“Sun Goddess” by Cadgraphics

“Shakuru’s themes are theft, divination, the sun, truth and magic. Her symbols are the sun and gold/yellow items.  Pawnee daughter of the moon and Goddess of the sun, Shakuru joins summer celebrations by shining Her light on today’s ceremony, the Sun Dance. In Pawnee stories, Shakuru’s son became the first man on earth, making Her the mother of humankind.

About this time of year, the Plains Native Americans gather to welcome the sun and all it’s power. All manner of magical practices take place during this rite, including divinations to uncover a thief or murderer using totemic practices. For our purposes this might translate into divining for a totem animal whom we call on for guidance and energy in times of need. To do this, you’ll need a lot of animal pictures (cut from magazines or anywhere else you can find them). Make the images the same shape and size to ensure randomness. Sit quietly with these face-down before you ask Shakuru to guide you hand. Don’t move quickly, and wait until the paper below your hand feels warm, a sign of Shakuru’s presence. Turn it over and see what animal it is, then read up on that creature in folklore collections to see what message it’s bringing you.

As much as possible, try to move clockwise today (imitating the natural movement of the sun through the sky). Walk through your house going to the right, stir your coffee clockwise, clean windows using clockwise strokes and so forth. This honors Shakuru and draws the sun’s blessings into your life.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Unelanuhi” by Susan Seddon Boulet

In Pawnee mythology, the solar and lunar deities were Shakuru and Pah, respectively. Both Shakuru and Pah were created by the supreme Creator god, Tirawa (also called Atius Tirawa). Tirawa was believed to have taught the Pawnee people tattooing, fire-building, hunting, agriculture, speech and clothing, religious rituals (including the use of tobacco and sacred bundles), and sacrifices. He was associated with most natural phenomena, including stars and planets, wind, lightning, rain, and thunder. The wife of Tirawa was Atira, Goddess of the Earth. Atira was associated with corn.

Four major stars were said to represent gods and were part of the Creation story, in which the first human being was a woman. The Pawnee believed that the first woman was born of the Morning Star and Evening Star and the first man from the marriage of the Sun and Moon (Shakuru and Pah).  Legend tells that the first woman and the son of Shakuru then created the Pawnee people.

Archeologists and anthropologists have determined the Pawnee had a sophisticated understanding of the movement of stars. They noted the nonconforming movements of both Venus (Evening Star) and Mars (Morning Star). The Pawnee centered all aspects of daily life on this celestial observation, including the important cultivation cycle for sacred corn. [1]


Genyuk, Julia. Windows2universe.org, “Tirawa“.

Sabrina. Goddess A Day, “Shakuru“.

Wikipedia, “Pawnee Mythology“.


Suggested Links:

Native-languages.org, “Native Languages of the Americas: Pawnee Legends and Traditional Stories“.

Wikipedia, “Pawnee People“.