Tag Archive: filipino


Goddess Ikapati

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“Dewi Sri” by Much

“Ikapati’s themes are prayer, harvest, thanksgiving, luck and protection. Her symbols are harvested foods.  In the language of the Philippines, this Goddess’s name literally means ‘giver of food’, making Her the provider of the Misa de Gallo! She diligently promotes abundance of fields and crops, and She protects farm animals from disease.

When the sun begins to rise today, people take to the streets with all manner of noise makers to invoke Ikapati’s protection and to banish evil influences that might hinder next year’s crops. Effectively, even in more Christianized forms, this is a lavish harvest festival in which Filipinos thank the divine for their fortune and food, which is always a worthy endeavor.

We can join the festivities today by eating the customary rice cakes to internalize Ikapati’s providence and drinking ginger tea for health and energy. It is traditional during this meal to invite the Goddess to join you at the table. Just leave her a plate and cup filled with a portion of whatever you have.

Tonight, consign this offering to the earth, where Ikapati dwells (or to your compost heap), and whisper a wish for improved luck to the soil. The Goddess will then accept the gift and turn it into positive energy for the planet and your life.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

According to Wikipedia, Ikapati is an ancient Tagalog Goddess also known as Lakapati.  Lakapati is “the Goddess of fertility and the most understanding and kind of all the deities. Also known as Ikapati, She was the giver of food and prosperity. Her best gift to mankind was agriculture (cultivated fields). Through this, She was respected and loved by the people. Later, She was married to Mapulon and had a daughter.” [1]

Interestingly enough, I found on a few sites that Lakapati is described as a transgender or hermaphroditic deity.  In a book entitled Mythologies – A Polytheistic view of the World, it states: “Lakampati (Lacapati/Lacanpate) – the major fertility deity of the ancient Tagalogs.  Farmers with their children brought offerings for him at the fields and invoke him to protect them from famine.  Some sources also said that foods and words are offered to him by his devotees asking for ‘water’ for their fields and ‘fish’ when they set sail in the sea for fishing.  Lakampati was a hermaphrodite deity and was commented by some authors and friars as ‘the hermaphrodite devil who satisfies his carnal appetite with men and women’.  He is identified to the ancient Zambal Goddess Ikapati although he/she also has a characteristics similar to other Zambal deities such as Anitong Tawo, Dumangan, Kalasokus, and Kalaskas” (p. 120).

dewi_sri

“Dewi Sri” by Erwin Silman

According to Sri Owen, which was surprising to me, “Filipino rice spirits…are often male.  One group consisted of four brother gods: Dumangan, the god of good harvests and giver of grains; Kalaskas, who supervised the ripening of the rice grains; Kalasokus, in charge of the yellowing and drying of the crop ready for harvest; and Damulag, who protected the rice from wind (remember those terrible Philippines typhoons).  However, they had a female colleague, Ikapati, who was Goddess of cultivated lands and taught agriculture” (p. 54).  This leads me to wonder if Ikapati is somehow “related to” or has any connection with Dewi Sri, Mae PhosopPo Ino NogarWakasaname-no-Kami (who also is an androgynous deity)…

 

 

 

 

Sources:

Owen, Sri. The Rice Book: History, Culture, Recipes, “The Feminine Rice Spirit“.

Wikipedia, “Deities of Philippine mythology“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Halili, M. C. Philippine History.

Ramos, Michael. Polvoron: Tales and Stories from the Philippine Islands, “Pearls“.

Goddess Sisina

“Flora Study II” by Jia Lu

“Sisina’s themes are offering, prayer, love, devotion, home and relationships. Her symbols are Spring and May-blossoming flowers. This Filipino Goddess oversees the realms of orderliness, beauty and love. Traditionally, She protects marriages against discord, but She may also be called upon to settle inner turmoil within you soul and restore self-love.

Today concludes Flores de Mayo in which people in the Philippines say good-bye to May with bouquets, flower offerings and an array of sweet foods to honor the month’s sweetness and beauty. Sometimes they ask Sisina to joint the festivities by setting a place for Her at the table.

This particular custom appears in several other cultures and it is a simple lovely way of honoring the Goddess. Just leave a plate with a a fresh flower on your dinner table. This draws Sisina’s presence, love and peaceful nature to your home and family relationships. If you wish also leave an offering of sweet bread or fruity wine in a special spot to thank Her.

As you go about your normal routine today, take time to enjoy any flowers you see and be very considerate of the special people in your life. Sisina will see the effort and continue blessing those realtinships with harmony.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“spring shower 1of 4 seasons pressed flower art” by Shelley Xie

I could find no specific mention of a Goddess called “Sisina” for today’s entry.  While browsing through a list of Gods, Goddesses and Deities of the Philippines, I did find 2 Goddesses of love.  The first Goddess I found was Dian Masalanta, “the Goddess of love, pregnancy, child birth, and peace among the ancient Tagalogs. Ever since the arrival of the Spaniards, She has been known by the name, Maria Makiling, after Her mountain, Mount Makiling.” [1]

The second Goddess I found was Sehana, the Goddess of love who had the power to bestow love on any mortal or immortal being. [2]  I could find no other information on Sehana other the meaning of Sehana as a Filipino name for girls.

I did find mention of a Goddess called Bighari, who was the Goddess of flowers and daughter of Bathala (the supreme god of the ancient Tagalogs) who plays a role in the Filipino legend of the first rainbow.  Legend says that “one day Bathala planned a journey to Earth to visit his faithful people. He called his children to bid them farewell. All of them came but Bighari, the Goddess of Flowers.  Bathala, who valued promptness, became angry because this was not the first time that Bighari missed their gathering. Thus, he banished Her from their heavenly kingdom.  Bighari, at that time, was at Her garden on Earth. She wept bitterly when She was told of Her banishment. But She sought to cope with Her sorrow by causing Her garden to bloom profusely.

Goddess of Rainbows by JinxFlux

The legend of the rainbow says that the people that used to live around Her garden grew to love Her more and more for bringing beauty to their lives. They resolved, after a time, to build Her a bower so that they could see Her garden even from a long distance.

And so they built it, and decked it all over with colorful blooms. Thereafter, whenever Bighari would travel, people would see Her colorful bower against the sky.” [3]

 

 

 

Sources:

Mysterio delas Filipinas, “The Eternal Beings“.

Read-legends-and-myths.com, “The Rainbow Legend from the Philippines“.

WikiPilipinas, “Dian Masalanta“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Nosfecatu Publishing, “Taste Test: Dian Masalanta“.

Wikipedia, “Deities of Philippine Mythology“.

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