“The Mother of Ten Thousands Things’s theme is luck.  Her symbol is any lucky token.  This Goddess represents the unknowable and uncontrollable things we face daily. In Indo-Chinese tradition, she is part of the Universe’s ebb and flow, ever changing and ever the same. Turn to her when you feel as if ten thousand things in your life were up in the air.

Take out any item that you associate with good fortune. Name it after the one area of your life in which you need more luck (naming something designates its purpose and powers). Hold the token to the night sky (symbolic of the Universe’s vastness), saying something like this:

“Mother, see this symbol of my need
Empower it with your fortunate influence to fill my year with < ….. >
< fill in with the name of your token >”

Carry this with you as often as possible to manifest that energy in your life.

Vietnamese New Year, known as Tet, is filled with ceremonies for luck over several days, including an offering to the Goddess and ancestors to give fortune a boost. Eating rice today invokes the spirit of prosperity. Or you can try a traditional divinatory activity instead. Make note of the name of the first person you meet today. If the name has an auspicious meaning (check a baby-name book), your meeting presages a wonderful year filled with the Mother’s serendipity.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

The ten thousand things is a Chinese expression used to mean the indefinite multitude of all forms and beings in manifest existence.

Thus, it denotes the fecundity of the all-creative maya – the boundless abundance of Our Mother God, and also the world of multiplicity, change and flux as opposed to the unitary transcendence of the Spirit.  Thus, the expression ten thousand things represents not only all the possible productions of space and time, but the full extent of space and time themselves: and thus the total creation of Our Mother God. [1]

“Source of the ten thousand things in Taoist philosophy, She holds creation in Her womb.  She is non-dual consciousness, who encompasses emptimess and form; yin and yang; happiness and sorrow; heaven and earth; creation and destruction; birth and death.  Through Her, all things come to be; in Her, life bears fruition.  She is pristine awareness, undefiled mind and sinless purity.” (Beverly Lanzetta, “Radical Wisdom: A Feminist Mystical Theology“)

“The Tao that can be told is not the eternal Tao;
The name that can be named is not the eternal name.
The nameless is the beginning of heaven and earth.
The named is the mother of ten thousand things.
Ever desireless, one can see the mystery.
Ever desiring, one can see the manifestations.
These two spring from the same source but differ in name;
this appears as darkness.
Darkness within darkness.
The gate to all mystery.” (Laozi, “Tao Te Ching” Ch. 1 as translated by Gia-Fu Feng & Jane English [1972])

Desire, the Mother of Ten Thousand Things” by Beth Mitchum is a neat blog to read, inspired by the Mother Herself.