“Turning” by Jia Lu

“Fuchi’s themes are inspiration, courage, safety (protection), fire (ancient), skill (sports) and relationships. Her symbols are mountains and fire.  This Goddess gave Her name to the sacred volcano Fujiyama. As a fire Goddess, She rules natural energy (heat) sources and also those generated in our heaths, homes and hearts. This energy, along with summer’s sun, joins together in our life today, generating strength, endurance, keen vision and relationships with genuine warmth.

July and August mark the climbing season at Mount Fuji. For most people, attempting this is a pilgrimage of sorts dedicated to ‘climbing the mountain because it’s there.’ On a deeper level, however, the mountain houses the deities of Shinto tradition, challenging all who who dare visit to stretch their limits and do their very best. While most of us can’t go to Japan to visit the Goddess in Her abode, we can climb stairs to help us reconnect with Fuchi’s uplifting powers. Today, instead of using elevators, climb stairs whenever and wherever possible. As you do, visualize the area(s) in your life that could use a boost from Fuchi’s energy, those areas that really challenge you somehow, or those where emotional warmth seems lacking. When you reach the top, claim your reward with some type of affirmation (such as I am strong, I am loving), and then act on this change with conviction!”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Pele Rising” by Jim Warren


Patricia Monaghan refers to Her as Fuji.  She states that “on all continents, people have seen volcanoes as female forces, hailed them as Goddesses: Aetna in Italy, Pele in Hawaii, and Chuginadak in the Aleutians are among the many female divinities of earthly fire.  The aborigional Japanese Ainus, too, saw volcanic fire as female, naming their chief divinity Fuji, Goddess of the famous mountain that bears Her name.

Now the highest mountain in Japan, Fuji was once almost the same height as nearby Mt. Hakusan, wherein a god lived.  A dispute arose about which was, in fact, the higher mountain, and the Amida Buddha invented an ingenious way to measure: he connected the two peaks with a long pipe and poured water in one end.  Alas for the proud Goddess, the water fell on Her head.  Her humiliation didn’t last long, however.  Fuji forthwith struck Mt. Hakusan eight blows, creating the eight peaks of today’s mountain” (p. 129).




Monaghan, Patricia. The New Book of Goddesses and Heroines, “Fuji”.


Suggested Links:

Batchelor, John. The Ainu of Japan.

Her Cyclopedia, “Fuji“.

Inanna.virtualave.net, “Far East Realm  – Fuji“.

Roberts, Jeremy. Japanese Mythology A to Z, “Fuchi (Huchi)“.

Sacred Destination, “Mount Fuji, Japan“.

Tate, Karen. Sacred Places of the Goddess: 108 Destinations, “Goddess Focus: Ainu & the Fire Goddess“.