“The Sphinx’s themes are the harvest, protection, water, beginnings and fertility. Her symbols are water, sand and pyramids.  This Goddess is the Egyptian guardian of the Pyramids, but also has other important duties. She signals the beginning of the Nile’s fertile flooding, the water which replenishes the soil at this time of year. This abundance, productivity and protection is what the Sphinx offers us in preparation for Autumn’s harvest.The Egyptian New Year is celebrated in September to correspond with the annual flood cycle of the Nile and to mark a new planting season. The Sphinx joins in this celebration by producing plenty wherever it’s needed.

To encourage this further, find a pyramid-shaped object (like a fluorite crystal) and place a symbol of your need beneath it (like a dollar for money). This puts your goal beneath the Sphinx’s watchful eye so She can attend to that matter diligently.

If you hold any type of ritual today, use sand to mark the magic circle, along with this invocation to the Goddess (you can change the words boldfaced here to reflect more personal requirements:

‘Great watcher, Lady of the Pyramids, I sprinkle your sands to the wind –
Let the magic begin.
Sand to the east for abundant hope;
sand to the south for fiery energy;
sand to the west for flowing love;
sand to the north for firm foundations;
and sand in the center to bind the powers together. So be it.'”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Sphinx” by Hrana Janto

The ‘strangler’ started Her life in Egypt, where the lion-bodied monster had a bearded male head and represented royalty.  But in Greece – in a city with the  Egyptian name Thebes – the Sphinx became female.  She was said to have been a Maenad who grew so wild in Her intoxicated worship that She became monstrous: snake, lion, and woman combined.

The guardian of Thebes, She prevented travelers from passing by strangling them if they could not answer a mysterious riddle.  (Possibly She descended from the underworld guardian Goddess who, in many cultures, prevented the passage of the living into death’s territory.)  What, the Sphinx would ask, walked on four legs in the morning, two at noon, and three in the evening?  Finally one traveler, who would become King Oedipus of Thebes, answered Her: Human beings, who crawl as children, walk upright as adults, and rely on canes in age.  Her reason for existance having been destroyed, the Sphinx destroyed Herself” (Monaghan, p. 285).




Monaghan, Patricia. The New Book of Goddesses and Heroines, “Sphinx”.


Suggested Links:

All-about-egypt.com, “Sphinx Facts“.

Hadingham, Evan. Smithsonianmag.com, “Uncovering Secrets of the Sphinx“.

Mydailygoddess.blogspot.com, “Sphinx: Challenge“.

Theoi.com, “Sphinx“.

Wikipedia, “Sphinx“.