Tag Archive: kachina


Goddess Yellow Woman

Corn Maiden by kelpie2004

“Yellow Woman’s themes are nature, providence and animals. Her symbols are yellow items, green items and embroidered items. This Pueblo Goddess of magic, agriculture and the hunt is also the heroine of many local stories, having taught humans important sacred ceremonies. Today She helps us remember these rituals and reintegrate the into our lives. Art depicts Yellow Woman wearing an embroidered blanket-dress, a green mask (revealing Her connection to nature), and a white mantle. Sometimes She appears as a Corn Goddess and other times as a witch, bear, or ogress.

This is a time of the Buffalo Dance, which honors nature and mimes, and ancient hunting ritual thought to ensure a successful hunt. This dance is a type of sympathetic magic that also appeases the souls of the animals about to be captured.  For our purposes, this equates to a kind of ritual mime in which we enact our hopes as realized, asking Yellow Woman to guide our movements so they will manifest in magic.  For example, to improve self-love, give yourself a hug so you receive that energy. For relationships, open your arms wide so they await the right person (figuratively receiving a ‘good catch’, which is in Yellow Woman’s dominion too!)

To improve awareness of the significance of ritual, eat corn today or wear yellow, white, and/or green clothing. Embroidered items also please this Goddess.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

Hopi Hemis Kachin Mana Kachina

From The Goddess Oracle by Amy Sophia Marashinsky: “Southwestern indigenous aboriginals and pueblo peoples – the Arikara, Pawnee, Cheyenne, Mandan, Hidasta, Abnaki, Cherokee and Huron – see corn as a Goddess. Corn Woman encompasses the figures of Corn Mother, the Corn Maidens, and Yellow Woman. They all relate to corn as a sacred being who gives of Herself to Her people to sustain them and nourish them. The Arikara Creator God, Nesaru, fashioned Corn Mother from an ear of corn which grew in heaven.  Corn Mother then came to earth and taught people how to honor the deities and to plant corn.” [1]

“Corn Woman or Maiden who is a figure in many stories. She may appear as a kachina mana, that is, a female kachina. At Cochiti, for example, Yellow Woman kachina wears a green mask and has Her hair done in butterfly whorls on the sides of Her head. She wears an embroidered ceremonial blanket as a dress and an all-white manta over Her shoulders. Yellow Woman tends to be a stock heroine in many stories, taking on a wide range of identities, including bride, witch, chiefs daughter, bear woman, and ogress.” [2]

 

 

 

Sources:

Americanindianoriginals.com, “Kachina Dolls: Their Meaning and Tribal Development – Corn Maiden Kachina Doll“.

Marashinsky, Amy Sophia. The Goddess Oracle, “Corn Woman“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Jukiewicz, Carol E. Groups.yahoo.com/group/indigenous_peoples_literature, “[indigenous_peoples_literature] Yellow Woman stories“.

Kachina-doll-shop.com, “Kachina Names & Meanings“.

Nagoda-Bergquist, Susi. Coyoteandanotherone.com, “Yellow Woman, The Moon“.

Redaspen.blogspot.com, “Evil Kachina and Yellow Corn Woman“.

Silko, Leslie Marmon. Yellow Woman.

Yellow Woman Stories [PDF from boblyman.net]

Yellow-Woman—talking-points [Female Archetypes and “Yellow Woman” DOC from TeacherWeb]

Nuvak’chin Mana

Snow Maiden Kachina by Wilmer Kaye

Nuvak’chin Mana’s themes are ghosts (spirits), blessings, weather and winter. Her symbols are cold items, white, and moisture.  This Goddess’s name means ‘Snow Maiden’. In the Niman Festival, Nuvak’chin Mana is a kachina who appears to pray for the return of cold weather so the moisture in the earth gets replenished. In our lives, She comes to replenish the well of our spirits and cool any overheated tempers that erupt with summer’s heat.

In Hopi tradition, Kachinas are spirits that help the tribe in all matters of life. Each year the Kachinas emerge around February to remind people of their blessings and to teach the sacred rituals that bring rain. Around this time of year, the Kachinas return to their rest, escorted out of the human realms by the Niman ritual.

To bring Nuvak’chin Mana’s coolheadedness and refreshing energy to your entire day, drink a glass of milk on the rocks at breakfast, lunch and dinner (or anytime in between). It’s very refreshing and the appearance of the beverage honors the Goddess. If your region has been suffering from a dry spell, pour out a little of the milk and ice on the ground as an offering to Nuvak’chin Mana so She might carry your need for rain to the nature spirits.

Last, take a moment at some point during the day to thank the Powers for all your blessings. A grateful heart is one ready to give and recieve more of the Goddess!”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Kachin’ Mana” by Sally Hall

According to Heather Marseillan: “Shortly after Summer Solstice each year the Hopi ceremony called the Niman Kachina, also known as ‘The Going Home of the Kachina’ or ‘The Niman Festival’ will begin. Typically this Native American festival starts 4-5 days after the solstice and runs for about sixteen days. It is a very important time for the Hopi and they still celebrate it today.  The Niman Kachina is more or less a drawn out good bye ceremony to the winter and spring Kachinas.

The Kachia are a spirits in the western Pueblo cosmology and religious practices of the Native American Tribes of the region. Western Pueblo, Native American cultures which are located in the southwestern region of the United States, include the Hopi, Zuni, Tewa Village, Acoma Pueblo, and the Laguna Pueblo. The Kachina has spread to the more eastern Pueblos as well.

“Magnificent Seven” by Sally Hall

A Kachina can represent anything that exists in the natural world or the cosmos including an ancestor to an element (earth, air, fire, water or spirit), a place, a quality that one can have, a natural phenomenon (drought, flood, tonado), or even an idea. There are over than 400 different Kachinas in Hopi and Pueblo cultures. The local pantheon of Kachinas will vary depending on the pueblo community. There may be Kachinas for the sun, stars, thunder storms, wind, plants, bugs, and many other such things. Kachinas are thought of as having human like relationships with each other.” [1]

Nuvak’chin Mana or Snow Maiden

“Nuvak’ Chin Mana Kachina is essentially the Snow Kachina. She is part of the Niman ceremony…which closes the Kachina season after the summer solstice. She is meant to be white. Her snow white hair is done up in small knots on either side of Her head and in ceremony She has painted black eyes and small dots above the eyes. On either side of Her cheeks She carries black warrior marks…In ceremony, She brings gifts to the audience and gives prayer for snow for the coming year.  [Shown left] She kneels, ready to begin playing the gourd rasp, as She normally would during the Niman Ceremony.” [2]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

Marseillan, Heather. Examiner.com, “Niman Kachina Festival“.

Teyjah. Art in Petroglyphs by Teyjah, “Nuvak’ Chin Mana Kachina“.

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