“Istustaya’s themes are divination, communication (with the Divine) and destiny. Her symbols are sacred dance, circles, mirrors and thread.  In Anatolia this Goddess rules over all matters of fate and is an adept diviner, often using a mirror for descrying so She can share insights into our future. Besides this, She personally weaves the thread of life for each person born, patterning his or her destiny.

The Mevlana is celebrated by the Whirling Dervishes in Turkey as a ritual dance through which the devout attains oneness with the Divine, often for the purpose of fortune-telling. The festival includes chanting while dancers twirl around, effectively becoming the center of a magical circle formed by their skirts. So, if you hold a ritual today, use yarn or thread to mark the sacred space, with a mirror and your preferred divinatory tool on the altar to honor Istustaya. Dance clockwise around the circle, or your home, before attempting any divinatory effort. This draws the Goddess’s vision into your spirit.

If you want to try mirror descrying specifically to venerate Istustaya, sit somewhere comfortable with a candle behind the mirror. Dab a little sandalwood oil in the surface, rubbing it clockwise. Let your eyes un-focus and wait to see what images appear in the reflected light and oil. These may be symbolic or literal in nature. A dream interpretation guide may help in figuring out the meaning.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Goddess of The Sea” by xxstarslayerxx

All I could find on today’s Goddess states that “Istustaya [was one of] two Goddesses of destiny with Hattian origin in Hittite religion.

The task of Istustaya and Papaya is to spin the tread of life, especially the one of the king. They sit at the shores of the Black Sea. After Telipinu’s return they take part on the conference of gods.” [1]





Wikipedia, “Istustaya and Papaya“.


Suggested Links:

Bryce, Trevor. Life and Society in the Hittite World.

McMahon, Gregory; Gary M. Beckman; & Richard Henry Beal. Hittite Studies in Honor of Harry A. Hoffner, Jr.

Taracha, Piotr. Religions of Second Millennium Anatolia.

Wikipedia, “Istustaya and Papaya“.