“Pukkeenegak” by Sharon Mcleod

“Pukkeenegak’s themes are kinship, community, thankfulness, charity and kindness. Her symbols are tattoos. This Inuit Goddess presides over all household and community affairs. As a mother figure, She watches kindly over Her children, making sure we have clothing and food. Art shows Her with a tattooed face, boots, and a lovely dress befitting the patroness of seamstresses.

Among the Inuit, this is a time when youths go door to door gathering foods for a huge community feast [referring to the Aiyaguk or Asking Festival].  Afterward, people petition one another for gifts – exchanging the entire community’s goods in the spirit of thanksgiving.  So, orchestrate a gathering of people of a like mind for a potluck dinner at which Pukkeenegak is the guest of honour (leave a place setting for her).

Wear special clothing today that reflects the Goddess’s gift with needle and thread. Or organize a clothing drive so people can donate items they no longer need to a charitable cause. This way the Goddess can bless each person who receives one of those garments with her providence!

If you’ve found your home or heart tense lately, invoke Pukkeenegak’s unifying, steadying energy by drawing an emblem of peace over your heart chakra or on the back of your hand (use non-toxic markers or body paint). Leave it there until it naturally wears off, by which time the magic should show signs of manifesting.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Tender Moments” by Dorothy Francis

All that I could find on today’s Goddess was that in Inuit mythology, Pukkeenegak (pronounced poo-KEE-neh-gack) was a domestic Goddess.  “The Inuit people worship Pukkeenegak as a hearth and home Goddess.  She rules all domestic tasks including sewing and cooking.  As a deity of childbirth, She rules all stages of pregnancy, including conception and labor” (Auset, p. 65); nothing more in-depth or any detailed mythological stories that I could find.




Auset, Brandi. The Goddess Guide: Exploring the Attributes and Correspondences of the Divine Feminine, “The Goddesses: Pukkeenegak“.


Suggested Links:

Freefictionbooks.org, “The Dance Festivals of the Alaskan Eskimo: The Aiyaguk or Asking Festival“.

Goddess-guide.com, “Fertility Goddesses and Goddesses of Pregnancy and Childbrith“.

Libraryoftheancients.proboards.com, “Eskimo Mythology“.

Monaghan, Patricia. Encyclopedia of Goddesses and Heroines,”Circumpolar” (p. 135 – 150).

Wozniak, Edward. Glitternight.com, “Inuit Mythology“.