“Corn Mother” by Marjett Schille

“Corn Mother’s themes are abundance, children, energy, fertility, harvest, health, grounding, providence and strength. Her symbols are corn and corn sheafs.  Literally the spirit of the corn in Native American traditions, Corn Mother brings with her the bounty of earth, its healing capabilities, its nurturing nature and its providence. This is the season when Corn Mother really shines, bountiful with the harvest. She is happy to share of this bounty and give all those who seek Her an appreciation of self, a healthy does of practicality and a measure of good common sense.

Around this time of year, the Seminole Native Americans (in the Florida area) dance the green corn dance to welcome the crop and ensure ongoing fertility in the fields and tribe. This also marks the beginning of the Seminole year. So, if you enjoy dancing, grab a partner and dance! Or, perhaps do some dance aerobics. As you do, breathe deeply and release your stress into Corn Mother’s keeping. She will turn it into something positive, just as the land takes waste and makes it into beauty.

Using corn in rituals and spells is perfectly fitting fort this occasion. Scatter cornmeal around the sacred space to mark your magic circle or scatter it to the wind so Corn Mother can bring fertility back to you. Keeping a dried ear of corn in the house invokes Corn Mother’s protection and luck and consuming corn internalizes her blessings.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Corn Mother, also called Corn Maiden ,  mythological figure believed, among indigenous agricultural tribes in North America, to be responsible for the origin of corn (maize). The story of the Corn Mother is related in two main versions with many variations.

In the first version (the ‘immolation version’), the Corn Mother is depicted as an old woman who succors a hungry tribe, frequently adopting an orphan as a foster child. She secretly produces grains of corn by rubbing Her body. When Her secret is discovered, the people, disgusted by Her means of producing the food, accuse Her of witchcraft. Before being killed—by some accounts with Her consent—She gives careful instructions on how to treat Her corpse. Corn sprouts from the places over which Her body is dragged or, by other accounts, from Her corpse or burial site.

“Corn Maiden” by Marti Fenton (White Deer Song)

In the second version (the ‘flight version’), She is depicted as a young, beautiful woman who marries a man whose tribe is suffering from hunger. She secretly produces corn, also, in this version, by means that are considered to be disgusting; She is discovered and insulted by Her in-laws. Fleeing the tribe, She returns to Her divine home; Her husband follows Her, and She gives him seed corn and detailed instructions for its cultivation.

Similar Native American traditions of the immolation of a maternal figure or the insult to and flight of a beautiful maiden are told to account for the origin of the buffalo, peyote, certain medicinal herbs, and the sacred pipe.” [1]

“Lammas” by Wendy Andrew

“Corn Mother is also known as Corn Woman, Corn Maiden and Yellow Woman. A variety of versions of this Goddess show up in a variety of cultures around the World, including Europe, Egypt, India and the America’s. Some of the more well known Goddesses are said to be Corn Mother’s, including the Celtic Cerridwen, the Egyptian Isis and the Greek Demeter.

The Corn Mother is the nourishment aspect of the Goddess and is most commonly associated with grain harvest. She is the Mother Goddess who nurtures those around Her with food and is the conceptual representation of ‘what we will reap we will sow’.” [2]


Britannica Online Encyclopedia, “Corn Mother“.

Goddessrealm.com, “Corn Mother Goddess of Nourishment“.



Suggested Links:

Cornmother.com, “The Corn Mother“.

First People – the Legends, “Corn Mother – Penobscot“.

Goddesses and Gods, “Goddess Corn Mother“.

Hrana Janto, Illustration & Illumination, “Corn Maiden“.

Return of the Corn Mothers

Sidhe, Fiana. Matrifocus, “Goddess in the Wheel of the Year – The Corn Mother“.

Tanith. Order of the White Moon, “Corn Woman, Goddess of Nourishment“.

Two Worlds, Waynonaha. Weed Wanderings, “Wise Woman Wisdom…Corn Woman“.