“Tenga’s themes are balance, justice, morality and freedom. Her symbols are soil. Among the Mossi of Senegal, Tenga is a potent earth Goddess who presides over all matters of justice and morality. Today She joins our celebration by offering to right wrongs and restore the balance in any area of our life that’s gotten out of kilter.

Equal Opportunity Day commemorates Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address and the liberating energy it created for all people. Tenga had to be pleased by Mr. Lincoln’s efforts, and we should honor both him and this Goddess today by reconsidering any prejudices that cloud the way we look at other people or situations.

One way of doing this is through visualization. Hold a handful of soil as you mentally review the last week of your life and the way you handled certain individuals or circumstances. Consider: Did you go into a meeting with negativity, anticipating the worst? Did you overlook an opportunity, or close the door on a relationship because of a bad experience in the past?

These are the negative patterns that Tenga helps us to attack and transform with honest candidness (including being honest with yourself about shortcomings). You may not like what She shows you, but the results will be worth it.

Tenga improves your awareness of the Goddess in all things and all people.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Tenga is the Mossi Goddess of the earth. The Mossi people of West Africa believe that Tenga is not only responsible for the fertility of the land, but also for social order. She receives this authority from the dead who are buried in Her womb. Tenga is most often worshipped near old trees or springs, which both have roots deep within the earth. When a transgression has been committed, especially one which has caused blood to be shed on the earth, She must be appeased by sacrifice or She will withhold fertility from the land. Tenga’s name, which means ‘earth,’ is also seen as Napagha Tenga.” [1]

“Mother Nature” by Zonagirl

Now, to me, She bears a striking resemblance to the earth Goddess Asase Yaa of the Ashanti.





Sabrina. Goddess A Day, “Tenga“.


Suggested Links:

Everyculture.com, “Mossi“.

Everyculture.com, “Mossi – Religion and Expressive Culture“.

Kramarae, Cheris & Dale Spender. Routledge International Encyclopedia of Women: Global Women’s Issues and Knowledge, (p. 57).

MacK-Williams, Kibibi. Mossi, “Religion” (p. 36).

Skinner, Elliott Percival. The Mossi of the Upper Volta: The Political Development of the Sudanese People.