Tag Archive: beans


Goddess Carna

“Goddess” by ~helushia

“Carna’s themes are health, kinship, change and opportunity. Her symbols are beans and pork. Carna presides over all matters of physical and spiritual health, well-being and wholeness. Carna is also the patroness of the hinge, meaning She can help us open or close any doors in our life.*

Romans traditionally gathered with their family on this day, offering Carna beans and pork to thank her for continued good health. This translates into a meal of pork, beans and bacon with spelt to internalize Her well-being. If you’re a vegetarian, just stick with the beans.

To get Carna’s assistance in getting an opportunity to open up, try this bit of sympathetic magic: Take any bean and go to your door. Stand before the door and say,

‘Carna, help this magic begin; my future turns on your hinge.
Open the way, starting today!’

Open the door as you say ‘open the way’, and put the bean outside in a safe place to draw Carna’s opportunities to you.

To permanently close a chapter in your life, just alter the spell a bit. This time begin with the door open saying,

‘Carna, help me leave the past behind;
by this spell this situation bind.
Away it goes, the door is closed!’

Put the bean outside the door and close it as you say ‘the door is closed,’ leaving the problem outside your life.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Goddess of Health” by prismadragonfly

“Carna is a protective Roman Goddess, who brings strength of the physical body. Her name is related to the Latin caro, ‘flesh’, and She protects and keeps healthy the vital organs, especially the lungs, liver and heart. At Her festival it was traditional to serve a soup made from bacon and beans; She is also the Goddess who helps the body derive nourishment from food, and to convert it to physical health and strength.

Her festival on the 1st of June was called the Fabrariae Calendae (the ‘Calends of the Beans’, fabae being ‘beans’—which I guess makes ‘fava bean’ redundant), from the offerings made. As mentioned above, the traditional food of the day was a dish of beans and bacon with spelt (a grain which is related to wheat), believed to be an especially strengthening dish, which is quite true, as they all contain a lot of protein. Eating this dish on this day was said to protect one’s internal organs and bring health for the following year. The poet Ovid, though he confuses Her with the Goddess Cardea, says that the association of these simple foods with this Goddess proves Her great antiquity. These offerings were made in a sacred grove in which Carna was said to live, down by the Tiber river, and which was dedicated to the otherwise unknown God Alernus (or Helernus).

Carna had a sanctuary on the Caelian Hill, the most south-eastern of the seven hills, traditionally vowed by L. Junius Brutus, the very first consul (whose surname means “Idiot”, by the by) on the 1st of June at the very beginning of the Roman Republic, which is usually said to have been around 510 BCE. This sanctuary or temple may have stood for a good 700 years, as it is mentioned in the writings of Tertullian, a 3rd century Christian who was trained as a lawyer. However, he calls Her a Hinge-Goddess (that is, Cardea), so perhaps he had the wrong Goddess (and wrong shrine) too.

* Carna is still confused with Cardea, the Goddess of Door-hinges, which is Ovid‘s fault; they are not related at all, merely having similar names. The story I’ve given under Cardea, where She protects a child from vampires with whitethorn, was told of Carna by Ovid; though he hopelessly mixes Them up, the Goddess in the tale does offer the vital organs of a pig as substitute for those of the child attacked by the vampire, so perhaps Carna was meant after all, as the vital organs are Her subject.

Also called: Carnea, Dea Carna.” [1]

Sources:

Took, Thalia. The Obscure Goddess Online Directory, “Carna“.

Suggested Links:

Her Cyclopedia, “Cardea“.

Monaghan, Patricia. Encyclopedia of Goddesses and Heroines, “Carna“.

MXTODIS123. An Inner Journey: The Moon, Mythology, and You, “Festival of Carna: June 1“.

Piscinus. Patheos, “Cardea: Blessing the Doorway“.

Took, Thalia. The Obscure Goddess Online Directory, “Cardea“.

Wikipedia, “Cardea“.

Goddess Iyatiku

"Corn Dawn Mother" by Marti Fenton

“Iyatiku’s themes are Earth, the harvest, providence, health and weather.  Her symbols are corn, beans, seeds and soil. Iyatiku is the Pueblo corn and underworld Goddess who protects not only future crops but the future in general by safeguarding children. During the early months of the year, Iyatiku extends arms of compassion to embrace us with nurturing support, just as the earth nurtures seeds.

If you have a garden, today is an excellent time to dance on the land and invoke Iyatiku’s blessings on your crops or flowers. The Pueblo and Hopi Indians have spirit dancers waltz around the land to instill the crops with energy through sacred movements.

The Hopi also plant beans on top of underground ritual rooms called kivas, which house Iyatiku’s nurturing energy. When children go into kivas for rites of passage, they emerge as adults thanks to the Goddess’s care and guidance within.

Using this symbolism to foster maturity or any other of Iyatiku’s attributes today, go today to some place close to the earth, taking a bean with you. Plant the bean, then sit on top of the ground covered with a blanket (a mock cave/ womb/ kiva). Meditate here, focusing on the bean, the rich earth below you and the earth’s generative energy. Allow Iyatiku to meet you in this sacred space and begin manifesting what you most need.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

Iyatiku is the corn Goddess of the Keresan Puebloes. From shipap, Her underground realm, mankind first ermerged, from there infants today are born and tither go the dead. To provide food for them, She plants bits of her heart in fields to the north, west, south, and east. Later the pieces of Iyatiku’s heart grow into fields of corn. The Cochiti Puebloes regard Mesewi as the hero who had led the ancestors of the tribe out of shipap. [1]

Click here for further information on Her titles and variants.

Goddess Shirata

” Black as Ebony, White as Snow” by MorningMiracle

“Shirata’s themes are luck, protection, cycles and happiness.  Her symbols are a snowflake, beans and the color white.  This Japanese Goddess embodies the first snow, where she glistens and shines with incomparable beauty until she freely and joyfully gives herself to spring’s warmth and melts away. By so doing, Shirata reminds us that while the year has only just begun, the wheel of time is ever moving and that we should make the most of every moment.

For happiness, cut a snowflake pattern out of a quartered piece of white paper and carry it with you in your wallet as a charm. Make sure to visualize the snowflake being filled with brilliant white light, like that which is seen when the sun shines off new-fallen snow.

Setsubun (Bean-Throwing Festival) takes place the day before the beginning of spring in Japan. This day is a time to chase away any malevolent influences that might hinder Shirata’s joyful nature within us. People scatter beans and make loud noises to banish evil and carve lanterns with wishes to light the way for a better tomorrow. For our purposes, scatter seeds on the ground or plant beans instead so something as beautiful as Shirata can replace any negativity in your life with abundant growth.

To internalize Shirata’s happiness, prepare any white beans and eat them as a part of a meal today. If you hold any rituals, use beans to mark the magic circle, scattering them counter-clockwise to banish any unwanted influences.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

Other than what Patricia Telesco says about this Goddess, I could find no other information.

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