Archive for September 27, 2012


Full Harvest Moon – September

The Farmer’s Almanac tells us that this full moon’s name is attributed to Native Americans because it marked when corn was supposed to be harvested. Most often, the September full moon is actually the Harvest Moon, which is the full Moon that occurs closest to the autumn equinox. In two years out of three, the Harvest Moon comes in September, but in some years it occurs in October. At the peak of harvest, farmers can work late into the night by the light of this Moon. Usually the full moon rises an average of 50 minutes later each night, but for the few nights around the Harvest Moon, the Moon seems to rise at nearly the same time each night: just 25 to 30 minutes later across the U.S., and only 10 to 20 minutes later for much of Canada and Europe. Corn, pumpkins, squash, beans, and wild rice the chief Indian staples are now ready for gathering.

September Moon is also known as Harvest Moon, Barley Moon. The harvesters would gain extra time in the fields by the light of the harvest moon. This is a time of organizing and preparing for the coming months. The zodiac association is Virgo. [1]

“Harvest Moon Painting” by Samuel Palmer

SEPTEMBER: Harvest Moon (September) Also known as: Wine Moon, Singing Moon, Sturgeon Moon, Haligmonath (Holy Month), Witumanoth (Wood Month), Moon When Deer Paw the Earth
Nature Spirits: trooping faeries
Herbs: copal, fennel, rye, wheat, valerian, skullcap
Colors: brown, yellow-green, yellow
Flowers: narcissus, lily
Scents: storax, mastic, gardenia, bergamont
Stones: peridot, olivine, chrysolite, citrine
Trees: hazel, larch, bay
Animals: snake, jackal
Birds: ibis, sparrow
Deities: Demeter, Ceres, Isis, Nephthys, Freyja, Thoth
Power Flow: rest after labor; balance of Light and Dark. Organize. Clean and straighten up physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual clutter. [2]

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

The Celtic Lady. The Olde Way, “Individual Moons Explained“.

Farmers’ Almanac, “Full Moon Names and Their Meanings“.

Willow Grove, “The Witch’s Esbats“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

The Fine-Arts and Bluesband & Poetry Press, “The Names of the Moons“.

National Geographic, “Full Moons: What’s In A Name?

The Old Farmer’s Almanac, “Full Corn Moon” .

What-Your-Sign.com, “Symbolic Native American Full Moon Names“.

* Check out Mooncircles.com every month, or better yet, subscribe to their monthly newsletter to get the scoop on each month’s Full and New Moons, find out more about Moon Astrology  and read blogs.  They even have a different 3-Minute Moon Ritual for each Full Moon! 

I really wanted to share this here with you as we think about and meditate on the Autumn season, finding balance and get ready for the coming winter.  This comes from today’s DailyOm, entitled “Seasons of Beauty”.

As we cultivate our life, our beauty becomes as much about what we are creating and doing as it is about our appearance.


We tend to associate youth with beauty, but the truth is that beauty transcends every age. Just as a deciduous tree is stunning in all its stages—from its full leafy green in the summer to its naked skeleton during winter and everything in between—human beings are beautiful throughout their life spans.

The early years of our lives tend to be about learning and experiencing as much as we possibly can. We move through the world like sponges, absorbing the ideas of other people and the world. Like a tree in spring, we are waking up to the world. In this youthful phase of life, our physical strength, youth, and beauty help open doors and attract attention. Gradually, we begin to use the information we have gathered to form ideas and opinions of our own. As we cultivate our philosophy about life, our beauty becomes as much about what we are saying, doing, and creating as it is about our appearance. Like a tree in summer, we become full, expressive, beautiful, and productive.


When the time comes for us to let go of the creations of our middle lives, we are like a tree in autumn dropping leaves, as we release our past attachments and preparing for a new phase of growth. The children move on, and careers shift or end. The lines on our faces, the stretch marks, and the grey hairs are beautiful testaments to the fullness of our experience. In the winter of our lives, we become stripped down to our essence like a tree. We may become more radiant than ever at this stage, because our inner light shines brighter through our eyes as time passes. Beauty at this age comes from the very core of our being—our essence. This essence is a reminder that there is nothing to fear in growing older and that there is a kind of beauty that comes only after one has spent many years on earth.

 

I also came across this beautiful and inspirational video today from the Tuatha de Brighid Flamekeepers group I belong to.  Learning to Dance in the Rain Movie.  Enjoy!

 

Source:

~ Dailyom.com, “Seasons of Beauty“.

“Haumea” by isa Marie

“Haumea’s themes are history, tradition, energy and restoration. Her symbols are leis, fresh flowers and Polynesian foodstuffs.  Hawaiian stories tell us that Haumea is the mother of Hawaii, having created it, the Hawaiian people, and all edible vegetation on these islands. Today She offers us renewed energy with which to restore or protect our traditions and rejoice in their beauty.

In Hawaii this marks the beginning of the Aloha Festival, a weeklong celebration of local custom and history complete with dances, parades, and sports competitions. For us this translates to reveling in our own local cultures, including foods, crafts, and the like. Hawumea lives in those customs and revels in your enjoyment of them.

If any historical site or tradition is slowly fading out due to ‘progress’, today also provides and excellent opportunity to try to draw some attention to that situation. Ask Haumea for Her help, then write letters to local officials, contact preservation or historical groups in that region, and see what you can do to keep that treasure alive.

For personal restoration or improved energy, I suggest eating some traditional Hawaiian foods today, as they are part of Haumea’s bounty and blessings. Have pineapple at breakfast, some macadamia nuts for a snack, and Kona coffee at work, and maybe even create a luau-style dinner for the family and friends to bless them too.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Haumea” by Kris Waldherr

“Originally, Hawaiian myth tells us, human women could not give birth.  They swelled with pregnancy and, when it was time for delivery, they were cut open – a dangerous procedure.  But the Goddess Haumea came to their rescue, teaching women how to push the child out between their legs.

Haumea was not so much ageless as ever-renewing.  Frequenctly She grew old, but as often She transformed Herself into a a young woman [much like Changing Woman/White Painted Woman or Estsanatlehi].  Generations went by and still She lived among humans, sleeping with the handsome young men even when they were Her grandchildren and dsitant descendants.  One of Her favored mates was named Wakea.  Once it was said, the people intended to sacrifice him.  Taking him to the forest, which was Her domain, Humea ran directly through the tree trunks, leaving shreds of Her shirts blooming as morning glory vines, and carried Her lover to safety.

Because She owned all the wild plants, Haumea could withdraw Her energy, leaving people to starve.  This She did when angry, but most often Haumea was a kindly Goddess.  Some say She is part of a trinity whose other aspects are the creator Hina and the fiery Pele” (Monaghan, p. 146).

“According to most accounts, She mated with the god Kane Milohai and gave birth to many children, including Hawaii’s most famous Goddess, Pele.  Thus, She is often referred to as the mother of the Hawaiian people as well as the Great Earth Mother.

Haumea was reported to be extremely skilled in childbirth. Because of that, children weren’t born of Her from mere traditional methods. Instead, they sprang from different parts of Her body. One Hawaiian legend claims that Pele was born from Her mother’s armpit, while another states that She came from a flame out of the Goddess’s mouth. Obviously, the second version makes more sense in light of Pele’s role as Goddess of the volcano.” [2]

Haumea’s other children included Kanemilohai, Kā-moho-aliʻi, Nāmakaokaha’i, Kapo and Hiʻiaka and was eventually killed by Kaulu.

Art by Susan Seddon Boulet

On 17 September 2008 the International Astronomical Union (IAU) announced it named the fifth known dwarf planet in the Solar System ‘Haumea‘ after the Hawaiian Goddess. The planet’s two moons were named after Haumea’s daughters: Hiʻiaka, after the Hawaiian Goddess said to have been born from the mouth of Haumea, and Namaka, after the water spirit said to have been born from Haumea’s body.” [3]

 

 

 

Sources:

Kuchinsky, Charlotte. Voices.yahoo.com, “Discovering the Polynesian Goddess Haumea“.

Monaghan, Patricia. The New Book of Goddesses and Heroines, “Haumea”.

Wikipedia, “Haumea (mythology)“.

 

 

Suggested Links:

Powersthatbe.com, “ANCIENT HAWAIIN GODDESS HAUMEA“.

Sacred-texts.com, “XIX Haume“.

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