Tag Archive: meteorite stones


Goddess Wohpe

“White Buffalo Woman” by Barbara Ann Brown

“Wohpe’s themes are wishes, peace, beauty, pleasure, cycles, time and meditation. Her symbols are falling stars, sweetgrass and peace pipes.  This Lakota Goddess’s name literally means ‘meteor’. Among the Lakota She is considered the most beautiful of all Goddesses. She generates harmony and unity through the peace pipe and pleasure from the smoke of sweetgrass. Stories also tell us that She measured time and created the seasons so people could know when to perform sacred rituals. When a meteor falls from the sky, it is Wohpe mediating on our behalf.

Go stargazing! At this time of year, meteors appear in the region of the Perseids, as they have since first spotted in 800 A.D. People around the world can see these (except for those who live at the South Pole). If you glimpse a shooting star, tell Wohpe what message you want Her to take back to heaven for you.

To generate Wohpe’s peace between yourself and another (or a group of people) get some sweetgrass (or lemon grass) and burn it on any safe fire source. As you do, visualize the person or people with whom you hope to create harmony. Blow the smoke in the direction where this person lives, saying,

‘Wohpe, bear my message sure; keep my intentions ever pure.
Where anger dwells, let there be peace. May harmony never cease.’

Afterwards, make an effort to get ahold of that person and reopen lines of communication.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Buffalo Maiden” by David Penfound

“In Lakota mythology, Wóȟpe (less correctly spelled ‘Wohpe’) is a Goddess of peace, the daughter of Wi and the Moon, Haŋhépi-Wi. She was the wife of the south wind. When She visited the Earth, She gave the Dakota Native Americans (Sioux) a pipe as a symbol of peace. Later, Wóȟpe became the White Buffalo Calf Woman. An alternative name for Wóȟpe is Ptehíŋčalasaŋwiŋ.” [1]

“White Buffalo Calf Woman” by Lynne Foster Fife

Here is one story of White Buffalo Woman, “the Lakota Goddess of secret knowledge. Also called Ptesan-Wi, (which translates as ‘White Buffalo Calf Woman’), She appeared one day to two hunters. She was dressed all in white and carried a small bundle on Her back. One of the men was overcome with lust for Her, but the second man recognized that this was no ordinary woman. The first man approached White Buffalo Woman, intending to embrace Her, and She smiled at him. No sooner had he reached Her than a white cloud of mist surrounded them. When the mist cleared away, nothing was left of the man but his bones. White Buffalo Woman explained to his companion that She only given him what he had desired, and in that moment he had lived a lifetime, died, and decayed.

 

The second hunter was sent back to his village to prepare the way for White Buffalo Woman. She told the people that She had come from Heaven in order to teach them the seven sacred rituals–the sweat lodge, the naming ceremony, the healing ceremony, the adoption ceremony, the marriage ceremony, the vision quest, and the sundance ceremony. From the bundle on Her back, She gave the people all the tools they would need for the rituals, including the chununpa, the sacred pipe. She taught of the connection of all life, and the importance of honoring Mother Earth. White Buffalo Woman told the people that She would return to them when needed, to restore their spirituality and harmony with the land.

 

As she walked away from the village, She looked back and sat down. When She stood again, She had become a black buffalo, signifying the direction west and the element earth. After walking a little further, She lay down again, this time rising as a yellow buffalo, signifying east and the sun. A third time, She walked, lay down, and arose as a red buffalo, signifying south and water. Finally, She rose as a white buffalo, signifying north and air. With one last look back at the people, She galloped off and disappeared.” [2]

“White Buffalo Calf Woman” by Mary Selfridge

 

ASSOCIATIONS (White Buffalo Calf Woman):

General: White buffalo, peace-pipe, circle (hoop), and the numbers 4 and 7.

Animals: Buffalo and bison, eagle and hawk.

Plants: Buttercup, pulsatilla (Pasque flower), and spruce.

Perfumes/Scents: Sage, wisteria, tangerine, and rose geranium.

Gems and Metals: Agate, rose quartz, gold, silver, and red clay.

Colors: White, yellow, red, and black.                        [3]

 

“White Buffalo Calf Woman” by Cher Lyn

“Wohpe as peace represents harmony, meditation and cycles of time.  Sacred stone of Wóȟpe is turquoise that ranges in color from sky blue to blue-green and green. This stone has been prized for centuries and was used in ancient Egypt, Persia for jewelry and amulets. Also was known and used by the Aztecs and other people of South and Central America, but is probably better known because of its use by North American native peoples. For them it was prized by medicine men who used it for healing, to bring rain and for protection. It has also long been a symbol for friendship, some say one should either give or receive it as a gift for the magic to work.” [4]

 

 

In an interview for White Buffalo: An American Prophecy, Arby Little Soldier comments on the birth of a sacred White Buffalo – Lightning Medicine Cloud – on the Lakota Ranch in Texas, and what it means for humanity.

 

Sadly, this buffalo calf was killed and butchered back in April 2012 (click here to read the story).  As far as I know, the killers are still at large.

 

 

 

Chief Arvol Looking Horse, 19th generation Keeper of the Sacred White Buffalo Calf Pipe is the leader of the Lakota Dakota Nakota Oyate, the great Sioux nation and is a man with a vision.  Here in this video, he has a great urgent message to all world religious and spiritual leaders

 

 

 

Sources:

Wikipedia, “Wohpe“.

Goddessgift.com, “Goddess Symbols of White Buffalo Calf Woman“.

Sabrina. Goddess A Day, “White Buffalo Woman“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Chasing Horse, Joseph. Native American Indian Resources, “White Buffalo Calf Woman“.

Consciouslyconnecting.blog.com, “White Bison Prophesy: A Sign from the Spirits“.

Crystalinks.com, “White Buffalo Calf Woman“.

Gaeagoddessgathering.com, White Buffalo Calf Woman – Walk Your Talk“.

Goddessgift.com, “White Buffalo Calf Woman: The Mother of Life”.

Legendsofamerica.com, “Lakota Story of Wohpe (by HinTamaheca)“.

Lightningmedicinecloud.com, “The Legend & Importance of the White Buffalo“.

Sioux.org, “Lakota Sioux Creation Myth – Wind Cave Story“.

Walker, James R. Lakota Belief and Ritual.

White Buffalo Calf Woman Society, Inc.

White Buffalo Woman – Resource Page (TCG).

WhiteBuffaloCalfWoman.org.

Whitehorse, Peace. Order of the White Moon, “White Buffalo Calf Woman“.

Wikipedia, “White Buffalo Calf Woman“.

University of California, “Lakota Ceremony“.

Goddess Cybele

“Cybele” by Pamela Matthews

“Cybele’s themes are love, health, humor, victory, strength and relationships.  Her symbols are pine, meteorite stones and keys.  A black stone that personified this Roman earth Goddess is credited with a successful battle against Hannibal. It is this strength, especially in difficult relationships, that Cybele augments in us as this month draws to a close.

Legend tells us that Cybele loved a shepherd named Attis, who went mad and killed himself. Cybelle, in distress, asked Jupiter to restore him. Jupiter responded by making Attis into a pine tree. Symbolically, this allowed him to eternally embrace Cybele, with his roots in the earth.

Following the story of Cybelle and Attis, Hilaria begins in sorrow over Attis’s death and ends in joy. Today, laughter and fun activities are considered healthy. So, rent a good comedy flick, go out to a comedy club, or do something that really uplifts your spirit. Your laughter invokes Cybele’s attention and blessings.

To create stability in a relationship, make this Cybele charm:

Take an iron key (or a piece of iron and any old key bound together). Hold them in your strong hand, visualizing the key being filled with radiant red light (love’s color). Say:

‘Cybele, let this key to our hearts be filled
Love and devotion her instilled.’

 Wear the key on a long chain so it rests over your heart chakra.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

The famous leopard-enthroned Goddess from the granary at Çatal Hüyuk, close to 6000 BCE.

Cybele was an originally Anatolian form of Earth Mother or Great Mother. Little is known of Her oldest Anatolian cults, other than Her association with mountains, hawks and lions. She was Phrygia‘s State deity; Her Phrygian cult was adopted and adapted by Greek colonists of Anatolian Asia Minor, and spread from there to mainland Greece and its more distant western colonies from around the 6th century BCE.

“Also known as Kybele and Magna Mater and the Mother of the Gods, the worship of this Goddess spread throughout the Roman Empire. As a Phrygian deity, She was a Goddess of caverns, of the Earth in its primitive state; worshipped on mountain tops. She ruled over wild beasts, and was also a bee Goddess.  Cybele was the Goddess of nature and fertility. Because Cybele presided over mountains and fortresses, Her crown was in the form of a city wall.

Her Greek mythology counterpart was Rhea.” [1]

“Cybele” by Picot

In Greece, Cybele met with a mixed reception. She was partly assimilated to aspects of Gaia (the “Earth”), Her Minoan equivalent Rhea, and the Corn-Mother Goddess Demeter. Some city-states, notably Athens, evoked Her as a protector but Her most celebrated Greek rites and processions show Her as an essentially foreign, exotic mystery-Goddess, who arrives in a lion-drawn chariot to the accompaniment of wild music, wine, and a disorderly, ecstatic following. Uniquely in Greek religion, She had a transgendered or eunuch mendicant priesthood. Many of Her Greek cults included rites to Her divine “Phrygian” castrate shepherd-consort Attis, whose rites and myths appear to have been Greek inventions. In Greece, Cybele is associated with mountains, town and city walls, fertile nature, and wild animals, especially lions.

In Rome, Cybele was known as Magna Mater (“Great Mother”). The Roman State adopted and developed a particular form of Her cult, and claimed Her conscription as a key religious component in their success against Carthage during the Punic Wars. They also reinvented Her as a Trojan Goddess, and thus as an ancestral Goddess of the Roman people by way of the Trojan prince Aeneas, in Rome’s foundation myth. With Rome’s eventual hegemony over the Mediterranean world, Romanised forms of Cybele’s cults spread throughout the Roman Empire. The meaning and morality of Her cults and priesthoods were topics of debate and dispute in Greek and Roman literature, and remain so in modern scholarship.

Dionysius of Halicarnassus records that specific laws were passed when some of the undesirable aspects of the Cybele cult became apparent. Cybele’s religion was a bloody cult that required its priests and priestesses as well as followers to cut themselves during some rituals. The priests castrated themselves at their initiation; there was wild music, chanting, and frenzied dancing.  “As part of their worship, priests also performed mysterious rites in Her honor. Of particular note was the sacrifice of a bull performed as part of an initiation into Cybele’s cult. This ritual was known as the taurobolium, and during the rite a candidate for initiation stood in a pit under a floor with a wooden grate. The bull was sacrificed above the grate, and the blood ran through holes in the wood, showering the initiate. This was a form of ritual purification and rebirth.” [2]

Atia undergoing the taurobolium from HBO/BBC’s series “Rome”

Along with Her consort, the vegetation god Attis, Cybele was worshipped in wild, emotional, bloody, orgiastic, cathartic ceremonies.  Her annual spring festival celebrated the death and resurrection of Her beloved Attis.  During the Republic and early Empire, festival days were celebrated with eunuchs priests, called Corybantes,  preceding the Goddess through the streets, banging cymbals and drums, wearing bright attire and heavy jewelry, their hair long and ‘greased’.  Priests and priestesses were segregated, their activities confined to their temples, and Roman citizens were not allowed to walk in procession with them. Neither Roman citizens nor their slaves were allowed to become priests or priestess in the cult. No native-born Roman citizen was to be allowed to dress in bright colors, beg for alms, walk the streets with flute players or worship the Goddess in ‘wild Phrygian ceremonies’. Those Romans who wanted to continue to worship the Goddess set up secret societies known as sodalitates so they could dine together in the Goddess’ honor. [3] [4]

“The Cult of Cybele has frequently been looked upon as a mystery religion, similar to the Cults of Isis and Demeter. Cybele, however, was completely unlike those two positive and loving Mother Goddesses. Indeed, Cybele appears to have come out of a completely different mold. In fact, Cybele was so completely opposite from Isis, that it is impossible to imagine her even being in the presence of children, much less breast-feeding one. It is extremely doubtful, as well, whether anyone could ever picture Cybele wandering through and nurturing the green fields and peaceful forests of Earth.” [5]

 

Please click here for a very comprehensive article on Cybele, the Great Phrygian Mother Goddess.

Sources:

A Journal of a Poet – The Goddess As My Muse, “Cybele, the Great Phrygian Mother Goddess“.

KET Distance Learing, “The Cult of Cybele“.

Smart, Anthony E. Encyclopedia Mythica, “Cybele“.

Wigington, Patti. About.com: Paganism/Wicca, “Cybele, Mother Goddess of Rome“.

Wikipedia, “Cybele“.

Suggested Links:

Kybele: Gourmet Food Production, “Goddess Kybele”.

The Linen Press, “Cybele“.

MaatRaAh. The Church of the Most High Goddess, “Pagan Goddess of the Sibyl and Cybele Oracle“.

Roman Empire & Colosseum, “Myths about the Roman Goddess Cybele“.

Source Memory, “Cultural Continuities: Goddess of the Feline Throne“.

Theoi Greek Mythology, “Kybele“.

Welcome to the Temple of Cybele.

Women in Greek Myths, “Cybele, Agdistis, and Attis“.

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