“Amaterasu” by Jade M. Sheldon

“Wakahiru’s themes are needlecraft, arts and creativity.  Her symbols are needles, thread, yarn, embroidered or woven items.  Wakahiru, the Japanese Goddess of weaving, takes a much-deserved break from Her toils today to enjoy the beauty of handcrafted items, and She suggests you do likewise. Legend has it that She is also the dawn Goddess – a suitable job for the younger sister of Amaterasu (the sun Goddess), who favored Wakahiru because of Her excellent weaving skills.  When Wakahiru died, Amaterasu refused to shine until lured out of Her hiding place by the gods rolling a large bronze mirror in front of the entrance to the cave while Uzume began to dance on a large overturned tub.

Find a pocket sewing kit and use it as a Wakahiru charm for creativity. Energize the charm by leaving it in the light of dawn, saying:

‘With inventiveness fill
by your power and my will.’

Carry the token often, touching it when you need extra ingenuity to handle a situation effectively.

The Japanese hold the art of needlecraft in such high regards that all the needles broken in the precious year receive honor in the Hari-kuyo ceremony (Mass of Broken Needles) at Buddhist temples today, along with an array of sewing gear. To venerate the needles’ sacrifice in the name of beauty, no needlework is done on this day. In keeping with this spirit, take out any artistic tools you have, clean them up and bless them in any way suited to your path. By doing so, you encourage Wakarhiru’s genius to shine through them each time you work.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

“Wakahirume (pronounced wa-ka-HEER-oo-may) is the Japanese Goddess of the rising sun and of weaving. Wakahirume is sometimes identified as the child or younger sister of Amaterasu, or as Amaterasu Herself. The name Wakahirume (“young-day-female”) suggests a contrast to Ōhirume (“great-day-female”), another name for Amaterasu.[1]  As identified as the younger sister of Amaterasu, She is the daughter of Izanami and Izanagi. Wakahirume was a fantastic weaver and She was often to be found in Amaterasu’s weaving halls, creating garments for all the gods. When their brother Susanoo flew into a rage against Amaterasu, he threw a skinned pony into the hall. Wakahirume was so startled that she fell onto her shuttle and died. It was Her grief over Wakahirume’s death that drove Amaterasu to hide herself away in a cave. In the third century CE, Empress Jingu established the Ikuta Shrine in honor of Wakahirume, one of the oldest shrines in Japan. Wakahirume’s name is also seen as Wakahiru-Me and Wakahirume-no-Mikoto.” [2]