“Hera” by Soa-Lee

“Gamelia’s themes are luck, health, prosperity and new beginnings. Her symbols are two-sided items (representing the Old and New like coins and hourglasses). Gamelia is a lucky aspect of the Greek Goddess Hera, who brings fortune (especially in love). On this day of new beginnings, Gamelia extends a helping hand by teaching about the cycles in your life and how to cope with them more effectively, adding a little luck to make things easier.

In ancient times, people would wash Gamelia’s statues on this day, symbolically wiping winter away. They would also hang bay, palm, dates and figs around the house to inspire a year with Gamelia’s blessings. Remember Gamelia today to manifest her luck and joy in your life. Eat dates or figs (raisins are a handy substitute), leaving a little outside as an offering to her. To encourage a fresh start, consider turning over an hourglass (or egg timer) as midnight tolls.

As you turn the hourglass, recite this incantation:

‘The sands of time turn again with them new life begins The old now departs Gamelia, refresh my heart.’

For prosperity in the new year, carry any silver colored coin in your pocket the entire day, then use it to make a wish at any nearby fountain or water source. To foster Gamelia’s help with the wish, burn a little myrrh incense.”

(Patricia Telesco, “365 Goddess: a daily guide to the magic and inspiration of the goddess”.)

The only thing I could find online in reference to “Gamelia” was from Wikipedia in which it states: “Gamelia  in ancient Athens may be a wedding customary law, a name of a wedding festival or wedding solemnities in general. Gamelion was the name of the month (15 December- 15 January) in Attic calendar, when marriages were used to take place.”  Further down, it states: “Gamelia was also the name of a sacrifice offered to Athena on the day previous to the marriage of a girl. She was taken by her parents to the temple of the goddess in the Acropolis, where the offerings were made on her behalf. (Suidas, s. v. proteleia) The plural, Gameliai was used to express wedding solemnities in general. (Lycophron, ap, Etym. m.s.v.)” [1]

Read more about Hera by clicking here to be taken to my March 10 entry on her.




Wikipedia, “Gamelia“.



Suggested Links:

Goddessgift.com, “Goddess Symbols: Hera

Goddessgift.com, “Hera, Greek Goddess of Love and Marriage“.

Heckart, Kelley. Kelley Heckart, author of Historical Celtic fantasy romances, “Pre-Hellenic Goddesses“.

Morgan, Anne.  Order of the White Moon, “Hera: Great Mother Goddess“.

Regula, deTraci. About.com, “Fast Facts on: Hera

Sosa, Sylvia. Sweet Biar College {History of Art Program}, “Hera: The First Greek Goddess“.

Theoi Greek Mythology, “Hera“.

Theoi Greek Mythology, “Hera and HPH“.