* For today’s entry, Patricia Telesco names “Fons” as today’s Goddess. However, my research revealed that “Fontus or Fons (plural Fontes, ‘Font’ or ‘Source’) was a god of wells and springs. A religious festival called the Fontinalia was held on October 13 in his honor. Throughout the city, fountains and wellheads were adorned with garlands…Fons was the son of Juturna and Janus.” [1]

So, for today’s Goddess entry, I will basically be reblogging August 23’s entry on Fons’ mother, the Goddess Juturna.

“Elemental Goddess Water” by `AutumnsGoddess

“[Juturna’s] themes are water, wishes, thankfulness and healing. Her symbols are fountains and water sources.  This Roman Goddess of fountains holds a special place in today’s festivities, when people gather around Her son, Fons, in the spirit of community gratitude for the refreshment that Her son provides in all seasons.

The ancient Roman festival, Fontinalia, gives thanks for fresh drinking water, and many of its traditions are easily assimilated. For example, customarily, fresh flowers were tossed in flowing water sources to thank the spirit of [Juturna] that abides therein. So, float a flower atop a beverage today to honor [Juturna] as part of that drink.

[Juturna’s] waters are also known for healing, cleansing, and wish-granting. To generate well-being, include as many water-based foods and beverages in your diet today as possible. This allows you to partake of [Juturna’s] healing powers.  For wishes, give the Goddess a token (like a coin or flower petals) and whisper your desire to her waters.

For cleansing, take a hot bath or shower so Her waters will carry away your tensions.

Finally, you might want to focus on improving your water supply today. Buy a water filter, get some bottled water, bless your water jugs, or do something else along these lines so that [Juturna] can cleanse and purify everyone in your home.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Melusina” by *JinxMim

According to the Wikipedia, “Juturna was a Goddess of fountains, wells and springs. She was a sister of Turnus and supported him against Aeneas by giving him his sword after he dropped it in battle, as well as taking him away from the battle when it seemed he would get killed. She was also the mother of Fons by Janus.

Jupiter turned Her into a water nymph and gave Her a sacred well in LaviniumLatium, as well as another one near the temple to Vesta in the Forum Romanum. The pool next to the second well was called Lacus Juturnae. Juturna had an affair with Jupiter but the secret was betrayed by another nymph, Larunda, whom Jupiter struck with muteness as punishment.” [2]

The festival of Juturna was celebrated on January 11, the same day Carmentalia begins.

Art by Augustus Jules Bouvier

A thought on Fontinalia:  “At the end of the sultry summer season in ancient Rome, citizens celebrated Fontinalia, a tribute to Fontus, a water god, by decorating public fountains with garlands of flowers and throwing petals into the waters.  At a time when drought and water pollution threaten millions of people and multinational corporations are hatching plans to privatize water resources in the developing world, we too should be grateful for the gift of fresh water. Celebrate Fontinalia by finding ways to reduce your use of water, by lending a hand to environmental organizations fighting to provide access to clean water for everyone on the planet, and by planning a water-worship ritual of your own—perhaps sprinkling flowers into a nearby stream or lake.” (Walljsaper) [3]

Percentage of Population Without Reasonable Access to Safe Drinking Water





Wikipedia, “Fontus“.

Lonestar.texas.net, “Juturnalia“.

Walljasper, Jay. Utne.com, “Fontinalia“.

Wikipedia, “Juturna“.



Suggested Links:

Community-2.webtv.net, “Juturna: From Princess, to Water Nymph, to Goddess“.

Daly, Kathleen N. & Marian Rengel. Greek and Roman Mythology A to Z, “Juturna“.

Grammatici.narod.ru, “Roman Calendar – October“.

Lindemans, Micha F. Encyclopedia Mythica, “Juturna“.

Sabrina. Goddess A Day, “Juturna“.