“Incan Goddess” by Margaret Girle

“Chasca’s themes are the sun, fire, divination and love. Her symbols are the sun, fire and flowers. In Incan tradition, this Goddess created the dawn and twilight, the gentlest aspects of the sun. Along with Her consort, the sun god Inti, She uses light to draw sprouts from the ground and inspire blossoms. Her rapport with Inti and Her tender nature give Chasca associations with love. According to lore, She communicates to people through clouds and dew in a type of geomantic observation.

In the ancient Peruvian Incan Festival of the Sun, Incans reveled in Chasca’s and Inti’s power and beauty around this time when the sun reached its zenith. People made offerings to the Goddess and god, followed by folk dances around ritual fires. So, if you can hold an outdoor ritual today, build a fire and dance come dusk. Allow Chasca’s inspiring, growth-oriented energy to fill you to overflowing.

Incans also burned old clothing in ritual fire to banish sickness and bad luck. Try this, or burn an emblem of your troubles instead. As the token is consumed, Chasca transforms the negative energy into something positive.

If you’re fortunate to have a semicloudy day, go outside and ask a question of Chasca (ideally about relationships). Then watch for an answer in some form. For example, a heart would indicate that love is on its way!”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Among the Inca of Peru, Chasca was honored as the Goddess of the Dawn and Twilight.  She was honored as the gentle aspects of the rising sun and setting sun.  She is described as the beautiful wavy haired maiden, and as a servant of the sun, it is Her light that enables flowers and plants to grow and thrive.  According to Incan mythology, it was She who controlled the weather and the protectors of the virgins and young girls.  Chasca has been linked to the planet Venus; hence Her other name, ‘The Long-Haired Star (Venus)'”

She was the author of the flowers who used Her light to draw sprouts from the ground and inspire blossoms, and according to lore, She communicates with Her people through clouds and, as the Mistress of the Morning, the dew She casts upon the ground.” [1]

On a personal note, I find it EXTREMELY interesting that a Goddess, half way around the world from Inanna, Ishtar or Aphrodite, a Goddess of love no less, is also associated with Venus – the Morning and Evening Star…that just amazes me🙂






Goddesses and Gods,Goddess Chasca“.



Suggested Links:

Goddess-guide.com, “Inka Goddesses“.

Wikipedia, “Inca Mythology“.