"African Genesis" by Margot Procknow

“Mujaji’s themes are balance, restoration, weather, cleansing and fertility.  Her symbols are rainwater. Mujaji is an African rain Goddess who exudes gently with fertility, or fiercely with cleansing, depending on the need. Her power and presence is so impressive that it led H. Rider Haggard to write the novel She, based on Her cult.

To purify any area and ready it for ritual, sprinkle rainwater as you move clockwise, saying:

 ‘Mujaji, flow through me
Mujaji, cleanse me
Mujaji, rain lightly here on all I love and hold dear.’

To expel unproductive emotions (represented by the sky’s tears), do the same thing, but move counter clockwise – this is the traditional direction of banishing.

If it does rain gently today, it is a sign of blessing. Go out and skip, dance, or sing in the rain (think Gene Kelly with a magical twist). This will renew your spirit and lift any dark clouds overshadowing your heart.

Africans observe the Masquerade as a time to reinstate symmetry in the world and in themselves. They wear elaborate costumes to appease the divine, praying for the necessary rainfall to ensure rich soil, and consequently an abundant harvest. To adapt this, pray to Mujaji to enrich the soil of your soul so that come the fall, you  can harvest Her productive nature.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

Mujaji is a rain Goddess of the Lovedu people in South Africa.  She sent drought to Her people’s enemies but caused rain to fall on Her people.  “The Goddess Mujaji seldom appeared to human beings.  She is said to reside in the Drakensberg Mountains.  In times past, She was propitiated with sacrifices of cattle.  She also ruled over purification and cleansed Her worshippers in preparation for ritual, and the people danced as an offering to Her.” [1]

"Mother of the Garden of Modjadji" by Lisa Iris

“The Rain Queens of the Lovedu bore Her name, whose incarnations they were.  These women, highly regarded for political prowess as well as military might, kept their people safe, first from the Zulu and later from the European Boers.  A weather Goddess, Mujaji controlled storms and floods; those who worshipped Her were rewarded with gentle rain that made gardens flourish” (Monaghan, 2009, p. 18).

Makobo Modjadji VI, the Rain Queen who led South Africa's Balobedu people, died aged only 27 on June 12, 2005. Currently there is no ruling Rain Queen.

“The original Mujaji, sometimes called Mujaji I, lived in isolation and was considered both wise and immortal.  She mated with Her father, Mugodo, and gave birth to Mujaji II, who succeeded her mother as queen.  During the reign of Mujaji II and her daughter Mujaji III, the Lovedu homeland was invaded by Europeans and Zulus.  Although the Europeans conquered the Lovedu, the tribe and its beliefs survived.  These two queens were were followed by Mujaji IV.  According to the Lovedu, Mujaji IV continues to oversee the supply of rainfall and the cycle of seasons in their land.  People make offerings to Mujaji and perform dances to please her.  A rain doctor assists by seeking the cause of any droughts and performing rituals to remove obstacles that block rainmaking powers.” [2]


Auset, Brandi. The Goddess Guide: Exploring the Attributes and Correspondences fo the Divine Feminine, “Mujaji“.

Monaghan, Patricia. Encyclopedia of Goddesses and Heroines, “Mujaji“.

Myth Encyclopedia, “Mujaji“.

Stella. Goddesses and Gods, “Goddess Mujaji“.

Suggested Links:

Boddy-Evans, Alistair.  About.com: African History, “The Lovedu Rain Queen“.

Rain Queens of Africa, “Modjadji, The Rain Queen“.

Rain Queens of Africa, “The Rain Queen and the Lobedu: A North Sotho Tribe“.

The Suppressed Histories Archives: real women, global vision, “African Warrior Women“.

Wikipedia, “Rain Queen“.