“Haumea” by isa Marie

“Haumea’s themes are history, tradition, energy and restoration. Her symbols are leis, fresh flowers and Polynesian foodstuffs.  Hawaiian stories tell us that Haumea is the mother of Hawaii, having created it, the Hawaiian people, and all edible vegetation on these islands. Today She offers us renewed energy with which to restore or protect our traditions and rejoice in their beauty.

In Hawaii this marks the beginning of the Aloha Festival, a weeklong celebration of local custom and history complete with dances, parades, and sports competitions. For us this translates to reveling in our own local cultures, including foods, crafts, and the like. Hawumea lives in those customs and revels in your enjoyment of them.

If any historical site or tradition is slowly fading out due to ‘progress’, today also provides and excellent opportunity to try to draw some attention to that situation. Ask Haumea for Her help, then write letters to local officials, contact preservation or historical groups in that region, and see what you can do to keep that treasure alive.

For personal restoration or improved energy, I suggest eating some traditional Hawaiian foods today, as they are part of Haumea’s bounty and blessings. Have pineapple at breakfast, some macadamia nuts for a snack, and Kona coffee at work, and maybe even create a luau-style dinner for the family and friends to bless them too.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Haumea” by Kris Waldherr

“Originally, Hawaiian myth tells us, human women could not give birth.  They swelled with pregnancy and, when it was time for delivery, they were cut open – a dangerous procedure.  But the Goddess Haumea came to their rescue, teaching women how to push the child out between their legs.

Haumea was not so much ageless as ever-renewing.  Frequenctly She grew old, but as often She transformed Herself into a a young woman [much like Changing Woman/White Painted Woman or Estsanatlehi].  Generations went by and still She lived among humans, sleeping with the handsome young men even when they were Her grandchildren and dsitant descendants.  One of Her favored mates was named Wakea.  Once it was said, the people intended to sacrifice him.  Taking him to the forest, which was Her domain, Humea ran directly through the tree trunks, leaving shreds of Her shirts blooming as morning glory vines, and carried Her lover to safety.

Because She owned all the wild plants, Haumea could withdraw Her energy, leaving people to starve.  This She did when angry, but most often Haumea was a kindly Goddess.  Some say She is part of a trinity whose other aspects are the creator Hina and the fiery Pele” (Monaghan, p. 146).

“According to most accounts, She mated with the god Kane Milohai and gave birth to many children, including Hawaii’s most famous Goddess, Pele.  Thus, She is often referred to as the mother of the Hawaiian people as well as the Great Earth Mother.

Haumea was reported to be extremely skilled in childbirth. Because of that, children weren’t born of Her from mere traditional methods. Instead, they sprang from different parts of Her body. One Hawaiian legend claims that Pele was born from Her mother’s armpit, while another states that She came from a flame out of the Goddess’s mouth. Obviously, the second version makes more sense in light of Pele’s role as Goddess of the volcano.” [2]

Haumea’s other children included Kanemilohai, Kā-moho-aliʻi, Nāmakaokaha’i, Kapo and Hiʻiaka and was eventually killed by Kaulu.

Art by Susan Seddon Boulet

On 17 September 2008 the International Astronomical Union (IAU) announced it named the fifth known dwarf planet in the Solar System ‘Haumea‘ after the Hawaiian Goddess. The planet’s two moons were named after Haumea’s daughters: Hiʻiaka, after the Hawaiian Goddess said to have been born from the mouth of Haumea, and Namaka, after the water spirit said to have been born from Haumea’s body.” [3]





Kuchinsky, Charlotte. Voices.yahoo.com, “Discovering the Polynesian Goddess Haumea“.

Monaghan, Patricia. The New Book of Goddesses and Heroines, “Haumea”.

Wikipedia, “Haumea (mythology)“.



Suggested Links:


Sacred-texts.com, “XIX Haume“.