“Nu Kua” by Susanne Iles

“Nugua’s themes are balance, masculinity, femininity, cooperation and equality. Her symbols are the Yin-Yang symbol and opposites.  In China, Nugua is know as ‘she who restores balance.’ Nugun’s energy brings life back into equilibrium when circumstances may have threatened us with chaos. In art She is depicted as being part rainbow-colored dragon and part woman, representing the importance of maintaining balance between the lower and the higher self.

Around this time of year, when the daylight and nighttime hours are growing closer to equal, the Chinese hold a dragon-boat festival that revels in Nugua’s balance-the masculine (yin) and feminine (yang), the light and the dark and the cooperative energies that dance between the tow. To commemorate this yourself, be sure to carry a coin with you (the heads/tails represents duality), but keep it where you won’t accidentally spend it. Bless it saying,

‘By day and dark, Nugua’s balance impart.’

If negativity threatens your sense of stability, follow Chinese custom and drum out the evil. Use anything that has a drum-like sound, move counterclockwise, the direction of banishing and visualize Nugua’s rainbow filling every inch of your home.

Offering beans, peachers and rice are also customary. So, either leave these in a special spot or eat them to internaoze any of Nuguga’s attributes you need today.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Nu-Gua” by ~nuu

Today’s entry is another name for a Goddess that was previously researched back on February 13, Nu Kua.  Instead of reblogging that entry, I will cite what Patricia Monaghan says about Nu Kua.

“The creator Goddess of ancient China made the first human being from yellow clay.  At first, She carefully molded them.  At length, finding this too tedious, Nu Kua just dipped a rope into slip-like clay and shook it to so drops splattered onto the ground.  Thus were two types of beings born: from molded figures, nobles; from the clay drops, peasants.

Later this serpent-bodied Goddess quelled a rebellion against the heavenly order and, when the dying rebel chief shook heaven’s pillars out of alignment, She restored order by melting multi-colored stones to rebuild the blue sky.  Finding other problems on earth, Nu Kua set about correcting them: She cut off the toes of a giant tortoise and used them to mark the compass’ points; She burned reeds into ashes, using them to dam the flooding rivers.  She also concerned Herself with the chaos of human relations, and established rites of marriage so that children would be raised well.  Order restored, Nu Kua retreated to the distant sky – Her domain and Her attribute” (p. 233 – 234).


Monaghan, Patricia. The New Book of Goddesses and Heroines, “Nu Kua”.

Suggested Links:

Ferrebeekeeper, “Nüwa, the Serpent Goddess“.

Iles, Susanne. Susanneiles.com, “The Dragon & Creation: Reclaiming the Sacred“.

MXTODIS123. An Inner Journey: The Moon, Mythology, and You, “Nu-kua, the Goddess of Creation.”

Squidoo, “Nu Kua, Dragon Goddess of Love“.

Took, Thalia. A-Muse-ing Grace Gallery, “Nu Kua“.

Wikipedia, “Nüwa“.

Wu, Helen. Chinesestoryonline.com, “Chinese Were Created by a Goddess – Nuwa“.