Tag Archive: iyatiku


Goddess Selu

“Selu’s themes are the harvest, the weather and growth. Her symbol is corn.  This Southeastern Native American corn Goddess planted Her very heart so people wouldn’t go hungry. Corn sprouted from it. To this day, Her spirit teaches us how to refertilize the earth to bring us the sustenance we need.

In this primary festival (the Fiesta de Santa Clara) among the Pueblo Native Americans, Santa Clara replaced Selu, the spirit of the corn, when Christianity took hold. For the Pueblo, corn is a staple, so as the sun reigns in power they dance for rain and evoke the Corn Spirit for every portion of the crop’s growth. Following this tradition, if it’s raining today, go outside and rejoice in Selu’s growth-related energy. Dance with a bit of cron (or eat some beforehand) to invoke her powers for progress in any area of your life.

If your region has needed rain lately, try drumming for it while scattering corn kernels mingled with pine needles on the ground. The corn and needles act as a gift to the Godedss and the sound they make is a kind of sympathetic magic to draw the rain.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Corn Dawn Mother” by Marti Fenton

“Selu is the Cherokee (Tsalagi language) name for the Corn Mother who is worshiped by nearly all Native American tribes. She is called by many names but almost all literally translate to ‘Corn Mother’ ‘Corn Maiden’ or ‘Corn Woman’ (see my July 2 entry on “Corn Mother“). Often the name the Corn Mother Goddess is known by is used as the common word for ‘corn’ as well. Selu is the Goddess of the Harvest of course, but also wisdom, magic, hunting (as the wife of Kanati the God of the Hunt,) and various other domains. She was often the most honored ‘Mother’ Goddess among many tribes including the Cherokee.

The Aztec called her Chicomecoatl and She was their the Goddess of Corn and of all Fertility (of crops, livestock, wild animals, and people’s own fertility.)During one month the Goddess of ‘maize’ (Corn) was the patron deity in the religious celebrations. The main corn blessing rite was led by many Priestesses each carrying seven ears of corn wrapped in fancy cloth on their backs, wearing fancy make-up and feather decorated dresses. At the setting of the sun the Priestesses threw colored corn into the crowds, symbolizing the Corn Goddess Chicomecoatl’s blessing the tribe with fertility for the coming harvest season.

The Hopi called Her ‘Qocha Mana.’ That tribe also has one of the most beautiful Corn Woman tales. They say that it took place long long ago. The men of the village had went out on a hunt. It was mid-winter and there was only a little food in left the village. The women and children stayed behind to wait their return. The men were due to return in three sunsets time but got lost in the snow storm. The menfolk were gone for 20 sunsets instead and when they returned home, all the children ran out to greet them. The men were happy to see the children but were perplexed that their wives and sweethearts were not coming out to greet them. As they entered the village, they found all of the women dead. They rationed the food out to only the children thus sacrificed themselves so that their children could live on. The village shaman told the men ‘We must dance the Dance of Thanksgiving, for the bounty we have returned with’. The men protested, ‘How can we have a Thanksgiving Dance with all of our women dead?’ The Shaman simply said, ‘Trust in the Gods.’

“Corn Dawn Maiden” by Marti Fenton (White Deer Song)

As the men prepared for the Thanksgiving Dance that night the Creator came to the Shaman. She told him to do something unbelievable. She told him to bury all of the women. Furthermore, She directed for the women to be buried together in a single shallow grave. The next morning all of the woman were buried as directed by the Mother Goddess. That night, the men and the children danced the Thanksgiving Dance with heavy hearts. The Creator caused a great sleep to come over the village and sent a wonderful God to the village. The God was tall handsome and entertaining comical fellow who played a flute. He went to the grave and started to play his flute. He bent over the grave and as he played, tears feel from his eyes. These tears became seeds of corn as he played and cried. At the end of 20 sunsets our Creator said to him, ‘Kokopelli, you shall forever remain hunched over as a tribute to the maidens who will forever be known as the Corn Women. Your tears of sympathy have become seeds of lifegiving corn.

Thus, it is told that the Hopi shall never go hungry again for Kokopelli and the Corn Women have given the tribe life through the sacred corn.” [1]

 

 

 

Sources:

Cyber Temples of the Gods, “Selu’s (the Corn Mother’s) Temple“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Britannica Online Encyclopedia, “Corn Mother“.

Cornmother.com, “The Corn Mother“.

First People – the Legends, “Corn Mother – Penobscot“.

Goddessrealm.com, “Corn Mother Goddess of Nourishment“.

Goddesses and Gods, “Goddess Corn Mother“.

Hrana Janto, Illustration & Illumination, “Corn Maiden“.

Native-languages.org, “Legendary Native American Figures: Selu“.

Raine, Lauren. Threads of the Spiderwoman, “Corn Mother and Collaboration“.

Return of the Corn Mothers

Sidhe, Fiana. Matrifocus, “Goddess in the Wheel of the Year – The Corn Mother“.

Tanith. Order of the White Moon, “Corn Woman, Goddess of Nourishment“.

Two Worlds, Waynonaha. Weed Wanderings, “Wise Woman Wisdom…Corn Woman“.

 

Corn Mother

“Corn Mother” by Marjett Schille

“Corn Mother’s themes are abundance, children, energy, fertility, harvest, health, grounding, providence and strength. Her symbols are corn and corn sheafs.  Literally the spirit of the corn in Native American traditions, Corn Mother brings with her the bounty of earth, its healing capabilities, its nurturing nature and its providence. This is the season when Corn Mother really shines, bountiful with the harvest. She is happy to share of this bounty and give all those who seek Her an appreciation of self, a healthy does of practicality and a measure of good common sense.

Around this time of year, the Seminole Native Americans (in the Florida area) dance the green corn dance to welcome the crop and ensure ongoing fertility in the fields and tribe. This also marks the beginning of the Seminole year. So, if you enjoy dancing, grab a partner and dance! Or, perhaps do some dance aerobics. As you do, breathe deeply and release your stress into Corn Mother’s keeping. She will turn it into something positive, just as the land takes waste and makes it into beauty.

Using corn in rituals and spells is perfectly fitting fort this occasion. Scatter cornmeal around the sacred space to mark your magic circle or scatter it to the wind so Corn Mother can bring fertility back to you. Keeping a dried ear of corn in the house invokes Corn Mother’s protection and luck and consuming corn internalizes her blessings.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Corn Mother, also called Corn Maiden ,  mythological figure believed, among indigenous agricultural tribes in North America, to be responsible for the origin of corn (maize). The story of the Corn Mother is related in two main versions with many variations.

In the first version (the ‘immolation version’), the Corn Mother is depicted as an old woman who succors a hungry tribe, frequently adopting an orphan as a foster child. She secretly produces grains of corn by rubbing Her body. When Her secret is discovered, the people, disgusted by Her means of producing the food, accuse Her of witchcraft. Before being killed—by some accounts with Her consent—She gives careful instructions on how to treat Her corpse. Corn sprouts from the places over which Her body is dragged or, by other accounts, from Her corpse or burial site.

“Corn Maiden” by Marti Fenton (White Deer Song)

In the second version (the ‘flight version’), She is depicted as a young, beautiful woman who marries a man whose tribe is suffering from hunger. She secretly produces corn, also, in this version, by means that are considered to be disgusting; She is discovered and insulted by Her in-laws. Fleeing the tribe, She returns to Her divine home; Her husband follows Her, and She gives him seed corn and detailed instructions for its cultivation.

Similar Native American traditions of the immolation of a maternal figure or the insult to and flight of a beautiful maiden are told to account for the origin of the buffalo, peyote, certain medicinal herbs, and the sacred pipe.” [1]

“Lammas” by Wendy Andrew

“Corn Mother is also known as Corn Woman, Corn Maiden and Yellow Woman. A variety of versions of this Goddess show up in a variety of cultures around the World, including Europe, Egypt, India and the America’s. Some of the more well known Goddesses are said to be Corn Mother’s, including the Celtic Cerridwen, the Egyptian Isis and the Greek Demeter.

The Corn Mother is the nourishment aspect of the Goddess and is most commonly associated with grain harvest. She is the Mother Goddess who nurtures those around Her with food and is the conceptual representation of ‘what we will reap we will sow’.” [2]

Sources:

Britannica Online Encyclopedia, “Corn Mother“.

Goddessrealm.com, “Corn Mother Goddess of Nourishment“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Cornmother.com, “The Corn Mother“.

First People – the Legends, “Corn Mother – Penobscot“.

Goddesses and Gods, “Goddess Corn Mother“.

Hrana Janto, Illustration & Illumination, “Corn Maiden“.

Return of the Corn Mothers

Sidhe, Fiana. Matrifocus, “Goddess in the Wheel of the Year – The Corn Mother“.

Tanith. Order of the White Moon, “Corn Woman, Goddess of Nourishment“.

Two Worlds, Waynonaha. Weed Wanderings, “Wise Woman Wisdom…Corn Woman“.

Goddess Iyatiku

"Corn Dawn Mother" by Marti Fenton

“Iyatiku’s themes are Earth, the harvest, providence, health and weather.  Her symbols are corn, beans, seeds and soil. Iyatiku is the Pueblo corn and underworld Goddess who protects not only future crops but the future in general by safeguarding children. During the early months of the year, Iyatiku extends arms of compassion to embrace us with nurturing support, just as the earth nurtures seeds.

If you have a garden, today is an excellent time to dance on the land and invoke Iyatiku’s blessings on your crops or flowers. The Pueblo and Hopi Indians have spirit dancers waltz around the land to instill the crops with energy through sacred movements.

The Hopi also plant beans on top of underground ritual rooms called kivas, which house Iyatiku’s nurturing energy. When children go into kivas for rites of passage, they emerge as adults thanks to the Goddess’s care and guidance within.

Using this symbolism to foster maturity or any other of Iyatiku’s attributes today, go today to some place close to the earth, taking a bean with you. Plant the bean, then sit on top of the ground covered with a blanket (a mock cave/ womb/ kiva). Meditate here, focusing on the bean, the rich earth below you and the earth’s generative energy. Allow Iyatiku to meet you in this sacred space and begin manifesting what you most need.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

Iyatiku is the corn Goddess of the Keresan Puebloes. From shipap, Her underground realm, mankind first ermerged, from there infants today are born and tither go the dead. To provide food for them, She plants bits of her heart in fields to the north, west, south, and east. Later the pieces of Iyatiku’s heart grow into fields of corn. The Cochiti Puebloes regard Mesewi as the hero who had led the ancestors of the tribe out of shipap. [1]

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