Tag Archive: communication


Goddess Istustaya

“Istustaya’s themes are divination, communication (with the Divine) and destiny. Her symbols are sacred dance, circles, mirrors and thread.  In Anatolia this Goddess rules over all matters of fate and is an adept diviner, often using a mirror for descrying so She can share insights into our future. Besides this, She personally weaves the thread of life for each person born, patterning his or her destiny.

The Mevlana is celebrated by the Whirling Dervishes in Turkey as a ritual dance through which the devout attains oneness with the Divine, often for the purpose of fortune-telling. The festival includes chanting while dancers twirl around, effectively becoming the center of a magical circle formed by their skirts. So, if you hold a ritual today, use yarn or thread to mark the sacred space, with a mirror and your preferred divinatory tool on the altar to honor Istustaya. Dance clockwise around the circle, or your home, before attempting any divinatory effort. This draws the Goddess’s vision into your spirit.

If you want to try mirror descrying specifically to venerate Istustaya, sit somewhere comfortable with a candle behind the mirror. Dab a little sandalwood oil in the surface, rubbing it clockwise. Let your eyes un-focus and wait to see what images appear in the reflected light and oil. These may be symbolic or literal in nature. A dream interpretation guide may help in figuring out the meaning.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Goddess of The Sea” by xxstarslayerxx

All I could find on today’s Goddess states that “Istustaya [was one of] two Goddesses of destiny with Hattian origin in Hittite religion.

The task of Istustaya and Papaya is to spin the tread of life, especially the one of the king. They sit at the shores of the Black Sea. After Telipinu’s return they take part on the conference of gods.” [1]

 

 

 

Sources:

Wikipedia, “Istustaya and Papaya“.

 

Suggested Links:

Bryce, Trevor. Life and Society in the Hittite World.

McMahon, Gregory; Gary M. Beckman; & Richard Henry Beal. Hittite Studies in Honor of Harry A. Hoffner, Jr.

Taracha, Piotr. Religions of Second Millennium Anatolia.

Wikipedia, “Istustaya and Papaya“.

Goddess Calliope

“The Nine Muses – Calliope – The muse of Epic Poetry” by Paul Vincenti

“Calliope’s themes are art, communication and history. Her symbols are stories, books, pens and pencils and quills. A member of the Thracian muses, Calliope is the Goddess of epic poetry and eloquence, whose symbol is that of a stylus and tablets. Greek stories claim that this Goddess is the mother of all poets and musicians.

Tellabration, a national storytelling festival in Connecticut, began in 1988 as a way of preserving and perpetuating oral traditions and the bardic art of telling ‘tall tales’ and good stories, which Calliope inspires. Today She joins our celebration to motivate creativity in all areas of our lives, especially written and spoken words.

In today’s hurry-up world we often forget how powerful a word or phrase can be. To honor this Goddess, slow down a little all day long, and really consider how you’re communicating your ideas.

As the old saying goes, be sure your brain is in gear before shifting your tongue to high. During those moments of contemplation, Calliope will flow through you and give you the words you need.

During a break, take out a beloved book and start reading it again (Walden is my choice). Calliope will help you find something new and wonderful in those pages to inspire you even further in any task you undertake today. And perhaps go out and buy yourself a special pen and pencil and bless them to use for important missives.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Calliope” by Joseph Fagnani

“In Greek mythology, Calliope (‘beautiful-voiced’) was the muse of epic poetry, daughter of Zeus and Mnemosyne, and is believed to be Homer‘s muse, the inspiration for the Odyssey and the Iliad.

One account says Calliope was the lover of the war god Ares, and bore him several sons: MygdonEdonusBiston, and Odomantus (or Odomas), respectively the founders of Thracian tribes known as the MygdonesEdonesBistones, and Odomantes.

Calliope also had two famous sons, Orpheus and Linus, by either Apollo or the king Oeagrus of Thrace. She taught Orpheus verses for singing. She was also the wisest of the Muses, as well as the most assertive. Calliope married Oeagrus close to PimpleiaOlympus.

Calliope is always seen with a writing tablet in Her hand. At times, She is depicted as carrying a roll of paper or a book or as wearing a gold crown.” [1]

 

 

 

Sources:

Wikipedia, “Calliope“.

 

Suggested Links:

Herwood, Mary Carol. Voices.yahoo.com, “The Greek Goddesses – #6 – the Muse Calliope“.

Theoi.com, “Mousai“.

Paleothea.com, “The Muses“.

Theoi.com, “KALLIOPE“.

Wikipedia, “Muse“.

Goddess Leucothea

“The Archer” by `Heidi-V-Art

“Leucothea’s themes are creativity, energy, communication, balance, harmony and change. Her symbols are bow and arrow, white items, milk and seawater.  In Greek tradition, this woman gave birth to the centaurs [though there seems to be some conflict in that] and was a wet nurse to Dionysus. Her name translates as ‘milk-white-Goddess’, alluding to a strong maternal nature. In later times She became a sea Goddess, bearing the visage of a mermaid. Through this transformation we see the mingling of the spiritual nature (water) with that of the earth (half-human appearance) to create Sagittarius’s customary energies.

In astrology, Sagittarius is the centurion archer who represents a harmonious mingling of physical and spiritual living. Those born under this sign tend toward idealism, upbeat outlooks, and confidence. Like Leucothea, Saggitarians seem to have a strong drive for justice, especially for those people under their care.

To consume a bit of Leucothea’s maternal nature or invoke Her spiritual balance in your life, make sure to include milk or milk products in your diet today. Or, wear something white to figuratively don Her power.

For help with personal transformations, especially those that encourage personal comfort and tranquillity, soak in a nice, long saltwater or milk bath today. As you do, ask Leucothea to show you the right steps to take next.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Elemental Goddess Water” by `AutumnsGoddess

“In Greek mythology, Leucothea (‘white Goddess’) was one of the aspects under which an ancient sea Goddess was recognized, in this case as a transformed nymph.

In the more familiar variant, Ino, the daughter of Cadmus, sister of Semele, and queen of Athamas, became a Goddess after Hera drove her insane as a punishment for caring for the newborn Dionysus. She leapt into the sea with her son Melicertes in her arms, and out of pity, the Hellenes asserted, the Olympian gods turned them both into sea-gods, transforming Melicertes into Palaemon, the patron of the Isthmian games, and Ino into Leucothea.

In the version sited at Rhodes, a much earlier mythic level is reflected in the genealogy: there, the woman who plunged into the sea and became Leucothea was Halia (‘of the sea’, a personification of the saltiness of the sea) whose parents were from the ancient generation, Thalassa and Pontus or Uranus. She was a local nymph and one of the aboriginal Telchines of the island.

Halia became Poseidon‘s wife and bore him Rhodos/Rhode and six sons; the sons were maddened by Aphrodite in retaliation for an impious affront, assaulted their sister and were confined beneath the Earth by Poseidon. Thus the Rhodians traced their mythic descent from Rhode and the Sun god Helios.

In the Odyssey (5.333 ff.) Leucothea makes a dramatic appearance as a gannet who tells the shipwrecked Odysseus to discard his cloak and raft and offers him a veil (kredemnon) to wind round himself to save his life and reach land. Homer makes Her the transfiguration of Ino. In Laconia, She has a sanctuary, where She answers people’s questions about dreams. This is Her form of the oracle.”

In more modern works, Leucothea is mentioned by Robert Graves in The White Goddess.

In Ezra Pound‘s Cantos, She is one of the Goddess figures who comes to the poet’s aid in Section: Rock-Drill (Cantos 85–95). She is introduced in Canto 91 as “Cadmus’s daughter”:

As the sea-gull Κάδμου θυγάτηρ said to Odysseus
KADMOU THUGATER
“get rid of parap[h]ernalia”

She returns in Cantos 93 (‘Κάδμου θυγάτηρ’) and 95 (‘Κάδμου θυγάτηρ/ bringing light per diafana/ λευκὁς Λευκόθοε/ white foam, a sea-gull… ‘My bikini is worth yr/ raft’. Said Leucothae… Then Leucothea had pity,/’mortal once/ Who now is a sea-god…'”), and reappears at the beginning of Canto 96, the first of the Thrones section (‘Κρήδεμνον…/ κρήδεμνον…/ and the wave concealed her,/ dark mass of great water.’).

Leucothea appears twice in Dialoghi con Leucò (Dialogues with Leucò) by Cesare Pavese.

Leucothoé was the first work by the Irish playwright Isaac Bickerstaffe published in 1756.

A similar name is carried by two other characters in Greek mythology.

Leucothoë: a mortal princess, daughter of Orchamus and sister of Clytia, Leucothoë loved Apollo, who disguised himself as Leucothea’s mother to gain entrance to her chambers. Clytia, jealous of her sister because she wanted Apollo for herself, told Orchamus the truth, betraying her sister’s trust and confidence in her. Enraged, Orchamus ordered Leucothoë buried alive. Apollo refused to forgive Clytia for betraying his beloved, and a grievous Clytia wilted and slowly died. Apollo changed her into an incense plant, either heliotrope or sunflower, which follows the sun every day.

Leucothoë: one of the Nereids.” [1]

“The Etruscan Losna may well be comparable.” [2]

“The Sacrifice of Iphigenia” by Timanthus

Now, concerning Ino, Patricia Monaghan tells us that Ino was the daughter of Harmonia, ‘she who makes sinewy’ and was originally a Goddess of orgiastic agricultural rites in pre-Helleinc Greece, to whom human victims apparently were sacraficed in a magical attempt to make rain fall as freely as blood on the soil.  When later tribes brought their own pantheon into Ino’s realm, the religious conflict that ensued was recorded in the legend that Ino was a rival of the King’s wife Nephele.  Ino brought on a famine and in punishment was pursued into the sea bearing Her son Melicertes.  Both were then ‘transformed’ into sea deities by Greek legend” (p. 163).

Wow, I thought, how could this be?  That seemed a bit of a stretch.  However, going back and reading about Ino from Wikipedia, it states: “In historical times, a sisterhood of maenads of Thebes in the service of Dionysus traced their descent in the female line from Ino; we know this because an inscription at Magnesia on the Maeander summoned three maenads from Thebes, from the house of Ino, to direct the new mysteries of Dionysus at Magnesia.” [3] Ah…there it is – there’s the connection between the orgiastic agricultural rites Monaghan spoke of and the Dionysian Mysteries.

 

 

 

Sources:

Mlahanas.de, “Leucothea“.

Monaghan, Patricia. The New Book of Goddesses and Heroines, “Ino”.

Wikipedia, “Leucothea“.

 

Suggested Links:

Theoi.com, “INO LEUKOTHEA“.

Wikipedia, “Ino“.

Goddess Nisaba

“Egyptian Girl with Snakes” by Frances Bramley Warren

“Nisaba’s themes are creativity, communication, excellence, inspiration, Universal Law, divination and dreams. Her symbols are pens, computers, books and snakes (Her sacred animal).  In Sumerian tradition, this Goddess’s name means ‘She who teaches the decrees’, referring specifically to imparting divine laws to humankind. In order to communicate these matters effectively, Nisaba invented literacy, and She uses creative energy to inspire scribes. Besides this, Nisaba is an oracular Goddess, well gifted in dream interpretation.

Since 1928, this day, Author’s Day, has been observed as a time to honor authors who have contributed to American literature and encourage new writers in their talents. If you’re an aspiring author, today’s definitely the time to submit a poem, article, or manuscript, invoking Nissaba’s on it before sending it out.  Also, take a moment to ask Nisaba to empower all your pens, pencils, resource books, computer, and so on, so that all your future writing efforts will be more successful and fulfilling.

For those who don’t consider authorship a forte, you can ask Nisaba to give you a symbolic dream instead.

Put a marigold, rose, or onion peel under your pillow to help with this, and keep a dream journal or tape recorder handy. Immediately upon waking, record any dream you recall. Then go to a favored dream guide, and whisper the Goddess’s name before looking up interpretations.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

Patricia Monaghan writes: “‘She who teaches the decress’ of divinity to humans, this Goddess brought literacy and astrology to a Sumerian king on a tablet inscribed with the names of the beneficent stars.  An architect as well, She drew up temple plans for Her people; She was also an oracle and dream interpreter.  The most learned of deities, this snake Goddess also controlled the fertility of Her people’s fields” (p. 231).

Nisaba’s “sanctuaries were E-zagin at Eresh and at Umma. On a depiction found in Lagash, She appears with flowing hair, crowned with horned tiara bearing supporting ears of corn and a crescent moon. Her dense hair is evoked in comparison in the description of similarly hairy Enkidu in the Gilgamesh epic.

As with many Sumerian deities, Nisaba’s exact place in the pantheon and Her heritage appears somewhat ambiguous. She is the daughter of An and Urash. From Sumerian texts, the language used to describe Urash is very similar to the language used to describe Ninhursag. Therefore, the two Goddess may be one and the same. Nisaba is the sister of Ninsun, the mother of Gilgamesh. If Urash and Ninhursag are the same Goddess, then Nisaba is also the half sister of Nanshe and (in some versions) Ninurta.

In some other tales, She is considered the mother of Ninlil, and by extension, the mother-in-law of Enlil.

The god of wisdom, Enki, organized the world after creation and gave each deity a role in the world order. Nisaba was named the scribe of the gods, and Enki then built Her a school of learning so that She could better serve those in need. She keeps records, chronicles events, and performs various other bookwork related duties for the gods. She is also in charge of marking regional borders.

She is the chief scribe of Nanshe. On the first day of the new year, She and Nanshe work together to settle disputes between mortals and give aid to those in need. Nisaba keeps record of the visitors seeking aid and then arranges them into a line to stand before Nanshe, who will then judge them. Nisaba is also seen as a caretaker for Ninhursag’s temple at Kesh, where She gives commands and keeps temple records.

The Goddess of writing and teaching, She was often praised by Sumerian scribes. Many clay-tablets end with the phrase “Nisaba be praised” to honor the Goddess. She is considered the teacher of both mortal scribes and other divine deities. In the Babylonian period, She was replaced by the god Nabu, who took over Her functions. In some instances, Nisaba was his instructor or wife before he replaced Her.

As the Goddess of knowledge, She is related to many other facets of intellectual study and other gods may turn to Her for advice or aid. Some of these traits are shared with Her sister Ninsina. She is also associate with grain, reflecting Her association with an earth Goddess mother.” [1]

Also seen as Nissaba, Nidaba, Nanibgal, and Nunbarshegunu (lady whose body is dappled barley).

 

 

 

Sources:

Monaghan, Patricia. The New Book of Goddesses and Heroines, “Nisaba”.

Sabrina. Goddess A Day, “Nisaba“.

Wikipedia, “Nidaba“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Agaliha. Mysticwicks.com, “Thread: Nisaba {Goddess of the Week}“.

Artesia. Goddessschool.com, “Nisaba: Sumerian Wise Woman and Mother Goddess“.

Black, Jeremy & Anthony Green. Gods, Demons and Symbols of Ancient Mesopotamia: An Illustrated Dictionary, “Nisaba“.

Etcsl.orinst.ox.ac.uk, “A Hymn to Nisaba (Nisaba A): translation“.

Gatewaystobabylon.com, “Nabu“.

Lambert, Wilfred G. Babylonian Wisdom Literature, “Nisaba and Wheat“.

Monaghan, Patricia. Goddesses in World Culture, Volume 1, “Nisaba of Eresh: Goddess of Grain, Goddess of Writing“.

Robson, Eleanor. Mathematics in Ancient Iraq: A Social History.

Sitarik, Jessica. Crystalvaults.com, “Nisaba: Sumerian Knowledge Goddess“.

Stuckey, Johanna. Matrifocus.com, “Ancient Grain Goddesses of the Eastern Mediterranean“.

Tudeau, Johanna. Oracc.museum.upenn.edu, “Nidaba (goddess)“.

Goddess Nótt

“Nott” by Giovanni Caselli

“Nótt’s themes are learning, knowledge and communication. Her symbols are books, writing utensils and stars. A Teutonic Goddess of the night sky, Nótt generates artistic inspiration and knowledge. She refreshes those suffering from creative blockages and arouses new visions for any endeavor, especially when fall’s declining energies get the best of us. Myths portray Nótt as bearing the silver-studded night sky like a blanket across the dusk. Her chariot bears a frost mare, alluding to the moon.

Buchmesse is the world’s largest book fair for the publishing industry, featuring exhibitors from over ninety countries and attended by over two hundred thousand people. In this region of the world, book fairs have been around for over eight hundred years, making Germany one of the centers of world literacy.

For writers, today is the perfect time to ask for Nótt’s blessing on your efforts. Submit a poem, article, or manuscript to potential publishers. Write in your journal. Draft a meaningful ritual for improved creativity, and let Nótt’s energy guide your hand.

Alternatively, read a favorite poem or book – Nótt’s power is beneath those words – or make a book donation to the local library to honor this Goddess’s contribution to human civilization.

Finally, gather all your pens and pencils in a basket and empower them for all your writings by saying:

‘Nótt, inspire creativity
when taken to hand
then magic is free!'”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Nótt” by Peter Nicolai Arbo.

“In Norse mythology, Nótt is night personified, grandmother of Thor. In both the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, and the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson, Nótt is listed as the daughter of a figure by the name of Nörvi (with variant spellings) and is associated with the horse Hrímfaxi, while the Prose Edda features information about Nótt’s ancestry, including Her three marriages. Nótt’s third marriage was to the god Dellingr and this resulted in their son Dagr, the personified day (although some manuscript variations list Jörð as Dellingr’s wife and Dagr’s mother instead). As a proper noun, the word nótt appears throughout Old Norse literature.” [1]

Timelessmyths.com tells us that “Nott was the daughter of a giant named Norfi or Narfi, but two Eddaic poems called Nott’s father, Norr (not to be confused with Nór), primarily for reasons of alliteration.

Nott had three husbands, and had a child with each of Her husband. Her first husband was a giant, called Naglfari, and they had a son named Aud.

Her second husband was named Annar (Onar), who was probably also a giant, and they had a daughter, named Jörd (Earth), the mother of Thor.

Her last husband belonged to the Aesir and he was named Delling. Their son was named Day (Dag), god of day.

“Dagr” by Peter Nicolai Arbo

When the Aesir created the world, Odin gave a chariot to Her and another chariot to Her son Day. They travelled the sky, following one another, as day follow night. Her horse was called Hrimfaxi, ‘Frost-mane’, which caused dew from the horse’s bit. While Her son’s horse was called Skinfaxi, which means ‘Shining-mane’, because the mane was so radiant that it brought light to the world.” [2]

 

 

Sources:

Timelessmyths.com, “Nott“.

Wikipedia, “Nótt“.

 

Suggested Links:

Krasskova, Galina. Northernpaganism.org, “The Northern Sky: Praising Nott“.

Marks, Dominic. Lowchensaustralia.com, “Norse Goddess Names: Nott“.

“Ti Chih Hsing Chun’s themes are learning, communication, karma and history. Her symbols are all alphabets, paper and pen or pencil.  This Goddess is the record keeper of heaven in this part of the world, making detailed notes of all good and evil deeds. As such, She makes us more aware of the importance of effective communication and keeping accurate histories. Ti Chih Hsing Chun also reminds us of how our actions (or inaction) affect all things, helping us get our karma back in balance.

This day, Hangul Day, commemorates the origination of the Korean alphabet, which became the official writing system and heralded a new age of development for the Korean people. Koreans traditionally practice handwriting (or calligraphy) on this day, which for us translates into carefully tending to your personal journal or book of shadows (your personal spell and ritual collection).

As you write, invoke the Goddess’s aid for accuracy. Also review the notes you’ve made thus far this year. Ti Chih Hsing Chun lives in those words and will show you how much your spirit has grown toward true Goddess-centered living. This awareness inspires hope, which in turn will energize your efforts through the next two months.

Finally, consider learning a new alphabet type today, such as the runes. These magical sigils provide all types of symbols to empower your spells, and they can become useful tools in expressing ideas not easily communicated with words.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

Well, I could nothing on today’s Goddess.  Based on Her description as a “record keeper of heaven making detailed notes of all good and evil deeds” and connection with karma, I believe Ti Chih Hsing Chun may be an epithet or alternate name for the Chinese Goddess Tou Mou.

Goddess Ennoia

“Yemanja/The Awakening of the Heart” by A. Andrew Gonzalez

“Ennoia’s themes are mediation, communication, magic and knowledge. Her symbols are angels. In Gnostic tradition, Ennoia is the Goddess of knowledge, intention and thought. Through Her all things were designed and manifested, including the angels. Through Ennoia we can learn the art of magic and how to communicate with angels as mediators between us and the Gods.

Today is Guardian Angel Day, a time to give thanks to the angels in our lives – those powers and people who protect, inspire and watch over us. One easily adapted tradition from Spain is that of wearing scarves and bells. These represent the beauty and music angels are said to bear into human life.

Second, take a moment to give back to the people in your life who have been like earthly angels (you know, the folks who bring soup when you’re sick, or offer money when funds are tight). Do something really nice for them, or minimally, light a candle on their behalf asking for angelic blessings in their lives.

Finally, try to connect with your guiding guardian angel(s). During your daily prayers or meditation, ask that power to reveal itself in words comfortable to you. Wait, watch and listen. The angel may reveal itself as the sound of bells or quiet music, with radiant light, or in other manifestations. If the being speaks with you, write down the words and ponder them in the days ahead.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

According to the blog, Prayers and Reflections, “Ennoia means ‘thought’ Sophia in Her high form as Pleromic, is the first thought (so She is the first Aeon, or Pleroma, and the last one as well). Creation happens in the triad of thought, word, and action.” [1]

“Alchemico d’Amore” by A. Andrew Gonzalez

“The Ennoia is important in Gnostic Magic, because She is the feminine counterpart or spiritual consort of God. She is the Womb of all manifestation, and thus is similar to the Egyptian Goddess Nut or Nuit. In a psychological (Jungian) sense, She is the archetype of the feminine principle.” [2]

I came across a lot of interesting information while researching this Goddess; everything from identifying Her with Sophia and the Holy Spirit, as Divine Female – the Wisdom Goddess who assisted in creation to being stripped of Her holiness, portrayed as foolish, conceiving alone without a male consort resulting malformed creatures and “falls” to the “lower” world, into bondage and even whoredom in need of rescuing (see The Ennoia).  In an attempt to demote, degrade and overthrow Her, the patriarchy even splits Her,  “Through disconnecting from the divine oneness it is also Sophia who has to exist in two forms: Sofia Ennoia i.e. the High Sofia, Neverending One, The Power of the Thoughts as well as the Low Sofia called the Small Sophia or Sophia of Death. In this way Sophia combines two elements: the divine and the human one.” [3]  I even found a few references to Her as being a daughter of Lilith….Not sure if this is a totally different deity or what the deal with that is…a little confusing….

Max Dashú has a lot to say about Her and Her “downfall” and can be read on Suppressedhistories.net by clicking here (scroll down to The Gnostic Goddess).

 

 

 

Sources:

Dashú, Max. Suppressedhistories.net, “Khokhmah and Sophia“.

Landofgoddesses.wordpress.com, “SOPHIA (CHOKMAH/SHEKHINAH)“.

Magdelene.wordpress.com, “Gnostic words for May 14, 2007: Ennead, Ennoia, Epiphanes, Epiphanius, Epinoia, Eros“.

Schuelers.com, “A BRIEF HISTORY OF GNOSTICISM“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Forrest, M. Isidora. Isis Magic: Cultivating a Relationship With the Goddess of 10,000 Names, “The Gnostic Sophia” (p. 193).

Magisteria.wordpress.com, “Ennoia, A Gnostic Tale“.

Metaconscious.tumblr.com, “Ennoia“.

Wikipedia, “Sophia (Gnosticism): The Ennoia“.

Goddess Rhiannon

“Rhiannon’s Ride” by Selina Fenech

“Rhiannon’s themes are movement, communication, rest, ghosts, fertility and leadership. Her symbols are the color white, horses and the moon.  This Celtic horse Goddess rides into our festival calendar today on a white mare bearing fertility, leadership, and a means to get things moving where they may have stagnated. Some historians believe the swiftness of Her steed (which is white, a lunar color) alludes to a lunar Goddess. In stories, Rhiannon commands singing birds that can wake spirits or grant sleep to mortals.

In Britain, people would come to Berkshire hillside today to partake in the White Horse Festival in which they scour the white horse that adorns the grasses here. This ancient galloping steed is created from pale clay, and this ritual kept it, and Rhiannon’s memory, vibrant.  So, if you have any images of horses (magazines, statuary, paintings) around, dust them off and put them in a place of honor today.

Since this was a festival for horses, you might consider tending to your own ‘horse’, be it a car or a bicycle!

Give it a tune-up or oil change, then take a ride! As you go, visualize yourself on the back of Rhiannon’s horse moving swiftly toward attending productivity or improved authority wherever you need it. Alternatively, wear something silver or white so that Rhiannon’s lunar energies can begin filtering into your day through the color’s vibrations.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

This is pretty much a repeat of the entry I did on Rigantona back June 28.

“Rhiannon” by Caroline Gully-Lir

The great Goddess Rhiannon is a potent symbol of fertility, yet She is also an Otherworld and death Goddess, a bringer of dreams, and a moon deity who is symbolized by a white horse. Her father was Heveydd the Old, and She was married to both Pwyll and Manan. The story of Her marriage to Pwyll, and the subsequent accusation of the murder of Her child, is well documented and most people are familiar with Rhiannon from this tale. [Click here to read Her tale].

“Rhiannon” by Susan Seddon Boulet

Patricia Monaghan comments: “What can one expect of a Goddess of death? Her son disappeared, and the queen was found with blood on Her mouth and cheeks. Accused of murder, She was sentenced to serve as Pwyll’s gatekeeper, bearing visitors to the door on Her back; thus She was symbolically transformed into a horse. All ended happily when Her son was found; Rhiannon had been falsely accused by maids who, terrified at finding the babe absent, had smeared puppy blood on the queen’s face.

Behind this legend is doubtless another, more primitive one in which the death queen actually was guilty of infanticide. This beautiful queen of the night would then, it seems, be identical to the Germanic Mora, the nightmare, the horse-shaped Goddess of terror. But night brings good dreams as well as bad, so Rhiannon was said to be the beautiful Goddess of joy and oblivion, a Goddess of Elysium as well as the queen of hell” (p. 266 – 267).

“Rhiannon” by Helena Nelson-Reed

“In Her guise as a death Goddess, Rhiannon could sing sweetly enough to lure all those in hearing to their deaths, and therefore She may be related to Germanic stories of lake and river faeries who sing seductively to lure sailors and fishermen to their doom. Her white horse images also link Her to Epona, and many scholars feel they are one and the same, or at least are derived from the same archetypal roots.

In today’s magick and ritual, Rhiannon can be called upon to aid you in overcoming enemies, exercising patience, working magick, moon rituals, and enhancing dream work.” [2]

“Call upon Rhiannon to bless rites of fertility, sex magick, prosperity and dream work. Work with Her to enhance divination skills, overcome enemies, develop patience, and to gain self confidence. She is most definitely a Fae that every woman can relate to on some level. Her perserverance and will is an example of what we as women are, have been, and will continue to be for millennia to come. Solid, unwavering beauty and strength, like Mother Earth below our feet.” [3]

 

ASSOCIATIONS:

General: Moon, horses, horseshoe, songbirds, gates, the wind, and the number 7.

Animals: Horse, badger, frog, dogs (especially puppies), canaries and other songbirds,hummingbirds, and dragons.

Plants: Narcissus and daffodils, leeks, pansies, forsythia, cedar and pine trees [evergreens], bayberry, sage and rosemary,[jasmine, any white flower]

Perfumes/Scents: Sandalwood, neroli, bergamot, lavender, narcissus, and geranium.

Gems and Metals: Gold, silver, cat’s eye, moonstone, crystal, quartz, ruby, red garnet, bloodstone, turquoise, and amethyst.

Colors: Dark green, maroon, gold, silver, rich brown, white, black, charcoal grey, and ruby red.   [4]

Element: Earth

Sphere of Influence: Animals and fertility

Best Day to Work with: Monday

Suitable Offerings: Music

Associated Planet: Moon    [5]

Moon Phase: Waning

Aspects: Leadership, movement, change, death, fertility, crisis, magic for women, protection, strength and truth in adversity, dreams

Wheel of the Year: Willow Moon (Saille): April 15 – May 12

Ivy Moon (Gort): September 30 – October 27   [6]

 

 

Great Goddess, help me remember that times of sorrow are opportunities for the greatest growth.  Rhiannon, I affirm that I have the courage to overcome my doubts and fears.

And here’s a great 13 minute video on Goddess Rhiannon, The Great Queen

Sources:

Goddessgift.com, “Goddess Symbols: Rhiannon“.

LadyRavenMoonshadow. Within the Sacred Mists, “The Celtic Tradition of Witches and Wiccans“.

Monaghan, Patricia. The New Book of Goddesses and Heroines, “Rhiannon”.

PaganNews.com, “Rhiannon“.

 

 

Rhiannon – Divine Queen

Saille, Rowen. Order of the White Moon, “Rhiannon: Great Queen of the Celts“.

Suggested Links:

Barkemeijer de Wit, R. Celestial Journey Therapy, “Who is Goddess Rhiannon?

Epona.net, “Later Influences of Epona“.

Goddessgift.com, “Activities to Invoke the Goddess Rhiannon“.

Goddessgift.com, “Meditations to Invoke the Goddess Rhiannon“.

Goddessgift.com, “Rhiannon, Celtic Goddess“.

Griffith, Carly. PaganPages.org, “Rhiannon“.

The Mabinogion, “Rhiannon“.

Monaghan, Patricia. The Encyclopedia of Celtic Mythology and Folklore, “Mórrígan” (p. 339 – 340)

Nemeton, The Sacred Grove: Home of the Celtic gods, “Rhiannon, A Cymric and Brythonic Goddess, also known as Rigatona: Great Queen“.

Revel, Anita. Reconnect with Your Inner Goddess, “Rhiannon“.

Shaw, Judith. Feminismandreligion.com, “Rhiannon, Goddess of Birds and Horses“.

Sisterhood of Avalon, “The Goddesses“.

Took, Thalia. A-Muse-ing Grace Gallery, “Rhiannon“.

Took, Thalia. The Obscure Goddess Online Directory, “Epona“.

Wikipedia, “Epona“.

Wikipedia, “Rhiannon“.

Goddess Hina

“Hina” by Susan Seddon Boulet

“Hina’s themes are the moon, communication, cycles and mediation. Her symbols are lunar (silver/white items or any corresponding plants/stones) and coconuts.  This Tahitian Goddess is the Lady in the Moon who shines on us with Her changing faces. As the dark moon, She presides over death. As the waxing moon, She is the creatrix who made people from clay and the moon, Her home. As the full moon, She embodies a mature woman’s warrior spirit. As the waning moon, She is the aging crone full of wisdom and insight.

According to tradition, coconuts were created from the body of Hina’s lover, an eel god, after he was killed by superstitious locals. She also governs matters of honest communication and when properly propitiated, Hina sometimes acts as an intermediary between humans and the gods.

On July 20, 1969, American astronauts visited Hina in person, landing on the moon’s surface and exploring it. In spiritual terms this means taking time to explore the magical nature of the moon today. If the moon is dark, it represents the need to rest from your labors. If it is waxing, start a new magic project and stick with it so the energy grows like the moon. If Hina’s lunar sphere is full, turn a coin in your pocket three times, saying “prosperity” each time so your pocket remains full. If the moon is waning, start taking positive action to rid yourself of a nagging problem. Eat some coconut to help this along by internalizing Hina’s transformative powers.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Hina” by Lisa Hunt

Patricia Monaghan has this to say about the Goddess Hina, “The greatest Polynesian Goddess was a complex figure of whom many myths were told.  Like other major divinities, She was associated with many aspects of life and had many symbols: She was the tapa-beating woman who lived in the moon; She was Great Hina, the death mother; She was a warrior  queen of the Island of Women.  An all-inclusive  divine archetype, Hina appeared in many Polynesian legends, some of which – not surprisingly, for such a complex and long-lived Goddess – contradicted others.

In some legends, Hina was said to have been created of red clay by the first man.  But others – in Tahiti, for instance – knew Hina as the preeminent Goddess, for whose sexual pleasure the first man was created.  This Goddess has two faces, one in front as humans do, one at the back of Her head. She was the first female being on earth, many bearing Her name.

One of these was the dawn Goddess Hine-tita-ma, who was seduced by Her own father, while unaware of his identity.  Furious and ashamed on discovering this trickery, Hina ran away to Po, the Polynesian underworld; this was the first death in creation.  Her fury was so unquenchable that She announced Her intention of killing any children begotten by Her father, thereby assuring that death would remain a force on earth.

“Hina” by Herb Kane

How the Goddess Hina reached the moon – She who had originally lived on earth and populated it  – was a matter of numerous myths.  In Tahiti, Hina was a canoeist who enjoyed the sport so much that She sailed to the moon, which proved to be such a good boat that She stayed there, guarding earthly sojourners.  Others told of Hina being sent to the moon by violence.  Her brother, hung over from indulgence in kava, became infuriated at the noise Hina made while beating tape cloth.  When She would not cease Her labors for Her brother’s convenience, he hit Her, sending Her sailing into the sky.  Because tapa-beating was thought to be like the process by which the human body is slowly beaten down to death, this Hina of the moon, the tapa-maker of the sky, was closely related to the Great Hina of the underworld.  Finally, a Hawaiian variant of these legends said that Hina, a married woman, grew tired of constantly picking up after Her family and She simply left the earth to pursue a career as the moon’s clothmaker.

“Hina” by by Joanna Carolan

One guise Hina wore was a warrior of the Island of Women, a place where no men were allowed, where trees alone impregnated the residents.  A man washed up on the shore and slept with Hina, the ageless and beautiful leader. He stayed for some time.  But every time She began to show Her years, Hina went surfing and came back renewed and restored.  At the same time, Her human lover gradually bowed under the years.  Hina returned the man to his people on a whale, which the humans impudently and imprudently killed.  The whale was Hina’s brother, and She sent terrible sufferings on the people  as a result.

Among all the many stories of Hina, however, probably the most commonly known one was that of the Goddess and Her lover, the eel.  Living on earth as a mortal woman, Hina bathed in a quiet pool where, one day, She had intercourse with an eel.  Her people, afraid of the power of the serpent, killed him, only to find that Hina had been mating with a god.

Furious and despairing at having Her affair so terminated, Hina took the eel’s head and buried it. Five nights later the first coconut there, a staple product thereafter to Hina’s folk” (p. 153).

 

 

 

Sources:

Monaghan, Patricia. The New Book of Goddesses and Heroines, “Hina”.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Circlingin, “Hina- Woman in the Moon- selected from the ‘Goddesses Knowledge Cards’ by Susan Seddon Boulet and Michael Babcock“.

Hall, Leigh. Order of the White Moon, “The Goddess Hina“.

King, Serge Kahili. Aloha International, “Hawaiian Goddesses“.

MXTODIS123. An Inner Journey: The Moon, Mythology, and You, “Goddess Hina“.

Powersthatbe.com, “Goddess HINA“.

Revel, Anita. igoddess.com, “Hina: champion of words“.

Sacred-texts.com, “HINA, THE WOMAN IN THE MOON“.

Skye, Michelle. Goddess Aloud! Transforming Your Mind Through Rituals & Mantras, “Hina: Hawaiian Goddess of Self-Liberation“.

Tate, Karen. Sacred Places of Goddess: 108 Destinations, “Rainbow Falls“.

Telesco, Patricia. Gardening With the Goddess: Creating Gardens of Spirit and Magick, “Hina: Warrior Garden“.

Wikipedia, “Hina (goddess)“.

Holy Spirit

“The Angel of Healing” by Aeoliah

“The Holy Spirit’s themes are communication, mediation, universal law, blessings, change, health, purity and truth. Her symbols are light.  In both Gnostic and Hebrew writings, the Holy Spirit is a female force. In New Age vernacular, She is seen as white light energy. The Holy Spirt pours upon people to communicate divine missives, including messages of well-being and blessing. She also mediates on our behalf with other facets of the divine, using order, universal law, and wisdom as a force for positive change.

Shavuot, or The Feast of Weeks, in Jewish tradition centers around the return of Moses from Mount Sinai bearing the Ten Commandments and the promises made by God for a home ‘flowing with milk and honey.’ Consequently, suitable edibles today include dairy products and anything sweetened with honey to internalize divine promises for your life. To know what those promises might be, ask the Holy Spirit to show you: pray and meditate. Visualize a a sparkling white light pouring over you. Write down any insights, images or phrases that come during this time. Don’t be surprised if you get words in a different language. This is glossolalia (tongues) and may reveal secrets about past lives through the languages represented. If you don’t have time for meditation, at least burn a white candle today to honor the Holy Spirit and Her spiritual gifts.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

 

“Sophia” by Hrana Janto

“Among the most ancient Jews and Christians it was understood that the Holy Spirit is female.  The earliest gospel, Mark, states that the Holy Spirit descended like a dove.  The word for ‘dove’ in Greek is peristera, and it carries the feminine gender.  The Hebrew word ruach meaning ‘Spirit’ is also feminine.  The Hebrew phrase Ruach Elohim is used throughout the Old Testament for ‘Spirit of God.’ [1]

This entry is going to be a little different from the others.  There was SO MUCH information on the internet to go through that it was impossible (for the purpose of this blog) to sum it up to put together and write an entry.  Instead, I included this very informative video explaining how the original biblical languages (Hebrew and Aramaic)  described the Holy Spirit as being female and how today’s popular and widely accepted mistranslated versions of the Bible hide and deny the Truth.

 

 

As usual, I’ve also included some suggested links (some of which include their own suggested links to aid your own research).

 

 

 

Suggested Links:

Goddessgift.com, “Sophia, Goddess of Wisdom“.

The Holy Spirit-Shekinah

The Holy Spirit-Shekinah, Sophia: Lost Goddess of Wisdom“.

The Holy Spirit-Shekinah, “The Holy Spirit: the Christian Goddess“.

Hurtak, J.J. The Pistis Sophia, “The Holy Spirit: The Feminine Aspect of the Godhead“.

The Nazarene Way, “Wisdom of the Goddess“.

Romanoff, Katia. Esoteric Theological Seminary, “Sophia: Goddess of Wisdom & God’s Wife“.

Spiralotus. The Order of the White Moon, “Shekenah“.

Spriritbride.org, “Is There a Christian Goddess?

Spiritual Adventures, “Sophia, Holy Spirit, Wisdom of God“. (This blog has a huge “Lists of Interest” and “Sites I Recommend”…happy researching!)

Wikipedia, “Sophia (wisdom)“.

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