Tag Archive: insight


Goddess Skaði

“The Winter Queen” by ~Jolien-Rosanne

“Skaði’s themes are protection, banishing, communications, insight and winter. Her symbols are white crystals or clothing. In Northern tradition, Skaði is the spirit of the north wind, who is blowing powerfully over the Earth now. She is the Goddess of winter and wears white fur, crystal armor, and a bow and arrow for hunting. Hers is the power of communication – of announcing new insights and perceptions as they awaken within.

In the festival of Blowing of the Midwinter Horn, which dates back two thousand years, farmers around the country take out Birchwood horns today and blow them to scare away evil influences and announce Skaði’s presence.

To encourage Her communicative powers in your own life, stand outside and breathe deeply a cool, northerly wind today, letting the air empower your speech. Or carry a pumice stone wrapped in white cloth with you throughout the day (if you can’t find one, cut out a white paper snowflake instead and write Skaði’s name on it). This keeps the Goddess with you in all your discourse.
At home, find a horn (perhaps a kazoo or noise maker). Follow the Dutch custom of blowing this once in all four cardinal directions to send protection throughout your living space. Afterward, put your four white decorations (candles, stones) close to the directional points. This welcomes Skaði’s insight and open discussions therein.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Winter Goddess of the North” by ~IndigoDesigns

Patricia Monaghan tells us that Skaði (pronounced “SKAHD-ee”) was “the Goddess for whom Scandinavia was named [who] dwelled high in the snow-covered mountains; Her favorite occupations were skiing and snowshoeing through Her domain.  But when the gods caused the death of Her father, Thjassi, Skaði armed Herself and traveled to their home at Asgard, intent on vengeance.  Even alone, She was more than a match for the gods, and they were forced to make peace with Her.

Skaði demanded two things: that they make Her laugh and that She be allowed to choose a mate from among them.  The first condition was accomplished by the trickster Loki, who tied his testicles to the beard of a billy goat.  It was a contest of screeching, until the rope snapped and Loki landed, screaming in pain, on Skaði’s knee.  She laughed.

Next, all the gods lined up, and Skaði’s eyes were masked.  She intended to select Her mate simply by examine his legs from the knees down.  When She’d found the strongest – thinking them to be the beautiful Balder’s legs  – She flung off Her mask and found She’d picked the sea god Njörðr.  So She went off to live in the god’s ocean home.

“Skadi” by ~Tygerson

She was miserable there.  ‘I couldn’t sleep a wink,’ Skaði said in a famous eddic poem, ‘on the bed of the sea, for the calling of gulls and mews.’  The couple moved to Thrymheim, Skaði’s mountain palace, but the water god was as unhappy there as Skaði had been in the water.  Thereupon they agreed on an equitable dissolution, and Skaði took a new mate, more suitable to Her lifestyle: Ullr, the god of skis” (Monaghan, p. 283); though Galina Krasskova states that there’s nothing to support Skaði and Ullr coming together as a Divine couple in lore (p. 87).

“Her name is either identical with the Old Norse common noun skaði, ‘harm,’ or comes from another Germanic root preserved in the Gothic word skadus and the Old English sceadu, both of which mean ‘shadow.’” [1]  She is associated with the rune Isa.

Isa – Ice, cold, freezing. Lack of change. Stagnation. Lack of emotion. Storing binding. Bridge across danger.

Skaði is my favorite winter Goddess to work with.  Last year, I put this video together as an offering in Her honor.  It is set to the song “Wake Skadi” by Hagalaz Runedance (I LOVE the drumming!)  Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

Krasskova, Galina. Exploring the Northern Tradition, “Skaði (Sceadu)” (p. 86 -87).

Monaghan, Patricia. The New Book of Goddesses and Heroines, “Skadi”.

Runevisionreadingbycassandraisa.blogspot.com, “Isa – The Goddess Skadi“.

Turville-Petre. Myth and Religion of the North: the Religion of Ancient Scandinavia.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Agaliha. Mysticwicks.com, “Skadi {Goddess of the Week}“.

Andrews, Tamra. Dictionary of Nature Myths, “Njord“.

Baird, Anne. Paganpages.org, “Skadi, Goddess of Winter“.

Frostdottir, Isa. The Huntress Within: Finding Skadi.

Goddesscards.com, “Skadi – The Goddess of Winter“.

Kaldera, Raven. Northernpaganism.org, “Snow Queen: A Song for Skadi“.

Kaldera, Raven. Northernpaganism.org, “Who is Ullr?

Lindow, John. Norse Mythology: A Guide to Gods, Heroes, Rituals, and Beliefs.

People.tribe.net, “Skadi – Goddess of Winter“.

Sidhe, Fiana. Matrifocus.com, “Goddess in the Wheel of the Year“.

Skye, Michelle. Goddess Afoot!: Practicing Magic With Celtic and Norse Goddesses.

Swampy. Dutchie.org, “Goddess Skadi“.

Wikipedia, “Skaði“.

Goddess Sri

“Sri’s themes are joy, protection, fertility, insight, and wealth.  Her symbols are the color blue and pink lotuses. In Nepal, Sri, which means ‘prosperity’, is said to protect the Dalai Lama. Invoke Her to bring abundance for tax paying! Sri is portrayed as having three eyes, giving Her the additional power of perspective when ours is lacking.

Celebration of the Nepalese new year, Nava Varsha, includes heartfelt greetings for luck and ritual bathing for fertility. As you see people today, smile brightly and wish them a good day. This provokes Sri’s fortunate energy and a little extra felicity wherever you go.

Wearing something blue today makes Sri happy, which in turn sharpens Sri’s shrewdness in you to promote a safe, frugal day. Or, carry a tumbled soldalite for Sri’s focus, a blue topaz for Her help in maintaining financial reserves, or a turquoise so that Sri will preserve your well-being.

Try this visualisation when you need Sri’s attributes to begin blossoming in your spirit: Envision an unopened pink flower in the region of your heart. Above, the sun shines with the pink-blue light of dawn and beats with the rhythm of your blood. You feel your heart’s petals open to embrace it, accepting the warmth and energy without reservation. As your soul-flower absorbs the light, you can see it is a lotus, Sri’s flower. She is there with you now, in your hearth, to call on as needed.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Goddess Shri Devi, or Sridevi, is one of the numerous forms of Goddess Lakshmi and is the prime Goddess among the various Vishnava Goddesses, to include Bhūmi, or Bhu Devi, and Nila Devi who are also said to be different manifestations of Lakshmi worshipped in Hindu religion. Legend has it that Goddess Laxmi appeared in the form of Sridevi during the Samudra manthan or the ‘churning of the ocean’. This is mentioned in the Vishnu Purana. Goddess Shri Devi was one among the precious items that appeared during the churning of the ocean.

Hindu holy scriptures mention that in the form of Sridevi, Goddess Lakshmi has the face like that of full moon with red lips. She has a benign and smiling face. In this form, She is dressed in white color sari and wears jewelry. The young age of Goddess Lakshmi is depicted in the Sridevi form.

Goddess Sridevi is usually visualized as having two hands and sitting in Padmasana. In some scriptures She is mentioned as having four hands and She carries a pasha (noose), ankush (shining hook), rosary and lotus.” [1]

She is the beloved inseparable consort of Vishnu, his ‘Shakti‘ or power, enjoying the same status of Vishnu.  “When Sri Devi (Lakshmi) and Vishnu are depicted together they are known as Lakshmi-Narayana. In many instances, as seen below, Devi Lakshmi manifests as two separate Goddesses, Shri Devi and Bhu Devi, who appear on either side of Lord Vishnu. While the former denotes energy, the latter represents fertility.

Both the Goddesses are depicted similarly, wearing exactly the same clothes, ornaments and even a similar crown, signifying that the Lord holds equal affection for both. Their red saris and green blouses have wide gold borders, much like the beautiful zari saris made in South India. The South Indian influence is also evident in the high tower-like crown of Lord Vishnu, while that of the two ladies definitely betrays a Mughal influence.” [2]

“While Sri Devi as previously mentioned enjoys the same status as Vishnu, She is however held in higher esteem by the Vaishnava acharyas.  This is due to the fact that She possesses certain motherly qualities such as compassion (daya) and forgiveness (ksama) on account of which She has a tendency to overlook the offenses of the devotees.  She also has a tender affection (vatsalya) towards all beings like a mother towards a child, by not taking notice of their offenses.  Above all, She has natural inclination to shower grace (anugraha) upon all.” [3]

 

There were some really beautiful videos on Youtube dedicated to Lakshmi and I ended up choosing this one to share with you all.

 

 

 

 

Sources:

Exotic India, “Lord Vishnu with Manifested Energy and Fertility“.

IndiaNetzone, “Goddess Sri, Vaishnava Goddess“.

IndiaNetzone, “Vaishnava Goddesses“.

Rajendran, Abhilash. Hindu Blog, “Goddess Shri Devi – About Hindu Goddess Sridevi“.

 

Suggested Links:

Devotional Only, “VaraLakshmi Vratam – Pooja Procedure and Story“.

Exotic India, “Lakshmi: The Lotus Goddess“.

Sai MahaLakshmi.com, “Goddess Lakshmi Maha Lakshmi“.

SaiSathyaSai.com, “Mother Lakshmi Devi – Goddess of Wealth“.

Sri Venkateswara Temple, “About Temple – Sridevi (Lakshmi) and Bhudevi (Andal)“.

Wikipedia, “Sri sukta“.

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