – Popol Vuh“.

MXTODIS123. An Inner Journey: The Moon, Mythology, and You, “Xmucane“.

Nathan. Vovatia.wordpress.com, “Oh, Maya Gods!“.

Sabrina. Goddess A Day, “Xmucane“.

Goddess Selu

“Selu’s themes are the harvest, the weather and growth. Her symbol is corn.  This Southeastern Native American corn Goddess planted Her very heart so people wouldn’t go hungry. Corn sprouted from it. To this day, Her spirit teaches us how to refertilize the earth to bring us the sustenance we need.

In this primary festival (the Fiesta de Santa Clara) among the Pueblo Native Americans, Santa Clara replaced Selu, the spirit of the corn, when Christianity took hold. For the Pueblo, corn is a staple, so as the sun reigns in power they dance for rain and evoke the Corn Spirit for every portion of the crop’s growth. Following this tradition, if it’s raining today, go outside and rejoice in Selu’s growth-related energy. Dance with a bit of cron (or eat some beforehand) to invoke her powers for progress in any area of your life.

If your region has needed rain lately, try drumming for it while scattering corn kernels mingled with pine needles on the ground. The corn and needles act as a gift to the Godedss and the sound they make is a kind of sympathetic magic to draw the rain.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Corn Dawn Mother” by Marti Fenton

“Selu is the Cherokee (Tsalagi language) name for the Corn Mother who is worshiped by nearly all Native American tribes. She is called by many names but almost all literally translate to ‘Corn Mother’ ‘Corn Maiden’ or ‘Corn Woman’ (see my July 2 entry on “Corn Mother“). Often the name the Corn Mother Goddess is known by is used as the common word for ‘corn’ as well. Selu is the Goddess of the Harvest of course, but also wisdom, magic, hunting (as the wife of Kanati the God of the Hunt,) and various other domains. She was often the most honored ‘Mother’ Goddess among many tribes including the Cherokee.

The Aztec called her Chicomecoatl and She was their the Goddess of Corn and of all Fertility (of crops, livestock, wild animals, and people’s own fertility.)During one month the Goddess of ‘maize’ (Corn) was the patron deity in the religious celebrations. The main corn blessing rite was led by many Priestesses each carrying seven ears of corn wrapped in fancy cloth on their backs, wearing fancy make-up and feather decorated dresses. At the setting of the sun the Priestesses threw colored corn into the crowds, symbolizing the Corn Goddess Chicomecoatl’s blessing the tribe with fertility for the coming harvest season.

The Hopi called Her ‘Qocha Mana.’ That tribe also has one of the most beautiful Corn Woman tales. They say that it took place long long ago. The men of the village had went out on a hunt. It was mid-winter and there was only a little food in left the village. The women and children stayed behind to wait their return. The men were due to return in three sunsets time but got lost in the snow storm. The menfolk were gone for 20 sunsets instead and when they returned home, all the children ran out to greet them. The men were happy to see the children but were perplexed that their wives and sweethearts were not coming out to greet them. As they entered the village, they found all of the women dead. They rationed the food out to only the children thus sacrificed themselves so that their children could live on. The village shaman told the men ‘We must dance the Dance of Thanksgiving, for the bounty we have returned with’. The men protested, ‘How can we have a Thanksgiving Dance with all of our women dead?’ The Shaman simply said, ‘Trust in the Gods.’

“Corn Dawn Maiden” by Marti Fenton (White Deer Song)

As the men prepared for the Thanksgiving Dance that night the Creator came to the Shaman. She told him to do something unbelievable. She told him to bury all of the women. Furthermore, She directed for the women to be buried together in a single shallow grave. The next morning all of the woman were buried as directed by the Mother Goddess. That night, the men and the children danced the Thanksgiving Dance with heavy hearts. The Creator caused a great sleep to come over the village and sent a wonderful God to the village. The God was tall handsome and entertaining comical fellow who played a flute. He went to the grave and started to play his flute. He bent over the grave and as he played, tears feel from his eyes. These tears became seeds of corn as he played and cried. At the end of 20 sunsets our Creator said to him, ‘Kokopelli, you shall forever remain hunched over as a tribute to the maidens who will forever be known as the Corn Women. Your tears of sympathy have become seeds of lifegiving corn.

Thus, it is told that the Hopi shall never go hungry again for Kokopelli and the Corn Women have given the tribe life through the sacred corn.” [1]

 

 

 

Sources:

Cyber Temples of the Gods, “Selu’s (the Corn Mother’s) Temple“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Britannica Online Encyclopedia, “Corn Mother“.

Cornmother.com, “The Corn Mother“.

First People – the Legends, “Corn Mother – Penobscot“.

Goddessrealm.com, “Corn Mother Goddess of Nourishment“.

Goddesses and Gods, “Goddess Corn Mother“.

Hrana Janto, Illustration & Illumination, “Corn Maiden“.

Native-languages.org, “Legendary Native American Figures: Selu“.

Raine, Lauren. Threads of the Spiderwoman, “Corn Mother and Collaboration“.

Return of the Corn Mothers

Sidhe, Fiana. Matrifocus, “Goddess in the Wheel of the Year – The Corn Mother“.

Tanith. Order of the White Moon, “Corn Woman, Goddess of Nourishment“.

Two Worlds, Waynonaha. Weed Wanderings, “Wise Woman Wisdom…Corn Woman“.

 

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