“Fire Goddess” by WoodpeckerArt

“Auge – Her themes are fire and fertility. Her symbols are the hearth, fire, stoves and cooking utensils.  This Spanish Goddess of heat and fertility helps us celebrate today’s festivities, Saint Lawrence Day, by providing our cooking fire! Auge also inspires the warmth of passion so that fertility will flow in the relationship and on a physical level if desired.

In an odd turn of events, the same saint, St. Lawrence, who was roasted alive because of his with became the patron saint of the kitchen and cookery in Spain and Italy. In keeping with this theme, prepare grilled or roasted food today, invoking Auge simply by lighting the flames!

If weather permits, have a fire festival in your yard over the barbecue or hibachi and bless your cooking utensils by placing them momentarily in the flames. As you do, add an incantation like this one:

‘By the forge, by the fire, Auge build the power higher.
Within these tools let there be an abundance of fertility!’

Use the tools outside or in your kitchen whenever you need extra productivity. Should the weather not cooperate, this spell works perfectly on a gas stove, which gives off a flame in which Auge can dwell.

Finally, wear red or orange hues today (the colors of fire), and remember to light a candle to honor this Goddess. Consider dabbing on some fiery aromas, too, like mint, orange or ginger for a little extra energy and affection.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

I could find no information on a Spanish Goddess named Auge for today’s entry.  I did find information however on an Arcadian princess named Auge, mother of the hero Telephus.

“Vestal” by fb101

In Greek mythology, Auge, a daughter of Aleus and Neaera and priestess of Athena Alea at Tegea, bore the hero Telephus to Heracles [in one account found in Sacred-Texts.com, it states that, “But when Hercules dwelt as a guest in the sanctuary of Athena, on his expedition against Augeas, he saw the maiden, and while intoxicated, he raped her.”]. Her father had been told by an oracle that he would be overthrown by his grandson.  [Auge] secreted the baby in the temple of Athena.” [1]

Now, according to Theoi Greek Mythology, “[Auge]…birthed her illegitimate son within the sacred precincts of [Athena]. As punishment for the sacriligeous act, Athena made the land barren until the king had the girl exiled and sold into slavery.” [2]

“Artemis and Callisto” by Sebastiano Ricci

Here, yet again, I am disappointed by the Goddesses in Greek mythology.  One such example that deeply disappoints me is the story of the nymph Callisto, one of Artemis’ devotees and companions, who was raped by Zeus (disguised as Artemis).  Callisto became pregnant as a result of the rape and when Artemis found out that Callisto had “broken” her vow of virginity, given away by her growing belly, Artemis banished her from the fold.  Then Hera gets in on the action and exacts revenge by grabbing Callisto by the hair, throwing her down and turning her into a bear shortly after giving birth. [3]  How is it that the victim gets the blame and is victimized not once, not twice, but three times??  To me, examples like these are infuriating and this is part of the reason why it is very hard for me to connect with the Goddesses of the Greek and Roman pantheons; or should I say the Goddesses of the patriarchal Hellenic Greek (influenced by the Ionians, the Achaeans and the Dorians who downgraded Them) and Roman pantheons as I have a great deal of reverence and respect for Their original pre-Hellenic, Minoan and Etruscan forms.  But anyways, back to our story…

“[Auge] had secreted her baby in the temple of Athena.  A scarcity of grain [apparently caused by Athena] alerted Aleus that there was a profanation of the temple, and he discovered the child.

In one version the baby was exposed on Mount Parthenion above Tegea, where Telephus was suckled by a deer.

Hercules and the Infant Telephus, Artist Unknown, c. 50 A.D., Italy

In another Auge was given to Nauplius (‘sailor’) who was to kill her, but who, taking pity, brought her to Teuthras, a king in Mysia, in Asia Minor. Alternatively, Auge and Telephus were put in a crate and set adrift on the sea. They washed up in Mysia, where Telephus later appeared in his wanderings; mother and son were about to consummate their marriage when they were parted by a thunderbolt.

Offering to Athena statue
Telephos frieze on The Great Altar at Pergamum.

In the time of Pausanias (2nd century CE), the tomb of Auge was still shown at Pergamon, where the Attalids venerated Telephus as a founding hero.  In the Telephus frieze on the Great Altar of Pergamon, Auge appears in a subsidiary role.” [4]

mountain goddess lydia

Now, I also found that Auge was the name of one of the twelve Horai meaning “Daybreak” (augê). [5]

In conclusion for today’s entry, I could find no connection between the Goddess Auge that Telesco describes as today’s Goddess and the Arcadian princess Auge, or the Auge of the Horae for that matter.  If anyone has any further information they’d like to share on the Spanish Auge or point me in another direction, I’d be sincerely grateful!





Lee, Melissa. Encyclopedia Mythica, “Callisto“.

Sacred-Texts.com, “Telephus“.

Theoi Greek Mythology, “Athena Wrath“.

Theoi Greek Mythology, “Horai“.



Suggested Links:

Baur, Paul Victor Christopher. Eileithyia.

Hellenica World, “Horae“.

Jones, Christopher Prestige. Kinship Diplomacy in the Ancient World.