Tag Archive: karma


Goddess Srinmo

“Srinmo’s themes karma, Universal Law, excellence, sports and cycles. Her symbols are the wheel and boomerang. In Tibet, this Goddess holds the Great Round, a cosmic wheel upon which the movement of human life is recorded with each thought, word, and deed. Srinmo’s demonic visage represents the human fear of death and reminds that one should strive for good in this life for the beauty it brings now and n our next incarnation.

In Virginia, the Boomerang Festival is a festival of skill centering on the ancient boomerangs believed to have been used originally by the Egyptians.

Metaphysically speaking, the boomerang’s movement represents the threefold law and Srinmo’s karmic balance (i.e., everything you send out returns to you thrice).
To give yourself a greater understanding of this principle, or to recognize the cycles in your life that may need changing, carry any round object today, such as a coin. Put it in your pocket, saying

‘What goes around comes around.’

Pay particular attention to your routine and the way you interact with people all day, and see what Srinmo reveals to you.

For aiding the quest for enlightenment, and generally improving karma through light-filled living, try this little incantation in the car each time you make a right-hand turn today:

‘As I turn to the right,
I move closer to the Light!'”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

Today’s research comes from a fantastic piece written by  Victor & Victoria Trimondi; and the following excerpt is the story of the bondage of the earth Goddess Srinmo and the history of the origin of Tibet.  “According to Tibetan tradition, the whole Tibetan territory can be represented as a vast wild female demon lying on her back facing East and stretching her limbs all over the country. The accounts of this conception are found in several Tibetan texts that originated between the twelfth and fourteenth centuries, including the famous terma-revealed chronicle Maṇi Kabum (ma ni bka’ ‘bum, 12th century) and above cited chronicle The Clear Mirror (rgyal rabs gsal ba’i me long) written by the great scholar Södnam Gyaltsen (bsod nams rgyal mtshan, 1312-1375).” [1]

“The Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara is considered the progenitor of the Tibetans, he thus determines events from the very beginning. In the period before there were humans on earth, the Buddha being was embodied in a monkey and passed the time in deep meditation on the ‘Roof of the World‘. There, as if from nowhere, a rock demoness by the name of Srinmo appeared. The hideous figure was a descendent of the Srin clan, a bloodthirsty community of nature Goddesses. ‘Spurred on by horniness’ — as one text puts it — She too assumed the form of a (female) monkey and tried over seven days to seduce Avalokiteshvara. But the divine Bodhisattva monkey withstood all temptations and remained untouched and chaste. As he continued to refuse on the eighth day, Srinmo threatened him with the following words: ‘King of the monkeys, listen to me and what I am thinking. Through the power of love, I very much love you. Through this power of love I woo you, and confess: If you will not be my spouse, I shall become the rock demon’s companion. If countless young rock demons then arise, every morning they will take thousands upon thousands of lives. The region of the Land of Snows itself will take on the nature of the rock demons. All other forms of life will then be consumed by the rock demons. If I myself then die as a consequence of my deed, these living beings will be plunged into hell. Think of me then, and have pity’ (Hermanns, 1956, p. 32). With this she hit the bullseye. ‘Sexual intercourse out of compassion and for the benefit of all suffering beings’ was — as we already know — a widespread ‘ethical’ practice in Mahayana Buddhism. Despite this precept, the monkey first turned to his emanation father, Amitabha, and asked him for advice. The ‘god of light from the West’ answered him with wise foresight: ‘Take the rock demoness as your consort. Your children and grandchildren will multiply. When they have finally become humans, they will be a support to the teaching’ (Hermanns, 1956, p. 32).

Nevertheless, this Buddhist evolutionary account, reminiscent of Charles Darwin, did not just arise from the compassionate gesture of a divine monkey; rather, it also contains a widely spread, elitist value judgement by the clergy, which lets the Tibetans and their country be depicted as uncivilized, underdeveloped and animal-like, at least as far as the negative influence of their primordial mother is concerned. ‘From their father they are hardworking, kind, and attracted to religious activity; from their mother they are quick-tempered, passionate, prone to jealousy and fond of play and meat’, an old text says of the inhabitants of the Land of Snows (Samuel, 1993, p. 222).

Two forces thus stand opposed to one another, right from the Tibetan genesis: the disciplined, restrained, culturally creative, spiritual world of the monks in the form of Avalokiteshvaraand the wild, destructive energy of the feminine in the figure of Srinmo.

In a further myth, non-Buddhist Tibet itself appears as the embodiment of Srinmo (Janet Gyatso, 1989, p. 44). The local demoness is said to have resisted the introduction of the true teaching by the Buddhist missionaries from India with all means at Her disposal, with weaponry and with magic, until She was ultimately defeated by the great king of law, Songtsen Gampo (617-650), an incarnation of Avalokiteshvara (and thus of the current Dalai Lama). ‘The lake in the Milk plane,’ writes the Tibet researcher Rolf A. Stein, ‘where the first Buddhist king built his temple (the Jokhang), represented the heart of the demoness, who lay upon Her back. The demoness is Tibet itself, which must first be tamed before She can be inhabited and civilized. Her body still covers the full extent of Tibet in the period of its greatest military expansion (eighth to ninth century C.E.). Her spread-eagled limbs reached to the limits of Tibetan settlement … In order to keep the limbs of the defeated demoness under control, twelve nails of immobility were hammered into Her’ (Stein, 1993, p.34). A Buddhist temple was raised at the location of each of these twelve nailings.

Mysterious stories circulate among the Tibetans which tell of a lake of blood under the Jokhang, which is supposed to consist of Srinmo’s heart blood. Anyone who lays his ear to the ground in the cathedral, the sacred center of the Land of Snows, can still — many claim — hear Her faint heartbeat. A comparison of this unfortunate female fate with the subjugation of the Greek dragon, Pythonat Delphi immediately suggests itself. Apollothe god of light (Avalokiteshvara), let the earth-monster, Python (Srinmo), live once he had defeated it so that it would prophesy for him, and built over the mistreated body at Delphi the most famous oracle temple in Greece.

The earth demoness is nailed down with phurbas. These are ritual daggers with a three-sided blade and a vajra handle. We know these already from the Kalachakra ritual, where they are likewise employed to fixate the earth spirits and the earth mother. The authors who have examined the symbolic significance of the magic weapon are unanimous in their assessment of the aggressive phallic symbolism of the phurba.

In their view, Srinmo represents an archetypal variant of the Mother Earth figure known from all cultures, whom the Greeks called Gaia (Gaea). As nature and as woman She stands in stark contrast to the purely spiritual world of Tantric Buddhism. The forces of wilderness, which rebel against androcentric civilization, are bundled within Her. She forms the feminine shadow world in opposition to the masculine paradise of light of the shining Amitabha and his radiant emanation son, AvalokiteshvaraSrinmo symbolizes the (historical) prima materia, the matrix, the primordial earthly substance which is needed in order to construct a tantric monastic empire, then She provides the gynergy, the feminine élan vitale, with which the Land of Snows pulsates. As the vanquisher of the earth Goddess, Avalokiteshvara triumphs in the form of King Songtsen Gampo, that is, the same Bodhisattva who, as a monkey, earlier engendered with Srinmo the Tibetans in myth, and who shall later exercise absolute dominion from the ‘Roof of the World’ as Dalai Lama.

Tibet’s sacred center, the Jokhang (the cathedral of Lhasa), the royal chronicles inform us, thus stands over the pierced heart of a woman, the earth mother Srinmo. This act of nailing down is repeated at the construction of every Lamaist shrine, whether temple or monastery and regardless of where the establishment takes place — in Tibet, India, or the West. Then before the first foundation stone for the new building is laid, the tantric priests occupy the chosen location and execute the ritual piercing of the earth mother with their phurbas. Tibet’s holy geography is thus erected upon the maltreated bodies of mythic women, just as the tantric shrines of India (the shakta pithas) are found on the places where the dismembered body of the Goddess Sati fell to earth.

Srinmo with different Tibetan temples upon her body

In contrast to Her Babylonian sister, Tiamat, who was cut to pieces by Her great-grandchild, Marduk, so that outer space was formed by Her limbs, Srinmo remains alive following Her subjugation and nailing down. According to the tantric scheme, Her gynergy flows as a constant source of life for the Buddhocratic system. She thus vegetates — half dead, half alive — over centuries in the service of the patriarchal clergy. An interpretation of this process according to the criteria of the gaia thesis often discussed in recent years would certainly be most revealing. (We return to this point in our analysis of the ecological program of the Tibetans in exile.) According to this thesis, the mistreated ‘Mother Earth’ (Gaia is the popular name for the Greek earth mother) has been exploited by humanity (and the gods?) for millennia and is bleeding to death. But Srinmo is not just a reservoir of inexhaustible energy. She is also the absolute Other, the foreign, and the great danger which threatens the Buddhocratic state. Srinmo is — as we still have to prove — the mythic ‘inner enemy’ of Tibetan Lamaism, while the external mythic enemy is likewise represented by a woman, the Chinese Goddess Guanyin.

Srinmo survived — even if it was under the most horrible circumstances, yet the Tibetans also have a myth of dismemberment which repeats the Babylonian tragedy of Tiamat. Like many peoples they worship the tortoise as a symbol of Mother Earth. A Tibetan myth tells of how in the mists of time the Bodhisattva Manjushri sacrificed such a creature ‘or the benefit of all beings’. In order to form a solid foundation for the world he fired an arrow off at the tortoise which struck it in the right-hand side. The wounded animal spat fire, its blood poured out, and it passed excrement. It thus multiplied the elements of the new world. Albert Grünwedel presents this myth as evidence for the “tantric female sacrifice” in the Kalachakra ritual: ‘The tortoise which Manjushri shot through with a long arrow … [is] just another form of the world woman whose inner organs are depicted by the dasakaro vasi figure [the Power of Ten]’ (Grünwedel, 1924, vol. II, p. 92).

The relation of Tibetan Buddhism to the Goddess of the earth or of the country (Tibet) is also one of brutal subjugation, an imprisonment, an enslavement, a murder or a dismemberment. Euphemistically, and in ignorance of the tantric scheme of things it could also be interpreted as a civilizing of the wilderness through culture. Yet however the relation is perceived — no meeting, no exchange, no mutual recognition of the two forces takes place. In the depths of Tibet’s history — as we shall show — a brutal battle of the sexes is played out.” [2]

Well damn…who knew??  I really had no idea how misogynistic Buddhism was until it was brought to my attention back in mid June of this year.  A person had shared several links with me and to be honest, it was very unsettling.  One relevant link that was shared I will share here in this entry is entitled Thai Buddhism and Patriarchy by Ouyporn Khuankaew.

“Although many people believe Buddhism is an ‘egalitarian’ religion, the fact will remain that sexism/gender bias has been a very integral part of the faith for many centuries. Overall, there is less virulent anti-woman bigotry within Buddhism than many other religions, especially the Abrahamic cultus of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, but misogyny and chauvinism have been apparent enough in the Eastern faiths as well, including the Buddhist.” [3]

Man, way to pop my happy little Zen bubble, huh?

 

 

 

Sources: 

Murdock, D.M. Examiner.com, “Women in Buddhism“.

Sehnalova, Anna. 4shared.com, “The Myth of the ‘Supine Demoness’“.

Trimondi, Victor & Victoria. Trimondi.de, “2. The Dalai Lama (Avalokiteshvara) and the Demoness (Srinmo)“.

Suggested Links:

Cabezón, José Ignacio. Thlib.org, “Pabongkha Hermitage“.

O’Neill, Brendan. Reason.com, “The Truth About Tibetan Buddhism“.

Trimondi, Victor & Victoria. Trimondi.de, “Part I – 1. Buddhism and misogyny – an historical overview“.  (Here is a link to the Contents page)

Visitourchina.com, “History of Jokhang Temple“.

Wikipedia, “Women in Buddhism“.

Goddess Perimbo

“Perimbo themes are forgiveness, religious devotion, banishing, justice and karma. Her symbols are light and lunar emblems.  This Brazilian Goddess is the creatrix of all things. From Her home in the moon, Perimbo gently guides human life in benevolent ways. Balancing this kindness, She is also a Goddess of justice, meting out karmic punishment to teach important lessons when necessary.

During mid-October, the city of Belem in Brazil celebrates Círio de Nazaré and holds a parade in which people go barefoot, carrying weights and lights to banish evil, sin, and negativity from their lives.  To adapt this in a simple way and draw Perimbo’s benevolence into your living space, take a flashlight, candle, or long-stemmed match clockwise around your house, saying:

‘Perimbo, shine the light of fairness and devotion
throughout my home.’

Try to make sure the light reaches as many nooks and crannies as possible, symbolically banishing the shadows that hide there.

For a portable Perimbo charm to inspire equity in all your dealings, find a glow-in-the-dark image of the moon. Charge it up for several hours using sunlight or the flashlight from the previous spell, saying instead:

‘Perimbo, shine the light of fairness and devotion
throughout my life.’

Carry this in your pocket to radiate the Goddess’s power no matter where you may be.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

I only found a few references to today’s Goddess.  On Lowchensaustralia.com, it states: “Perimbo (Bakairi) Moon Goddess and supreme being who created the earth and all life on it. Wife of the moon god Poré.” [1]

Patricia Monaghan mentions Her in her book Encyclopedia of Goddesses and Heroines (a larger edition than the New Book of Goddesses and Heroines that I have in which Perimbo is not mentioned).  You can click here to read the preview, but the first page of the entry Her name is mentioned in is not included in the preview.

 

 

Sources:

Marks, Dominic. Lowchensaustralia.com,Goddess Names from Brazil: Perimbo“.

 

Suggested Links:

Encyclopedia of Religion Volume 13, “Yanoama and Mundurucú supreme beings” (p. 8577).

“Ti Chih Hsing Chun’s themes are learning, communication, karma and history. Her symbols are all alphabets, paper and pen or pencil.  This Goddess is the record keeper of heaven in this part of the world, making detailed notes of all good and evil deeds. As such, She makes us more aware of the importance of effective communication and keeping accurate histories. Ti Chih Hsing Chun also reminds us of how our actions (or inaction) affect all things, helping us get our karma back in balance.

This day, Hangul Day, commemorates the origination of the Korean alphabet, which became the official writing system and heralded a new age of development for the Korean people. Koreans traditionally practice handwriting (or calligraphy) on this day, which for us translates into carefully tending to your personal journal or book of shadows (your personal spell and ritual collection).

As you write, invoke the Goddess’s aid for accuracy. Also review the notes you’ve made thus far this year. Ti Chih Hsing Chun lives in those words and will show you how much your spirit has grown toward true Goddess-centered living. This awareness inspires hope, which in turn will energize your efforts through the next two months.

Finally, consider learning a new alphabet type today, such as the runes. These magical sigils provide all types of symbols to empower your spells, and they can become useful tools in expressing ideas not easily communicated with words.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

Well, I could nothing on today’s Goddess.  Based on Her description as a “record keeper of heaven making detailed notes of all good and evil deeds” and connection with karma, I believe Ti Chih Hsing Chun may be an epithet or alternate name for the Chinese Goddess Tou Mou.

Goddess Holde

“The Goddess Holda” by Carrie Kirkpatrick

“Holda’s themes are longevity, wisdom, kinship, magic, destiny and karma. Her symbols are white items and aged items. Among the Teutons, Holda is known as the White Lady, an appellation that alludes to the color of Her hair. This Goddess is the wise, ancient crone, who has learned the lessons of destiny and karma from a long, well-lived life and who bears the knowledge of magic’s deeper mysteries to us with patience and time.

In Massachusetts, the first Sunday in October is set aside to honor grandparents and their vital role in families. Customarily, grandparents (or ‘adopted’ ones) are invited for dinner and showered with attention. I think this is a lovely tradition as it stands, honoring Holda’s wisdom through the elders in our community. Go to a nearby nursing home and spend half an hour or more cheering up someone. Listen to people’s stories of days gone by, and let their insights inspire you.

To improve your own awareness of karmic law, or to increase your magical insights, wear Holda’s white (a scarf on your head would be good) or carry a white stone with you to represent Her (coral is ideal, being a stone of wisdom). Alternatively, eat some aged cheese or drink aged wine to remind yourself that ‘old’ doesn’t mean outmoded. People can become better with time and with Holda’s guidance, if we remember to appreciate the years and the people who have gone before us on this path.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Holda” by Neil Geddes-Ward

There was a ton of information on Holda to go through!  She turns out to be a very interesting and complex and all encompassing Goddess; seen as the maiden in summer sitting by a lake combing Her beautiful white hair; as mother who made the fields, animals and women fertile and protected women and children, as well as accompanying those infants who had died before they’d been named to the Other World;  and as wizened crone in the winter who was stern and despised laziness.  She also had connections with many different Goddesses, both within the Germanic and Norse pantheons and even outside: Goddesses to include Freya due to Her association with cats (appaerntly the name of the cave She lived in, Kitzkammer means ‘Cat Chamber’) and Frigga for Her associations with the household, women, spinning and children; Perchte and Berchta (which appears to be debatable to some as to whether they were the same Goddess or entirely different Beings with similar attributes); and later in post-Christian times, even Diana and Habondia as She was demonized and said to lead “a wild hunt in which She led the souls of infants who died unbaptized, witches, and heathens in general.” [1]

“Åsgårdsreien” by Peter Nicolai Arbo

In a paper written by SummerGaile, she explains that: “In Jacob Grimm’s Teutonic Mythology, Holda is spoken of as host to the Wild Hunt or ‘Wilde Heer’.  In this account She is the consort of Woden, supreme god of the Germanic tribes occupying central Europe in ancient times.   There are many variations of this story, but the themes that are most prominent are the ones that illustrate Holda leading a Wild Hunt to gather those souls that may still be lingering earth bound; and it is She who gathers them during this ride to usher them into the Other World.  Another variation of this record is that She gathers un-baptized children, or more accurately, she gathers those born and who died without having been given a birth name, and takes them safely to the Other World.” [2]  Due to Her connections with death, magic and witches, She is also sometimes associated with Hecate and Hel.

Hag by Angie (aka DeadSpider)

And of course, in the post-Christian times as we see with many independent mother Goddesses, She is transformed from Mother Holda, or “Gracious One” who helped and protected women and children into the “Goddess of the Witches” – an old ugly hag who rode a broom across the night sky; as well as many of Her symbols taking on new evil attributes: “No where is this demonization more clear than in ‘Sleeping Beauty’ where the spinning wheel and spindle are turned into symbols of evil. Many of Her other attributes were turned around as well. Her protection of the dead soul of infants was turned around to Her creeping in and stealing children from their cradles. Her image as wise old woman, instilling moral values turned to the foolish old Mother Goose who spreads wives tales.” [3]

“Alma Parens” by William Bouguereau

“Throughout German, Austrian and Swiss folktales we find this former Goddess demoted, together with Her twin Perchta, to a witch.  Frau Holle was the more pleasant of the two: sunshine streamed from Her hair when She combed it, snow covered the earth when She shook a feather comforter, and rain fell when She threw away laundry water.   She was a splendid white lady who appeared each noon to bathe in the fountain, from which children were said to be born.  She lived in a cave in the mountain or in a well, and people could visit Her by diving into it.

She rode on the wind in a wagon.  Once She had to have a broken lynchpin repaired, and the man who helped Her later found that savings of wood from the project had fumed to gold.  In addition to gold, She rewarded good people with useful gifts, such as the invention of flax and spinning.

Her feast day was celebrated on winter solstice, when She checked the quality of each spinner’s work.  A good spinner would wake to find Frau Holle had left her a single golden thread, but sloppy ones found their work tangled, their spinning wheels shattered or burnt.

The period between December 25 and January 6 – the ‘twelve days of Christmas’ – were sacred to Frau Holle during that time She traveled the world in Her wagon.  No rotary actions were allowed; sleighs were used instead of wagons, and all meal-grinding had to cease.  Her twin Perchta was, if not welcomed, at least acknowledged at the same season” (Monaghan, p. 127).

“Frigga, Goddess of Women & Wisdom” by Thorskegga

 

Correspondences
Other Names: Frau Holda, Frau Holle, Winter Goddess, White Lady, Mother Yule, Hulde
Attributes: Virtue, Motherhood, Wisdom
Season: Winter, Yule
Symbols: Spindle, Spinning Wheel, Flax, Geese, Apples, Milk, Elder Tree, Elderberry Tea
Colors: White, Ice Blue
Symbols: Snow, Snowflakes, Well      [4]

 

 

 

Sources:

Eaves, Susan “Ratatask”. Eplagarthrkindred.org, “HoldaArticle“.

Monaghan, Patricia. The New Book of Goddesses and Heroines, “Frau Holle”.

Paxson, Diana L. Hrafnar.org,”Holda“.

SummerGaile. Order of the White Moon, “The Sacred Journey and Migration of Frau Holda Into our Modern Reality“.

Zmaj, Majka. Order of the White Moon, “Holda: White Lady of Winter“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

AOR, Thorsigurd. Odinic-rite.org, “Holda“.

Finnegan, Margaret. Margaretfinnegan.blogspot.com, “Goddess of the Week: Holda“.

Fox, Selena. Beliefnet.com, “Riding with Holda“.

Dashu, Max. Suppressedhistories.net, “The Old Goddess“.

GardenStone. Goddess Holle: In Search of a Germanic Goddess.

Glaux. Afwcraft.blogspot.com, “Faces of the Golden Queen“.

Graves, Shannon. Northernpaganism.org, Who is Holda?

Motherholda.blog.com, “Holda

Linda-heathenycatmusings.blogspot.com, “H is for the goddess HOLDA – Ancient Lady of the Sacred Land, Queen of the ‘other folk’“.

Marks, Dominic. Lowchensaustralia.com, “Norse Goddess Names“.

Motz, Lotte. Winterscapes.com, “The Winter Goddess: Percht, Holda, and Related Figures“.

Theoddgods.com, “Perchta/Berchta“.

Seigfried, Karl E. H. Norsemyth.org, “THE GODS & GODDESSES, Part Two“.

Swampy. Dutchie.org, “Goddess Berchta“.

Wikipedia, “Holda“.

Goddess Themis

“Libra” by *moonmomma

“Themis’s themes are justice, equity, reason, morality, organization, foresight, karma and truth. Her symbols are balanced items and scales. In Greek tradition, Themis personifies the law in both spirit and deed. She regulates karmic order in the cosmos and presides over matters of moral judgment. Today, Themis strengthens the voice of consciousness and the gift of foresight within us, becoming a sound counsellor in difficult decisions and offering balanced perspectives.

Bearing in mind Themis’s legal theme, tend to any pressing legal matters today. If a court matter is pending, check on it. If you need to catch up on past-due parking tickets, do so. Themis will help resolve any matter of law in the most equitable manner possible.

Should you actually have to go to court today, carry an image of a scale or any balanced geometric figure in your pocket to invite Her assistance. Themis lives in just actions and orderliness, so just by treating people fairly and organizing your day, you invoke Her presence.

Throughout the day, take an extra moment to consider the repercussions of your actions, both mundanely and spiritually. Consider this a time to balance your karmic check book and make right some wrongs in your life. Also, be honest in your words and thoughts today. This honors and pleases this Goddess greatly.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Themis” by Michele-lee Phelan

The ‘steadfast one,’ the daughter of Gaia, was the earth Goddess personified as an unshakable power.  By Homer‘s time, She had come to signify a second powerful steadfastness: the social contract among people living on the earth (similarly Fides).  One of the most ancient and most hallowed of Goddesses, Themis later became a vague and abstract personality.  Yet evidence of Her original precedence is suggested: no Olympian gathering could take palace unless She called it, and neither could any divinity lift the cup of nectar before She had drunk.

In the language of Her people, themis was a common as well as a proper noun, the former indicating the power of convention, of whatever is fixed in society as steadfastly as the earth beneath us.  The personification of such social cohesion, Themis was shown bearing a pair of scales; as the fruitful earth, She was shown holding the cornucopia.  She was mother of the seasons, or Horae, Goddesses who determined the proper moment for the fruitful earth’s budding and exhaustion, and the proper times as well for human events.  One of Themis’ daughters, the fierce Dike, was Her own maiden self, a stern, uncompromising virgin.

Her other children were the Horai [Eunomia (‘lawful order’), Dike (‘justice’), and Irene (‘peace’)] and the Moirai (the spinning, allotting and cutting fate Goddesses).

Themis ruled prophesy, for She knew human nature and the nature of human society and so could predict the outcome of any struggle; thus She shared with Mother Gaia the famous Delphic Oracle.  For Her worship, She demanded group dancing, the symbol of group’s bonding through graceful action.  Eldest of Greek Goddesses, She was the first to whom temples were built, for before Her there was no human community to offer worship” (Monaghan, p. 294 – 295).

“The only consort for Themis mentioned in the sources below is Zeus.

“Justitia” by Howard David Johnson

A Roman equivalent of one aspect of Hellenic Themis, as the personification of the divine rightness of law, was Iustitia (Anglicized as Justitia). Her origins are in civic abstractions of a Roman mindset, rather than archaic mythology, so drawing comparisons is not fruitful. [Themis is] portrayed as an impassive woman, holding scales and a double-edged sword (sometimes a cornucopia), and since the 16th century usually shown blindfolded.” [1]

Themis armed with sword and balance scales (Legislative Council Building, Central, Hong Kong)

 

 

Sources:

Monaghan, Patricia. The New Book of Goddesses and Heroines, “Themis”.

Wikipedia, “Themis“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Artesia. Goddessschool.com, “Themis: Voice of the Earth“.

Donleavy, Pamela & Ann Shearer. From Myth to Modern Healing: Themis: Goddess of Heart-Soul, Justice and Reconciliation.

Gill, N.S. Ancienthistory.about.com, “Lady Justice“.

Goddess-guide.com, “Themis the Greek Goddess“.

Harrison, Jane Ellen. Themis: A Study of the Social Origins of Greek Religion.

Theoi.com, “Themis“.

Took, Thalia. The Obscure Goddess Online Directory, “The Camenae“.

Wikipedia, “Lady Justice“.

Willow Myst. Order of the White Moon, “Themis“.

Malkuth

This is my Birthday Goddess 🙂

“Sophia” by Pamela Matthews

“Malkuth’s themes are forgiveness, cleansing, health, peace, Earth and balance. Her symbols are yellow-colored items, quartz, cereals and grains and the number 10. Malkuth is the Goddess of the tenth sephira in the Cabalistic Tree of Life. Here She reminds us of the need for positive actions on the physical plane, not simply good thoughts or lofty words, to bring about change. Malkuth also counsels us to always balance our Goddess spirituality with real life and to keep peace with the earth, which She personifies.

This is the Jewish new year [Rosh Hashanah] and typically a time for prayer, introspection, and healing the emotional wounds that keep people apart. Take ten minutes out of your morning routine and pray to the Goddess or meditate on recent months. This will give you time to begin integrating all the lessons and changes that have occurred.

Jumping into or over water today liberates you from sin and negativity, as does naming a handful of grain after your problems and tossing it in water. Eating a round loaf of bread dipped in honey brings longevity, and eating apples dipped in honey brings the sweetness of Malkuth’s health.

To encourage Malkuth’s balance and harmony throughout your day, wear something yellow or carry a yellow-colored stone or a piece of quartz with you. The quartz in particular engenders better communication skills and an improved connection with the earth/physical plane.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Malkuth” by Patricia Waldygo

According to Wikipedia, “Malkuth (pronounced marl-KOOT], or Shekhinah, is the tenth of the sephirot in the Kabbalistic Tree of Life. It sits at the bottom of the Tree, below Yesod. This sephirah has as a symbol the Bride which relates to the sphere of Tipheret, symbolized by the Bridegroom.

Unlike the other nine sephirot, it is an attribute of God which does not emanate from God directly. Rather it emanates from God’s creation—when that creation reflects and evinces God’s glory from within itself.

Malkuth means Kingdom. It is associated with the realm of matter/earth and relates to the physical world, the planets and the solar system. It is important not to think of this sephirah as merely ‘unspiritual’, for even though it is the emanation furthest from the divine source, it is still on the Tree of Life. As the receiving sphere of all the other sephirot above it, Malkuth gives tangible form to the other emanations. It is like the negative node of an electrical circuit. The divine energy comes down and finds its expression in this plane, and our purpose as human beings is to bring that energy back around the circuit again and up the Tree.

Some occultists have also likened Malkuth to a cosmic filter, which lies above the world of the Qliphoth, or the Tree of Death, the world of chaos which is constructed from the imbalance of the original sephirot in the Tree of Life. For this reason it is associated with the feet and anus of the human body, the feet connecting the body to Earth, and the anus being the body’s ‘filter’ through which waste is excreted, just as Malkuth excretes unbalanced energy into the Qliphoth. Another way to understand this is that when one is sitting, as in a meditative state, it is the anus that makes physical contact with the Earth, whereas when one is standing or walking, it is the feet that come in contact with the Earth, or Malkuth.

Malkuth is also associated with the world of Assiah, the material plane, and the lowest of the Four Worlds of Kabbalah. Because of this relation to Assiah, it is also related to the Suit of Pentacles or Coins in the Tarot. In the modern card set, this relates to the Suit of Diamonds and symbolizes material wealth, or the treasures found in the physical world. Through Assiah, Malkuth is also related to the four Page cards in the Tarot as well. These are seen as the Jacks of the modern deck. Because it is directly associated with Assiah, Malkuth also represents the second He (ה) in the tetragrammaton (יהוה‎). There is also a connection to the tenth card of each suit in Tarot. The element of Malkuth is Earth.

“Malkuthael” by Harry Wendrich

The name of God is Adonai Melekh or Adon ha-Arets. These exist in the highest world, Atziluth. In the world of Briah, where the archangels reside, the archangel of this sphere is Sandalphon. In the world of Yetzirah, the Ishim (souls of fire) is the Angelic order. In Assiah, the plantary or astrological correspodence with Malkuth is the Earth. In the outer shell of its Sephiroth in Assiah, the Qliphah of Malkuth is Lilith.

“Mother of the World” by Nicholas Roerich

Symbols associated with this sphere are a Bride (a young woman on a throne with a veil over her face) and a double cubed altar. Where Binah is known as the Superior Mother, this sphere is referred to as the Inferior Mother. It is also referred to as the bride of Microprosopos, where Macroprosops is Kether.

From a Christian viewpoint this sphere is important since Jesus preached that people should ‘seek first the Kingdom of God‘.

In some systems, it is equated with Da’at, knowledge, the invisible sephirah.

In comparing with Eastern systems, Malkuth is a very similar archetypal idea to that of the Muladhara chakra. In this manner, Malkuth is again associated with the anus, although technically the Muladhara is located in the sacram bone. In Shakta tantra, which is also associated with the Earth, the plane in which karma is expressed.

Although Malkuth is seen as the lowest Sefirah on the tree of life, it also contains within it the potential to reach the highest. This is exemplified in the Hermetic maxim ‘As above so below’. [1]

“As Above, So Below” by Tania Marie

 

 

Sources:

Wikipedia, “Malkuth“.

 

Suggested Links:

Amaluxherbal.com, “The Kabbalah made Practical“.

Corax.com, “The Tree of Life“.

d’Este, Sorita. Themagicalbuffet.com, “The Goddess, Wicca & the Qabalah“.

Ghostwoods. Ghostwoods.com, “Malkuth: The Kingdom“.

Hermetic.com, “Malkuth“.

Themystica.org, “Malkuth“.

Penczak, Christopher. The Temple of High Witchcraft: Ceremonies, Spheres and the Witches’ Qabalah, “Entities of Malkuth“.

Spirit-alembic.com, “Malkuth: The Kingdom of Matter“.

Stone, Philo. Zero-point.tripod.com, “Book I: Sphere 10: MALKUTH, the Earth“.

Wisdomsdoor.com, “Malkuth – The Tree of Life“.

Zero-point.tripod.com, “The Holistic Qabala“.

Ratna Dakinis

“Ratna Dakini” by Phyllis Glanville

“The Ratna Dakinis’ themes are banishing, victory, kindness and Karma. Their symbols are the color yellow.  In Tibet, these Goddesses rule over all gestures of goodness and compassion, which naturally help improve Karma. Collectively, their name means ‘inestimable,’ showing us the true power and value in acts of kindness that are driven by a pure heart.

The The Hemis Festival includes a ritual playing which all manner of mythic creatures are poised against the Tibetan lamas, symbolizing the battle between good and evil.  Bells, censers, cymbals and drums draw in positive magic, banish evil and win the fight for Ratna Dakinis’ goodness. In keeping with this idea, string together some yellow-colored brass bells for a Ratna Dakinis house amulet. Hold these in your hand and empower them by saying,

‘Let you goodness ring, let purity sing, with each wind Ratna Dakinis’ blessing bring!’

Hang these where they will catch the wind regularly, releasing the magic.

Wear something yellow today to keep Ratna Dakinis in mind so that your actions will be gentle and filled with kindness. Do something nice for someon who’s been feeling blue lately, ‘just beause.’ Give them some yellow flowers, offer a hug, or maybe make an extra bell amulet for them too! This boosts good Karma, makes both of you feel good and invoks Ratna Dakinis’ blessings through thoughtfulness.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Golden Dakini” by A. Andrew Gonzalez

“The term Dakini is Sanskrit. It’s Tibetan equivalent is Khadrokha meaning ‘sky’ and dro meaning to ‘go’. Taking it together, Khadro means one who can move through the sky.  It’s very important we think about this literal meaning in trying to understand Dakinis. Now, all dakinis are portrayed in female form — there male counterpart being called dakas. There are enlightened dakinis and unenlightened dakinis.

The unenlightened dakinis are termed worldly dakinis because they are still caught in the cyclic world of samsara. Worldly dakinis are found in human form as well as in astral (lunar) form and could have a form of a beautiful fairy-like being or a demonic flesh-eating being. An example of a worldly dakini are the Five evil Tseringma sisters Padma Sambhava tamed (control) into protectors. Another example of a worldly dakini is a celestial messenger falling into the category of a protector bodhisattva performing beneficial actions. Another example might be a great human practitioner that has accomplished some insight but who is not yet released from suffering.

The enlightened dakinis are the Wisdom Dakinis. They have passed beyond samsara into liberation and an example of an enlightened dakini would be any one of the female yidam or one of the female consorts to the Five Dhyana Buddhas.

Art by Penny Slinger

There are five families of Worldly and Wisdom Dakinis: Vajra Dakinis, Ratna Dakinis, Padma Dakinis, Karma Dakinis, and Buddha Dakinis. And both the worldly dakinis and wisdom dakinis can have supernatural powers. You may recall the story of Tilopa where he encountered a number of various dakinis. The worldly dakinis who had control over sight and sound bombarded him with mirages after which he met the dakinis embodying the five activities and finally he met with the wisdom dakini in the heart of the mandala.

The dakinis are born in three manners: 1) Spontaneously enlightened ones arise from Sabogakaya‘s unfoldment from Dharmakaya. Example of these Dakinis being Tara and Vajrayogini. 2)Those born in heavenly realms. Those who are born from within the heavenly realms and those who reach the heavenly realms though their own attainment. 3)Finally, those born by realization of mantra. These are humans who have reached various levels of inner realization.

So, as you can see, there are many different types and levels of dakinis. Dakinis in general can be a guiding light along the path removing physical and spiritual hindrances. They can play a great part in an individual’s attainment of enlightenment. They are the forces that awaken dormant qualities of spiritual impulses hidden in the subconscious. It is the dakini’s inspirational influence that can open one and remove obstacles. But, it is the Wisdom Dakinis that we should be interested in learning about and who we can rely on to truly release us from samsara.” [1]

Ratna Dakini

“The Ratna (Precious) Dakinis represent South, grandness and compassion.” [2] The family is Ratna Family, or the jeweled family, have the following associations:

  • The color is golden yellow.
  • The element is earth.
  • The symbol is the jewell.
  • The afflicted pattern is arrogance, pride; which covered feeling of inadequacy, not being good enough, creating greed, consuming hunger, consuming of all kinds.
  • The wisdom is of fundamental reality, the reality of equality, which is the same energy when the struggle is released.  Release of all self-advancements, self-importance and over barring attitudes to a relaxed state of equanimity and generosity, like the earth.
  • The Ratna Dakini has full body, has good sense of humour, and likes bright colours. Her knife is ornamented with the jewell. In Her left hand She holds the scull cup, with nectar of knowledge brimming out of it. In the crook of her left arm is the Katvanga staff – the inner consort. She is golden. Wisdom flames of equanimity and unchanging stillness emanate from Her body.
  • The seed syllable is – “RI”      [3]

 

 

Sources:

A Buddhist Library, “The Dakini Principle“.

Bundyuk, Maryna Brij. Creative Seedlings.com, “Meditation in the Mandala of the 5 Dakinis, the Enlightened Feminine“.

Chinaroad Löwchen. Tibetan Goddess Names, “Dakinis,the“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Buddha Nature.com, “The Vajra Dakini“.

Dakini Yogini Central, “Five Wisdom Dakini“.

Labdron, Machik. Machik’s Complete Explanation: Clarifying the Meaning of Chod (Tsadra Foundation).

Shaw, Miranda. Buddhist Goddesses of India.

Shaw, Miranda. Passionate Enlightenment: Women in Trantric Buddhism.

Simmer-Brown, Judith. “Dakini’s Warm Breath: The Feminine Principle in Tibetan Buddhism“.

Vajranatha.com, “Wisdom Dakinis, Passionate and Wrathful“.

Wikipedia, “Dakini“.

Goddess Seshat

“Seshat’s themes are honor, learning, history, time and Karma. Her symbols are books and writing implements. Seshat is the Egyptian record keeper of the gods and a Goddess to whom history, writing and books are all sacred. Seshat reminds us that to change both our collective and our individual futures, we must first learn from the past. Measuring time and helping people plan out sacred buildings, Seshat often appears in art with a severn-pointed rosette and a wand (likely to inscribe Her notes).

A time to remember people who have died in battle, Memorial Day also affords us a moment to remember those who have fought for freedom in alternative faiths. For the phrase, ‘never again the burning’ to mean something, we have to open our ‘broom closets’ and begin education the public about the beauty of magical traditions instead of using the usual hype. If you know someone who’s been curious about magic, sharing your knowledge today honors Seshat and all the people who have kept records of our metaphysical legacy even when rising their lives.

Attend to your magical books today: read, write, make notes of your experiences with all due diligence and ask Seshat to help you see the bigger picture. Don’t dawdle today! Commit yourself to eliminating the phrase ‘pagan standard time’ from your vocabulary. Being timely is something this Goddess appreciates.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

 

Art by Jenny Carrington

“Seshat (Sesha, Sesheta or Safekh-Aubi) was a Goddess of reading, writing, arithmetic and architecture who was seen as either the female aspect of Thoth, his daughter or his wife. They had a child called Hornub. This actually means “gold Horus“, so Seshat was sometimes associated with Isis. She was the scribe of the pharaoh, recording all of his achievements and triumphs including recording both the booty and the captives taken in battle. She was also thought to record the actions of all people on the leaves of the sacred persea tree.

Seshat, inscribing the years of reign for the king on the palm-leaf rib which served for tallying up the years and so had become the hieroglyph for “year”.

She was known by the epithet ‘Mistress of the House of Books’ because She looked after the library of the gods and was the patron of all earthly libraries. She was also patron of all forms of writing, including accounting, auditing and the taking of census. According to one myth, it was actually Seshat who invented writing, but it was her husband Thoth who taught the people to write. It is interesting to note that She is the only female character who was actually depicted in the act of writing. A number of other women were depicted holding the scribes palette and brush, indicating that they could write, but not actually engaged in writing.

She was also given the epithet ‘Mistress of the House of Architects’ and from at least the Second Dynasty She was associated with a ritual known as ‘pedj shes’ (‘stretching the cord’) which was conducted during the laying of the foundations of stone buildings. The ‘cord’ refers to the mason´s line which was used to measure out the dimensions of the building. She was occasionally associated with Nephthys. For example, in the Pyramid Texts She is given the epithet ‘The Lady of the House’ (nbt-hwt, ie Nephthys) while Nephthys is described as ‘Seshat, Foremost of Builders’.

So far, no temple specifically dedicated to Her has been located and there is no documentary evidence that one ever existed. However, She was depicted on a number of other temples and we know that She did have Her own priests because Prince Wep-em-nefret (Dynasty Four) was described as ‘Overseer of the Royal Scribes’ and ‘Priest of Seshat’. However, it seems that as Thoth grew in importance he absorbed Her roles and Her priesthood.

She was depicted as a woman wearing a leopard skin dress (as worn by Sem preiests) wearing a headdress composed of a flower or seven pointed star on top of a pair of inverted horns. She was ocassional called ‘Safekh-Aubi’ (or ‘Safekh-Abwy’ meaning ‘She of two horns’) because of this headdress, although it is also suggested that ‘Safekh-Aubi’ was in fact a seperate (if rather obscure) Goddess. However, others have suggested that the horns were originally a crescent moon, representing Her husband (or alter ego) Thoth. Finally, it is sometimes suggested that the ‘horns’ actually represent a bow. Unfortunately there is no clear evidence to confirm which view is correct. Her headdress also represents Her name which was not spelled phonetically (the semi-circular breadloaf and the seated woman are both female determinatives). She is often shown offering palm branches (representing ‘many years’)to the pharaoh to give him a long reign.” [1]

 

 

 

Sources:

Hill, J. Ancient Egypt Online, “Seshat“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Aleff, H. Peter. Recoveredscience.com, “Seshat and Her Tools“.

Goddess-Guide.com, “Seshat The Egyptian Goddess“.

Isis-Seshat Journal, “Who Is Seshat?

Seawright, Caroline. Tour Egypt, “Seshat, Female Scribe, Goddess of Writing Measurement“.

Wikipedia, “Seshat“.

Goddess Tou Mou

“Tou Mou’s themes are cleansing, luck, charity, Karma and history.  Her symbols are pens (or quills), books and light.  The Chinese/Thai Goddess of record keeping takes special notice of our actions (or inactions) today, keeping careful notes for the Karmic bank account. In works of art, Tou Mou is depicted sitting behind books and glowing with the beautiful light of the aurora. It is this brightness that shines on our lives today, revealing both the good and the bad. Suitable offerings for this Goddess include rice, fruit, and all acts of goodness.

In Thailand, Songkran begins with tossing water down the street to chase away evil influences. I suggest using your driveway instead, or a glass of water on the kitchen floor that is judiciously mopped up later.

People in Thailand traditionally wash their parents’ hands with scented water today to bring them honor and long life. So, remember your elders today, and do something nice for them – it’s good Karma, and it definitely catches Tou Mou’s attention. Another activity extends good deeds to the natural world – that of freeing songbirds, who then bear their liberator’s prayers directly to Tou Mou’s ear. You might want to simply scatter some birdseed for similar results.

Finally, it might be a good day to balance your check book to make sure your financial Karma stays in good standing. Burn a green candle nearby for prosperity.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

Tou Muthe Chinese mother and sky Goddess, is an important deity in the Taoist hierarchy.  She is the Chinese Goddess of the North Star, and keeper of the book of life and death, controlling the days of humans and  supervises a register in which the life and death of each person on earth is recorded.  She is said to have the ability to save people who call on Her from many evils and troubles.  She is a Goddess who controls not only the natural process of heaven and earth, but also helps to maintain the Universe in equilibrium.

Tou Mu, Goddess of the North Star, 1922. From Myths and Legends of China, by Edward TC Werner.

Having attained all of the celestial mysteries, Tou Mu alone is able to cross between the moon and the sun. She is the mother of the Nine Celestial Kings. She is portrayed sitting on a lotus blossom, and She has four heads (each facing one of the four cardinal directions) and eight arms. In Her hands She holds such things as 2 Circles which represent the Sun and the Moon (which cannot be omitted or replaced); a bell which represents the power to summon/control all the elements; a seal which represents authority; bow and arrow, curved spear, sword, etc. which is to eliminate negative entities/force; a flag, and/or a flower. Tou Mu’s name means “Mother of the Great Wagon”, and is also seen as Tou Mou, Dou Mu, and Dou Mou.  Her official title is Sheng De Zi Guang Tian Hou Da Sheng Yuan Ming Dou Mu Yuan Jun.  [1] [2] [3]

On his site, Vabien explains Her coming into being “in simple terms, She was an energy that was created after the manifestation of San Qing (The Pure Ones) and way before the formation of the Universe. Only after the collision of energies of Dou Mu (extreme negative) and Dou Fu (extreme positive), the universe was formed and this is when the star lords are being manifested from the collision. This is why, She is the mother of all star lords.

Many people even me, at the beginning mistaken Her as Guan Yin or Chun Ti as the features are very similar such as sitting on a lotus, two hands grasp the Sun and the Moon and even the weapons held are also the same or similar to that. So how do we know if we are honoring Dou Mu or deities of other religion.

  1. Dou Mu have four faces. (Note: No more than 4 faces)
  2. 8 Arms holding onto different object. (Note: Usually 18 arms would be Chun Ti)
  3. Hand symbol aka mudra. (The hand symbol is put in front of Her chest but this feature is quite hard to see as a slight difference in the hand symbol mean it will be another deity and sometimes it is can’t been seen clearly.)
  4. Usually She would be depicted holding a bell and a seal but this varies, as She holds a range of different items.” [3]
“She is rather like a Kwan Yin, being a compassionate Goddess and  is venerated by those who wish a long life and personal compassion.  In Taoist temples a hall is often dedicated to Her. She is also venerated by Chinese Buddhists.” [4]

Sources:

MXTODIS123. An Inner Journey: The Moon, Mythology, and You, “Doumu“.

Sabrina. Goddess A Day, “Tou Mu“.

Vabien. Vabien’s Deities Site, “The Mother of Taoism – Dou Mu Yuan Jun“.

Suggested Links:

Werner, E.T.C. Myths & Legends of China, “Goddeses of the North Star“.

Her Cyclopedia, “The Goddess Tou-Mu, Mother-of-the-Pole-Star“.

Taoist Resources,Constellation Mother“.

Taoistsecret.com, “Goddess of the Northern Star“.

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