Tag Archive: green items


Goddess Yellow Woman

Corn Maiden by kelpie2004

“Yellow Woman’s themes are nature, providence and animals. Her symbols are yellow items, green items and embroidered items. This Pueblo Goddess of magic, agriculture and the hunt is also the heroine of many local stories, having taught humans important sacred ceremonies. Today She helps us remember these rituals and reintegrate the into our lives. Art depicts Yellow Woman wearing an embroidered blanket-dress, a green mask (revealing Her connection to nature), and a white mantle. Sometimes She appears as a Corn Goddess and other times as a witch, bear, or ogress.

This is a time of the Buffalo Dance, which honors nature and mimes, and ancient hunting ritual thought to ensure a successful hunt. This dance is a type of sympathetic magic that also appeases the souls of the animals about to be captured.  For our purposes, this equates to a kind of ritual mime in which we enact our hopes as realized, asking Yellow Woman to guide our movements so they will manifest in magic.  For example, to improve self-love, give yourself a hug so you receive that energy. For relationships, open your arms wide so they await the right person (figuratively receiving a ‘good catch’, which is in Yellow Woman’s dominion too!)

To improve awareness of the significance of ritual, eat corn today or wear yellow, white, and/or green clothing. Embroidered items also please this Goddess.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

Hopi Hemis Kachin Mana Kachina

From The Goddess Oracle by Amy Sophia Marashinsky: “Southwestern indigenous aboriginals and pueblo peoples – the Arikara, Pawnee, Cheyenne, Mandan, Hidasta, Abnaki, Cherokee and Huron – see corn as a Goddess. Corn Woman encompasses the figures of Corn Mother, the Corn Maidens, and Yellow Woman. They all relate to corn as a sacred being who gives of Herself to Her people to sustain them and nourish them. The Arikara Creator God, Nesaru, fashioned Corn Mother from an ear of corn which grew in heaven.  Corn Mother then came to earth and taught people how to honor the deities and to plant corn.” [1]

“Corn Woman or Maiden who is a figure in many stories. She may appear as a kachina mana, that is, a female kachina. At Cochiti, for example, Yellow Woman kachina wears a green mask and has Her hair done in butterfly whorls on the sides of Her head. She wears an embroidered ceremonial blanket as a dress and an all-white manta over Her shoulders. Yellow Woman tends to be a stock heroine in many stories, taking on a wide range of identities, including bride, witch, chiefs daughter, bear woman, and ogress.” [2]

 

 

 

Sources:

Americanindianoriginals.com, “Kachina Dolls: Their Meaning and Tribal Development – Corn Maiden Kachina Doll“.

Marashinsky, Amy Sophia. The Goddess Oracle, “Corn Woman“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Jukiewicz, Carol E. Groups.yahoo.com/group/indigenous_peoples_literature, “[indigenous_peoples_literature] Yellow Woman stories“.

Kachina-doll-shop.com, “Kachina Names & Meanings“.

Nagoda-Bergquist, Susi. Coyoteandanotherone.com, “Yellow Woman, The Moon“.

Redaspen.blogspot.com, “Evil Kachina and Yellow Corn Woman“.

Silko, Leslie Marmon. Yellow Woman.

Yellow Woman Stories [PDF from boblyman.net]

Yellow-Woman—talking-points [Female Archetypes and “Yellow Woman” DOC from TeacherWeb]

Goddess Xmucane

“Xmucane – Her themes are time, cycles, creativity and divination. Her symbols are calendars, blue-green items and light.  This Mayan Goddess of time created time’s calculation and the calendar along with Her partner Xpiyacoc. She continues watching over all calendar functions and acts as a prophetess because she can see both past and future consecutively. Her folkloric titles include Day’s Grandmother and Maker of the Blue-Green Bowl (likely the sky).

Mayans believe the universe began on this date in 3114 B.C.E. They also teach that time will end on December 23, 2012. Exactly what this means in terms of human evolution is left to the imagination. In either case, today is a time for fresh beginnings. Call upon Xmucane to bless your appointment book and help you make the most productive possible use of your time. Try this mini-ritual:

Light a blue-green candle secured in a bowl and place it behind our calendar. Hold your hands palms-down over the datebook and say,

‘Lady of time, see where I stand in your stream.
Grant me the perspective with which to move forward confidently,
using each day on this earth to grow and learn the ways of the Goddess.
Inspire my efforts to transform every moment of my life with positive magic.
Today, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, let my moments be filled with you.
So be it.’

Blow out the candle and keep it for other rites.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

Xmucan (pronounced SHMO-cane) was “the Maya Goddess of childbirth. She was the consort of Xpiyacoc (god of marriage), and the mother of One Hunahpu and Seven Hunahpu (mighty warriors).” [1]

“Xmucane and Xpiacoc (alternatively Xumucane and Ixpiyacoc) are the names of the divine grandparents of Maya mythology and the daykeepers of the Popol Vuh. They are considered to be the oldest of all the gods of the Maya pantheon, and are identified by a number of names throughout the Maya sacred text, reflecting their multiple roles throughout the Mayan creation myth. They are usually mentioned together, although Xmucane seems to be alone during most of the interactions with the Maya Hero Twins, when She is referred to as simply ‘grandmother’.

The pair were invoked during the creation of the world in which the Maya gods were attempting to create humanity. Xmucane and Xpiacoc ground the corn that was used in part of the failed attempt, although the beings created were described as being simply mannequins and not real people. These two are also invoked, often by other powerful deities, for their powers in divination and matchmaking.

“Bag of Corn” by Molybdenum-Blues

Xmucane Herself also plays an integral role in the development of the Maya Hero Twins. She was at first wary of them and their mother, Xquic, and ordered them out of Her house when they were yet infants, but She would come to accept them almost as Her own sons, raising and caring for them.

Twin brothers from the Mayan legend of creation by John Jude

Xmucane is considered by some to be the Goddess associated with the waxing moon, contrasting to the hypothetical role of Her daughter-in-law as the waning moon.” [2]

“Triple Goddess – Crone” by TwistedSwans

 

 

Sources:

Marks, Dominic. Lowchensaustralia.com, “Mayan Goddesses“.

Wikipedia, “Xmucane and Xpiacoc“.

 

Suggested Links:

Gallardo, Susana. SJSU WOMS 101, “Day 3 – Popol Vuh“.

MXTODIS123. An Inner Journey: The Moon, Mythology, and You, “Xmucane“.

Nathan. Vovatia.wordpress.com, “Oh, Maya Gods!“.

Sabrina. Goddess A Day, “Xmucane“.

Goddess Uto

“Snake Goddess” by dmarshallarts

“Uto’s themes are ecology , nature and magic. Her symbols are green items and snakes.  This ancient Egyptian Goddess bears a name that means ‘green one’. She embodies the earth’s regenerative force, specifically in its vegetation. Art often shows Uto in the form of a snake, ever transforming and renewing Herself and the earth. This tremendous magical power comes from being able to draw on the essence of creation and all that dwells therein. As she wields this beneficial energy, She inspires today’s activities by assisting our summer efforts to restore the planet.

I suspect this Goddess inspired the creation of World Environment Day in 1972, specifically to increase enthusiasm for global environmental causes and natural restoration. The United Nations continues to encourage its members to have special activities today that further earth-first thinking and world healing in all forms. So, put on something green today, get outside and get busy! Organize a recycling drive, pick up litter in a nearby park, plant some seedlings or trees, begin composting, make a donation to a reputable environmental group. Anything you can do to help restore the earth’s greenery honors and welcomes Uto’s regenerative spirit to the earth. Let Her guide you hands and efforts today, flowing through you with healthy energy, ministering to the earth.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Wadjet” by Blade68

According to J. Hill, “Wadjet (Wadjyt, Wadjit, Uto, Uatchet, Edjo, Buto) was one of the oldest Egyptian Goddesses. Her worship was already established by the Predynastic Period, but did change somewhat as time progressed. She began as the local Goddess of Per-Wadjet (Buto) but soon became a patron Goddess of Lower Egypt. By the end of the Predynastic Period She was considered to be the personification of Lower Egypt rather than a distinct Goddess and almost always appeared with Her sister Nekhbet (who represented Upper Egypt). The two combined represented the country as a whole and were represented in the pharaoh´s ‘nebty’ name (also known as ‘the two ladies’) which indicated that the king ruled over both parts of Egypt. The earliest recovered example of the nebty name is from the reign of Anedjib of the First Dynasty.

Pharaoh crowned by Nekhbet and Wadjet

In the Pyramid Texts it is suggested that She created the first papyrus plant and papyrus swamp. Her link to the papyrus is strengthened by the fact that Her name was written using the glyph of a papyrus plant and the same plant was the heraldic plant of Lower Egypt.

According to another myth Wadjet was the daughter of Atum (or later Ra) who was sent Her as his ‘eye‘ to find Tefnut and Shu when they were lost in the waters of Nun. He was so happy when they returned that he cried and created the first human beings from his tears. To reward his daughter, he placed Her upon his head in the form of a cobra so that She would always be close to him and could act as his protector.

She was one of the Goddesses given the title ‘Eye of Ra‘ (connecting Her to BastHathorSekhment and Tefnut amongst others). In fact the symbol of the ‘Eye of Ra’ was often called ‘the Wedjat’. In this form She was sent out to avenge Her father and almost caused the destruction of mankind. Humanity was saved when She was tricked with some beer which had been dyed red with pomegranate juice to resemble blood.

There is also a suggestion that She was very closely linked to the principle of Ma´at (justice or balance). Before being crowned as king, Geb attacked and raped his mother Tefnut. When he went to take his place as pharaoh and put the Royal Ureas on his own forehead, the snake reared up and attacked the god and his followers. All of Geb´s retinue died and the god himself was badly injured. Clearly, his actions were against Ma´at and Wadjet was not prepared to allow him to go unpunished.

Wadjet is often described as an agressive deity while while Her sister Nekhbet was thought of as a more matronly protector. However, She also had Her gentler side. Wadjet was believed to have helped Isis nurse the young Horus and to help mother and baby hide from Set in the marshes of the delta. She was also considered to offer protection to all women during childbirth.

She (and Her sister) also protected the adult Horus from the followers of Set. Horus pursued them in the form of a winged sun disc and Nekhbet and Wadjet flanked him in the form of crowned snakes. This protection was also extended towards the pharaoh who wore the ‘Royal Ureas’ (serpent) on his (or her) forehead. From the Eighteenth Dynasty the queens also added one or two snakes to their headdresses representing Wadjet and Her sister.

Wadjet was associated with the fifth hour of the fifth day of the month and with ‘iput-hmt’ (Epipi), the harvest month of the Egyptian calendarFestivals were held in Her honour on the 10th day of ‘rh-wr’ (Mekhir) which was also called ‘the day of going forth of the Goddess’, the 7th day of ‘khnty-khty’ (Payni) and the 8th day of ‘Wpt-rnpt’ (Mesori). These latter two dates coincide roughly with the winter and spring solstices.

She was worshiped at the Temple of Wadjet, known as ‘Pe-Dep’. This temple was already long established by the Old Kingdom and is referred to in the Pyramid Texts. In this temple, Wadjet was linked with Horus. Wadjet was thought to be the wife of Hapi in Lower Egypt and was linked to Set in his role as a representative of Lower Egypt. She was sometimes described as the wife of Ptah and the mother of Nefertem, probably because She occasionally took the form of a lion like Sekhmet.

Her sacred animal was the cobra, and She was often depicted as either a rearing cobra, a winged cobra, or a woman with the head of a cobra.She was also depicted as a woman wearing the red crown of Lower Egypt. She often appears with Her sister Nekhbet who was in as a snake or woman. By the Late Period She was also associated with the ichneumon (a mongoose-like creature). This animal was known for its skill in killing snakes and was also sacred to Horus.  The Egyptians placed mummified ichneumon and shrew (small mice) inside statuettes of Wadjet which were interred with the dead. The two animals represented day (ichneumon) and night (shrew). She was also worshipped as a vulture Goddess. In Her form of the ‘eye of Ra’ She was depicted as a lion-headed woman wearing a solar disc and the Uraeus (cobra).” [1]

 

 

 

Sources:

Hill, J. Ancient Egypt Online, “Wadjet“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Becoming an Oracle, “The Ancient Egyptian Cobra Oracle“.

Crystalinks, “Wadjet“.

Ferrebeekeeper, “Per-Wadjet“.

Harris, Catherine C. Tour Egypt, “Wadjet, the Serpent Goddess“.

Seawright, Caroline.  Kunoichi’s Web Page, “Wadjet, Goddess of Lower Egypt, Papyrus, and Protector of Pharaoh…

Wikipedia, “Wadjet“.

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