“Temazcalteci’s themes are health and banishing (sickness). Her symbols are medicinal herbs, health and healing amulets and water.  This Aztec Goddess’s name means ‘grandmother of the sweet bath’. It is She who teaches us how to use medicinal herbs to maintain our health or banish sickness as fall sets in (perhaps especially in teas, considering Her name).

Follow the Mexican custom and rise at dawn, the time of renewed hope. Enjoy a hot cup of soothing, healthful tea to get your entire day off with Temazcalteci’s energy for well-being.

Burning incense today is said to attract the Goddess’s favor and bring health and protection from fall maladies. Burn sage or cedar in every room, and wash your bedding or favorite clothing in sage tincture. This not only attracts the Goddess’s blessing, but also decreases germs.

Dancing is another activity that promotes well-being today. Maybe try out a dance aerobics tape, and if you like it, stick with it! Boogie with the Goddess every morning.

Don’t forget to smudge your car with some healthful aromatics, too (like wintergreen or apple). Then drive over to the nearest health cooperative and get some good herbal supplements to add to your diet. This way you generate Temazcalteci’s magic every day just by remembering to take the vitamin!”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Curandera de la Madre Tierra” by Ricardo Ortega

Temazcalteci is an Aztec Goddess; Her name means ‘Grandmother of the Sweet Bath’. She is the Aztec Goddess of cleanliness who keeps demon spirits away from bathers.  According to Sahagún, this Goddess was the Goddess of medicine, Toci, She was venerated by doctors.  She was the patroness of healers, midwives, soothsayers, sorcerers, and witches who teaches us how to use medicinal herbs in order to maintain our health or to banish illness as summer turns into autumn.  She was also worshipped by those who had temazcals (baths) in their houses.” [1] [2]

Traditional construction of a Temazcal

“Temazcalli is the Aztec word for sweat house, and sweat houses were thought of as some kind of artificial womb where sick people would crawl in and be ‘reborn’ on the way out fit and healthy.

Illness was thought of as some dastardly demons work and though husbands and wives would fan each other to waft away the badness you really need a Goddess present to smack the demons up – and that was Temazcalteci’s job.” [3]

“In the Aztec tradition there is a song titled ‘Teteo Innan, Temazcalteci’ – Our Grandmother, the Grandmother Sweat Lodge. The song speaks to ‘Our Grandmother’ as the heart of the Earth,  and the Tree of Life whose flowers bloom in the four colors that represent the four directions of the Universe.

Her followers made this Goddess a feast every year, buying a woman for a sacrifice and decorating her with the ornaments proper to the Goddess.  All during the evening they danced with and regaled her delicately, praying her to eat as they would a great lady, and amusing her in every way that she might not weep nor be sad at the prospect of death.” [4]


On occassion, She was identified as Cihuacoatl or Tlazolteotl. [5]





GodsLaidBare.com, “Temazcalteci“.

Mythologydictionary.com, “Temazcalteci“.

Stella. Goddesses-and-gods.blogspot.com, “Temazcalteci Aztec Goddess of Cleanliness“.

Wikipedia, “Temazcalteci“.



Suggested Links:

Godchecker.com, “Temazcalteci“.

Gracesesma.com, “Temazcalli“.

Gary, Louis H., George Foot Moore & John Arnott MacCulloch. The Mythology of All Races.

Oaxacainfo.com, “Temazcal“.