"Water Bender" by kattnboys

“Ahurani’s themes are luck, health, longevity, harvest and fertility.  Her symbol is water.  Persians invoked Ahurani for prosperity, growth, fertility and insight through water libations, and we can do likewise. Her companion, Ahura Mazda, is the Lord of Wisdom and helps us distinguish good from evil.

People in Iran welcome the new year over thirteen days around the spring equinox with festivities similar to those of many other cultures, including rituals for portents, luck, health and long life. Rain today indicates Ahurani’s pleasure and thus a good harvest. Eating sweet wheat breads or a nut compote today brings Ahurani’s fortune and fertility. It is also very important to go outside today; otherwise, all bad luck stays within the house!

Quaff a full glass of fresh, clean water today to internalize any of Ahurani’s attributes you need. Keep your mind strongly focused on your goal as you drink. To improve this little spell, dye the water with coloring to match the magic. Use green for growth, abundance and fertility, or blue for wisdom. In keeping with Iranian custom, give a little of this water to the earth as you invoke Ahurani’s blessings.

Wear water-toned clothing today (blues and purples) to help you flow easily through the day and to accent Ahurani’s energy.

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Ahurani is a water Goddess from ancient Persian mythology. She watches over rainfall as well as standing water. She was invoked for health, healing, prosperity, and growth. She is either the wife or the daughter of the great god of creation and goodness, Ahura Mazda. Her name means ‘She who belongs to Ahura’.” [1]

"Goddess" by BrokenFayth

“Ahurani  represents the water in all appearances: lakes, sources, rivers, snow, and rain. She was also the divine symbol of both health and prosperity.   She watches over the sea and other waters and brings health, fertility, offspring, peace, wealth, and fame to all those who honor Her.

The people prayed to Ahurani for health, healing, prosperity and growth.  All water is Her home.  It is said that She brings prosperity to the land and helps women to get pregnant.  Water libations were a key part of any rituals to this Goddess.” [2]

“Ahurani was another name for the Goddess Anahita (Nahid in modern Persian), a water Goddess whose name means ‘unstained, clean and innocent’.” [3]

“Ahurani is the Avestan language name of a Zoroastrian (class of) divinity associated with “the waters” (āpō).  In scripture, the expression ahurani appears both in the singular and in the plural, and may – subject to context – either denote a specific divinity named Ahurani, or a class of divinities that are ahuranis.The Avestan feminine suffix -ani denotes “companion, wife, mate”, hence ahurani means “partner of ahura.” The ahura of the name may or may not be a reference to Ahura Mazda or to the other Ahuras. Following recent scholarship, it is now generally supposed that there was once been a divinity whose proper name was *Ahura, and from whom the various ahuras of the Avesta receive this epithet.Ahurani(s) are not included in any list of yazatas, nor do they/does She have a day-name dedication in the Zoroastrian calendar. This may be because in later Zoroastrianism Aredvi Sura Anahita dominates as divinity of the waters, and it is to Her that the hymn to the waters (the Aban Yasht) is dedicated.There appear to be historic parallels between the Avestan ahuranis and the RigVedic varunanis, the “wives of Varuna.” These parallels are one of the points of comparison for the theory that Ahura Mazda and Varuna both descend from a common predecessor (see Ahura Mazda for details).” [4]


Denton, Justin. Encyclopedia Mythica, “Ahurani“.

An Inner Journey: The Moon, Mythology, and You, “Ahurani“.

Iran Politics Club, “Persian Mythology, Gods and Goddesses: Part Two

Wikipedia, “Ahurani“.


Suggested Links:

Avesta — Zoroastrian Archives, “5. ABAN YASHT (“Hymn to the Waters”).”